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I'm trying to learn the basic jist of a Semaphore in the Dining Philosopher problem. Right now, I have an array of class Chopstick, and each Chopstick has a semaphore with 1 available permit:

public class Chopstick
{
    Thread holder = null;
    private Semaphore lock = new Semaphore(1);

    public synchronized void take() throws InterruptedException
    {
    	this.lock.acquire();
    	holder = Thread.currentThread();

    }

    public synchronized void release()
    {	
    	this.lock.release();
    	holder = null;
    }
}

The holder variable is used for a function that I am not sure I need:

public synchronized void conditionalRelease()
{
	if (holder == Thread.currentThread())
	{
		holder = null;
		this.lock.release();
	}
}

The program compiles and runs, but seems to have some trouble releasing the chopsticks. Sometimes, the chopsticks get released, sometimes they don't. When they don't release, the program eventually hangs up when all of the chopsticks are taken and one philosopher is hungry.

Here is the code within the Philosopher class to release the chopstick after a random amount of time:

System.out.println(this.name + " is eating");
Thread.sleep(this.getRandTime());
System.out.println(this.name + " has finished eating");

rightChopstick.release();
System.out.println(this.name + " has released the right chopstick");
leftChopstick.release();
System.out.println(this.name + " has released the left chopstick");

My program does output "Philosopher 0 has finished eating", for example, and continues execution. The other two lines never output, so obviously something is wrong with the way I am releasing.

Any help is appreciated.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would take the 'synchronized' keyword out of your method signatures. You're using an external locking mechanism (the semaphore, in this case). The 'synchronized' keyword is trying to get locks using the object's own mutex. You are now locking on 2 resources which I suspect might be causing a deadlock.

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Ha! That's exactly what it was... I had to implement this two different ways for an assignment and I copy-pasted code for the first method and forgot to remove the synchronized keyword. Nice find. –  Logan Serman Mar 3 '09 at 16:34
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The problem is that when thread1 has a specific chopstick and another tries to get the same one it will wait in the take()-method on line this.lock.acquire(); but it will NOT release the monitor on the object itself.

If now thread1 tries to release the chopstick it can not enter the release()-method since it's still locked by the other thread waiting in take(). That's a deadlock

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It seems a little confusing that you are both locking on the chopstick and having it hold a semaphore of size 1. Generally a semaphore provides tickets to a resource and if you have only one ticket, that's effectively mutual exclusion which is identical to a lock (either a synchronized block or a Lock object). You might consider actually making the Chopstick the lock object itself.

I did a blog post on the dining philosophers in Java a while back if you're interested, although it's really about how to avoid deadlock by using other strategies.

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Looks like this was part of a homework assignment where he had some cooky requirement stating that the had to use semaphores. –  Outlaw Programmer Mar 3 '09 at 17:43
    
The other thing you can do is actually have Chopstick extend Semaphore (or Lock). :) Although that won't buy you anything over using it directly. –  Alex Miller Mar 3 '09 at 19:24
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Philospher needs to acquire lock on both chosticks before start eating and will pickup leftone first then wait for right so start eating so start method should be synchronised. Following methods will make it work:

public synchronized void startEating() {
    leftChopstick.acquire();
    rightChopstick.acquire();
}

public void finishEating(int id) {
    leftChopstick.release();
    rightChopstick.release();
}
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