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let's assume that there is a service out there as following;

http://exmaple.com/service1/GetSomething?apikey={api-key-goes-here}

an my api key is : 96a143c8-2f62-470c-b81f-dec5fc271873

so we will be making calls to > http://exmaple.com/service1/GetSomething?apikey=96a143c8-2f62-470c-b81f-dec5fc271873 link and it gives back the response as JSON.

when I consume that with JQuery (or any other client side JavaScript library), how will that key will be secure? I am thinking that and I figured there is no way. If I am going to make a call to that service with client side call, it will be our in the open.

any idea on this?

thanks.

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Make a proxy.

Post the values to one of your pages and from this page make the real request on the server-side, then return the value you get.

Of note: You cannot make a cross-domain request with javascript, mainly browsers don't allow this for security reasons.

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Totally correct! +1! (note to the note: You could simulate cross-domain requests using JSONP) –  elusive May 20 '11 at 10:28
    
@BrunoLM ok, I partially understood that. 'You cannot make a cross-domain request with javascript' so according to this sentence, exmaple.com/service1/… service cannot be called from example.org with client side code. right? –  tugberk May 20 '11 at 12:38
    
@BrunoLM also let's assume that I created a service to consume that service in my app. and this service url is example.co.uk/MyService this service will include my api key and all that stuff and it will return the result. So that service will be my service to use inside client-side code. what will prevent smbdy to consume that service? for example, with fiddler? –  tugberk May 20 '11 at 12:44
    
@BrunoLM ow, sorry. I forgot to thank you for your answer. thanks :) –  tugberk May 20 '11 at 12:45
1  
@tugberk, 1. right. 2. Your api key should be on your proxy only, and from the javascript you would submit all other values to your proxy and your proxy would make the request then return the value. This way people won't know your key. But that doesn't prevent they from requesting your proxy, but you can validate from where the request is coming. –  BrunoLM May 20 '11 at 15:19
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the only way to secure it from a client perspective is to proxy request to API on your server and adding that key in your app.

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thanks. same question : let's assume that I created a service to consume that service in my app. and this service url is example.co.uk/MyService this service will include my api key and all that stuff and it will return the result. So that service will be my service to use inside client-side code. what will prevent smbdy to consume that service? for example, with fiddler? as I understood, anybody who has ability to view source my html markup can consume that service. am I on the correct direction here? –  tugberk May 20 '11 at 12:46
1  
that's another problem. In fact, the API key will be effectively masked as the proxy will handle the request to the external webservice himself. But someone reading your HTML and calling your proxy with appropriate parameters should be able to consume results from the external service. Now, that's just 'basic' security question. How can I prevent a user from calling a web page and authorizing another one... Session management could do the trick with a token in session for a particular user, for example. Or based on your requirement, you could restrain access for a number of checks by IP –  Grooveek May 20 '11 at 12:53
    
hmm, creating token sounds reasonable. So, when a web page is called, I can create a token which will be shared between the page and my service. So, I can pass the token to my service and compare them. or, basically I can access the session collection from my service to read a particular session for my token? can I? –  tugberk May 20 '11 at 13:07
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when a client authentify himself or arrives in a particular area of the site, open a session. In that session, you could allow a particular token (and i would add with TTL). In your service, check for the availability of the token in session. But, that doesn't keep you from preventing SPAM by constraining number of request per ... (complete with hour, minute, second, decade, whatever) –  Grooveek May 20 '11 at 13:25
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The best approach that I found was to give your user an API_KEY and a SECRET_KEY.

Build your REST API request passing in the API_KEY, timestamp and any other parameters necessary for making the call.

Using a scripting language like PHP create an API_SIGNATURE variable using two way encryption with your SECRET_KEY and append that to your base url and that is what you fire off as your request.

Now anyone can see that request and that is why you put the timestamp in as a parameter. Basically you can put in a constraint that will only process requests that are less than one minute old.

Example: (do this part in scripting language)

$API_BASE_URL="http://api.yourdomain.com/1.1/comments.json?api_key=2002&timestamp=2323234544&id=4";
$API_KEY=300;
$API_SIGNATURE=hash_hmac('sha256', API_BASE_URL, API_KEY);
$API_URL=$API_BASE_URL.'&api_signature='.$API_SIGNATURE;

--

Now in your jquery ajax url: echo out $API_URL using PHP.

--

In your API when you get a request you lookup the users account based on API_KEY and get their SECRET_KEY and decrypt the signature and make sure that matches what was passed in. If that passes now check the timestamp and make sure the request is less than a minute old.

You can also do rate limiting and a whole bunch of other stuff before processing the request.

Thats it.


Also people are saying cross domain requests are not allowed by browsers. That is true if you are requesting json but you can get around this using jsonp.


The hash_hmac is available in many programming and scripting languages. So if you develop an API you can use it on the web with PHP and in your iphone app with objective c.

Pretty simple.

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