Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If I am not modifying any static variable inside the argument constructor, is below the proper way to simulate new T[N] (x,y); (array new with arguments) ?

template<typename T>
void* operator new [] (size_t size, const T &value)
{
  T* p = (T*) malloc(size);
  for(int i = size / sizeof(T) - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    memcpy(p + i, &value, sizeof(T));
  return p;
}

Usage will be,

struct A
{
  A () {}  // default
  A (int i, int j) {} // with arguments
};

int main ()
{
  A *p = new(A(1,2)) A[10];  // instead of new A[10](1,2)
}
share|improve this question
1  
+1. Good Question. –  Nawaz May 20 '11 at 9:57
1  
You could avoid some copying by passin const T& value instead of T value –  sehe May 20 '11 at 10:01
2  
T value ... memcpy(..., &value, ...); is certainly not a good idea. –  Martin Ba May 20 '11 at 10:02
1  
I think the approach is plain wrong. Any variant of new is not supposed to construct anything. It only returns an address for the constructor to be called at. Also you would need to provide a matching operator delete in case the construction fails. But no, don't do this. Use std::vector. –  Alexandre C. May 20 '11 at 10:09
    
If this was working, why isn't it in the language already? –  Bo Persson May 20 '11 at 10:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This isn’t OK. You are copying objects into uninitialised memory without invoking proper copy semantics.

As long as you’re only working with PODs, this is fine. However, when working with objects that are not PODs (such as your A) you need to take precautions.

Apart from that, operator new cannot be used in this way. As Alexandre has pointed out in the comments, the array won’t be initialised properly since C++ will call constructors for all elements after having called your operator new, thus overriding the values:

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
void* operator new [] (size_t size, T value) {
    T* p = (T*) std::malloc(size);
    for(int i = size / sizeof(T) - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        new(p + i) T(value);
    return p;
}

struct A {
    int x;
    A(int x) : x(x) { std::cout << "int ctor\n"; }
    A() : x(0) { std::cout << "default ctor\n"; }
    A(const A& other) : x(other.x) { std::cout << "copy ctor\n"; }
};

int main() {
    A *p = new(A(42)) A[2];
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 2; ++i)
        std::cout << p[i].x << std::endl;
}

This yields:

int ctor
copy ctor
copy ctor
default ctor
default ctor
0
0

… not the desired outcome.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the placement-new. That is a huge improvement over memcpy. –  Nawaz May 20 '11 at 10:05
2  
No, don't construct anything into operator new. It should only return an address, period. –  Alexandre C. May 20 '11 at 10:10
    
@AlexandreC. Not in this overload. The question was explicitly after constructing objects, which is totally fine. You’re thinking the one-parameter ::operator new, which is a whole different matter. –  Konrad Rudolph May 20 '11 at 10:11
1  
@Konrad: neither placement new nor nothrow new construct anything in their definition either. They only return the address the object should be constructed at. If you do this (which I doubt is possible, since your objects will be overwritten with default constructed objects, potentially leaking a lot of things), then you would also have to provide a matching operator delete, in case your operator new throws an exception. –  Alexandre C. May 20 '11 at 10:13
    
@AlexandreC. Yes but they are different. This overload is a completely different function which just happens to have the same name. This also constructs objects. C++ has no restriction that says that an overloaded operator new cannot construct objects, in fact quite the opposite – C++ already defines overloads that construct objects: consider for example new int[10] (). This creates a C-array of 10 objects of type T and initialises them. –  Konrad Rudolph May 20 '11 at 10:15

I'd suggest

 std::vector<A> v(10, A(1,2));

I realize that this doesn't really address the question for arrays. You could use

 p = &v[0]; 

since the standard guarantees contiguous storage. Be very careful with resizing the vector though, because it could invalidate p

I checked boost::array<> (which adapts C style arrays), but it doesn't define constructors...

share|improve this answer

That's not okay - C++ will call those objects non-trivial default constructors if typename T has such (struct A in your example does have one) and that would lead to reconstructing objects in memory already occupied.

An appropriate solution would be to use std::vector (recommended) or call ::operator new[] to allocate memory, then call constructors using placement-new and taking care of exceptions if any.

share|improve this answer

You should consider that operator new[] may be called asking for more memory than the bare amount sizeof(T) * n.

This extra memory is possibly needed because C++ must know how many object to destroy in case of delete[] p; but it cannot reliably use the size of block of memory allocated by new p[sz] to infer this number because the memory may have been asked to a custom memory manager so (e.g. your case) there is no way to know how much memory was allocated only by knowing the pointer.

This also means that your attempt to provide already-initialized objects will fail because the actually array returned to the application will potentially not start at the address you returned from your custom operator new[] so that initialization could be misaligned.

share|improve this answer
template <typename myType> myType * buildArray(size_t numElements,const myType & startValue) {
  myType * newArray=(myType *)malloc(sizeof(myType)*numElements);

  if (NULL!=newArray) {
    size_t index;
    for (index=0;index<numElements;++index) {
      new (newArray+index) myType(startValue);
    }
  }

  return newArray;
}

template <typename myType> void destroyArray(size_t numElements,myType * oldArray) {
  size_t index;
  for (index=0;index<numElements;++index) {
    (oldArray+index)->~myType();
  }
  free(oldArray);
}

A * p=newArray(10,A(1,2));
destroyArray(10,p);

destroyArray could also be written like this depending on the platform you are building for:

template <typename myType> void destroyArray(myType * oldArray) {
  size_t numElements=malloc_size(oldArray)/sizeof(myType); //or _msize with Visual Studio
  size_t index;
  for (index=0;index<numElements;++index) {
    (oldArray+index)->~myType();
  }
  free(oldArray);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Please tell me how in the earth this code has any advantage over std::vector ? –  Alexandre C. May 20 '11 at 18:49
    
@Alexandre Either from habit or necessity, some people are control freaks when it comes to memory allocation. I used malloc here but it could it be any other memory allocator. –  IronMensan May 21 '11 at 13:14
    
@Alexandre These functions provide new[]-like semantics while providing control over object construction which is what the OP asked about. Not all array questions are XY problems to be answered with STL. –  IronMensan May 21 '11 at 13:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.