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I have a list of 2-tuples like this:

l = [('a', 1), ('b', 2)]

and I want to be able to map this onto a dictionary object, so that I can do something like

l.a #=> 1

So I tried this, but why does it fail?

d = reduce(lambda y,x : y.update({x[0]:x[1]}),l,{})

This gives the error:

AttributeError: 'NoneType' object has no attribute 'update'

What am I doing wrong?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted
>>> l = [('a', 1), ('b', 2)]
>>> d = dict(l)
>>> d['a']
1 
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Don't know why i didn't figure this out! Thanks Andrey –  nemesisfixx May 20 '11 at 13:22
    
While this solves mcnemesis's problem, this answer doesn't address his question as to why his code was failing. –  Steven Rumbalski May 20 '11 at 14:37
1  
@Steven Rumbalski: Because dict.update returns None, not the dict. –  Jochen Ritzel May 20 '11 at 14:52
    
@Steven Rumbalski, True the answer doesn't "answer" my problem, but once I realized what I was doing wrong, and after seeing @Andrey's answer, I adopted his "clean" approach. –  nemesisfixx May 20 '11 at 15:02

Why not just do this:

d = dict(l)

Also, to answer your question, your solution is failing because y (which is a 2-tuple) has no method update, since it's not a dict. Thankfully, what you're doing is built right in.

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Thanks @Rafe Kettler, what confuses me though about my approach, is; on the first time that reduce run, given that I pass in the {} as initial value, can't I call update on it? Isn't y bound to the value {} in this case, the first time reduce executes? Or am I mistaken? –  nemesisfixx May 20 '11 at 15:07

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