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I have a piece of code to read a InputStream and write the content into an OutputStream:

BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(...);
FileOutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream outStream(...);

int read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
while (read != -1) {
    outStream.write(buffer, 0, read);
    read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
}

It works, but i don't like it since the variable read is declared out of the loop, and read() method is written twice. The revised version:

 for (int read = 0; read != -1; read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize)) {
      outStream.write(buffer, 0, read);
 }

It looks better but not good enough because the first iteration is useless (and maybe harmful) with read=0.

Do you have a better solution?

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3  
IMHO the first version is far more readable than the second version. –  Simon Woker May 20 '11 at 11:49
2  
or you could just use commons-io and replace the whole thing with IOUtils.copy(in, outStream); –  stevevls May 20 '11 at 11:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Personally I break the normal "no side-effect in a condition" rule for this sort of thing:

int bytesRead;
while ((bytesRead = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize)) != -1)
{
    outStream.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
}

EDIT: As noted, it does involve declaring read outside the loop, but it only calls read() once. I've never found it to be a problem - while I generally prefer to declare variables with as small a scope as possible, that's more a general cleanliness thing. If you want to limit the scope further you can put the whole thing in braces, or extract it to its own method, like Alan's approach. Here's how I'd implement it though:

public static void copyStream(InputStream input, OutputStream output)
    throws IOException {
  byte[] buffer = new byte[1024 * 16]; // Reasonable general size

  int bytesRead;
  while ((bytesRead = in.read(buffer, 0, buffer.length)) != -1) {
    outStream.write(buffer, 0, bytesRead);
  }
}

Alternatively you could provide the buffer length as a parameter. Note that this can now go off into a utility library, and you need never write the code again.

Alternatively, you could use the fact that it's already available in other utility libraries, such as Guava as ByteStreams.copy

share|improve this answer
    
This still requires bytesRead to be declared outside the loop, which was explicitly not wanted. –  Alan Escreet May 20 '11 at 12:29
    
well, this answer is generally the same as the one from Mat (and both at the almost same time). But why this one has got much more vote-ups? only because it is Jon? Or you've read something that i had not seen? –  chance May 20 '11 at 12:31
    
@Alan: I'd missed that bit. Will edit. –  Jon Skeet May 20 '11 at 12:32

You can do it this way:

BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(...);
FileOutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream outStream(...);

while (true) { // can i use for(;;) in Java ???
    int read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
    if (read == -1) break;
    outStream.write(buffer, 0, read);
}

It uses a break, though. Some people say break is bad/not so good style.

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1  
I like this one :) –  chance May 20 '11 at 11:59
    
my old cs-teacher always told me: "It's like getting out of the airplane with the ejection seat". imho: it depends on the loop. In this case, it doesn't make any sense to use break and while is the better option (see other answers). –  Simon Woker May 20 '11 at 12:01
    
@Simon: isn't break here a kind of guard clause? –  chance May 20 '11 at 12:07
    
Well, strictly speaking, this option avoids read having a larger scope than necessary. I agree that is not very important. –  gpeche May 20 '11 at 12:08
1  
yes, for (;;) is valid in Java - compiles to the same as while (true) –  Carlos Heuberger May 20 '11 at 12:08

This form is rather usual:

while ((read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize)) != -1) {
  ...
}

but not so good for clarity IMO.

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and the read varibale has to be definece out of the loop. –  chance May 20 '11 at 11:49
    
My second version is not recommended, is it? –  chance May 20 '11 at 11:53
1  
@wang: in my opinion it's even less readable, and you are correct in pointing out that the first iteration is wrong. this version is quite usual, you'll see it a lot so other people reading your code shouldn't be too puzzled. –  Mat May 20 '11 at 11:56

It's not brilliant, but with a simple block, you can stop the read variable from being accessed later in the method:

BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(...);
FileOutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream outStream(...);

{
    int read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
    while (read != -1)
    {
        outStream.write(buffer, 0, read);
        read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
    }
}

// ...rest of your code

...but I agree, I've also often wanted a while loop where the value to be tested is initialized inside the loop. As far as I know, it's not possible.

Another way to do it is to use the extract method design pattern to pull out that loop in to a completely separate method, i.e.

public void yourMethod() {
    BufferedInputStream in = new BufferedInputStream(...);
    FileOutputStream outStream = new FileOutputStream outStream(...);

    this.writeToOutputStream(in, outStream);
}

private void writeToOutputStream(InputStream in, OutputStream outStream) {
    int read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
    while (read != -1)
    {
        outStream.write(buffer, 0, read);
        read = in.read(buffer, 0, bufferSize);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
good to know that pattern :) –  chance May 20 '11 at 12:26

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