Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

For example, a user will be rendered throughout my application as

<div class="user">
  <p class="username">${}</p>
  <p class="karma">${user.karma}</p>
  <img src="/users/${}"/>

How can I reuse this code block?

Note - my code is running within a tag, so I can't use tags for this (or any JSP) otherwise I get a Scripting elements are disallowed here error.


I'm trying to use a tag file, but getting PropertyNotFoundException.

This is my tag file called 'user.tag':

<%@tag description="User" pageEncoding="UTF-8" %>

<a href="../user/${}">
    <img class='avatar' src='${user.avatarUrl}' alt=""/>

And usage inside a jsp:

Where job.poster is a java bean with id, name, and avatarUrl properties. If I add

<%@attribute name="user" %>

to the tag file, then I get an exception

Property 'id' not found on type java.lang.String
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since JSP 2.0, there is yet another kind of tags: Tag files. Tag files are JSP custom tags written as a JSP template itself, which seems to be what you want. shows how to use such a tag file as general layout solution. Using them as component should be even easier.

share|improve this answer
Please see my edited question - I would like to use a tag file, but so far it's a no go. – ripper234 May 20 '11 at 12:59
I found the solution:… – ripper234 May 20 '11 at 13:06

Why don't you use a custom tag or jsp functions.


share|improve this answer
You mean: Why don't you use a custom tag or jsp functions? right? – Harry Joy May 20 '11 at 12:10
Updated my question to explain why. – ripper234 May 20 '11 at 12:13
Yes, thanks @Harry Joy – Ramesh PVK May 20 '11 at 12:13
And, being picky, I think the title should be JSTL not JSLT. – planetjones May 20 '11 at 12:13
@ripper234 a tag can also contain jsp. Make that tag body as JSP. It should work. – Ramesh PVK May 20 '11 at 12:14

For the example you have given it sounds like some templating framework is needed, to display the user badge on each screen. At its simplest level this may just be a jsp:include which always includes your "UserBadge.jsp".

If you are running on a web framework e.g. JSF you may use Facelet templates or write a custom component for this. So the answer depends on what framework you have. Breaking it down to just JSP and JSTL - the included JSP or a javax.servlet.jsp.tagext.Tag would certainly reduce the duplication.

Always be careful to follow the DRY Principle... Don't Repeat Yourself!

share|improve this answer
I would like to use a tag for this, but not sure exactly how to define it. Could you point me towards a code sample? – ripper234 May 20 '11 at 12:47

You should be able to use tag files within tag files; this works for me in a JSP 2.2 container:

<%-- mytag.tag --%>
<%@tag description="demo code" pageEncoding="UTF-8"%>
<%@taglib prefix="cust" tagdir="/WEB-INF/tags" %>
<%@attribute name="message"%>
<cust:mytag2 message="${message}" /><%-- uses mytag2.tag --%>

If that fails, you can use the include directive: <%@include file="/WEB-INF/jspf/fragment.jspf" %>

Note that the spec says about tags:

Directive Available? Interpretation/Restrictions
page      no         A tag file is not a page. The tag directive must
                     be used instead. If this directive is used in a
                     tag file, a translation error must result.

So, fragment.jspf must not have a any elements that are not supported in tags, including a page directive.

share|improve this answer

I feel sometimes creating a .tag file is overkill (especially if it's only for one page), and I've wanted what you describe for years, so I wrote my own, simple solution. See here:

share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.