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I have a sql server query question. I have a table like below. Giving a parameter to stored procedure, I need to query mutual CustomFields in lists that I want. For example, if ListID is given 1 and 2 and 3, result table will have columns that gives me 'FullName' in that case, because only 'FullName' is in all three ID's. I did that which solved the issue somehow, but looking for a better and precise practice. Thanks

SELECT DISTINCT(CustomField) 
FROM CustomFields a
WHERE EXISTS (
      SELECT count(*) 
      FROM CustomFields b 
      WHERE a.CustomField = b.CustomField 
      HAVING count(*)>2
)
ORDER BY a.CustomField


CustomField   ListID
PhoneNumber   1
Unvan         1
FullName      2
Surname       2
Regiob        2
FullName      3
BirthPlace    3
FullName      1
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2  
Unless you're always looking for the field name that shares at least three identifiers, this sounds like you'd need to use a table value parameter. What version of SQL Server are you running? –  Yuck May 20 '11 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's a more common approach to find CustomFields that are in groups 1, 2 and 3:

SELECT  CustomField
FROM    CustomFields
WHERE   ListID in (1,2,3)
GROUP BY
        CustomField
HAVING  COUNT(DISTINCT ListId) = 3

No subquery required, and the where clause filters out uninteresting groups before the group by.

share|improve this answer
    
This is good for the example posted in the question, but what if the IDs change? And what if you want to have the CustomField where the ListID matches 7, 20, 47, and 56 - for example? –  Yuck May 20 '11 at 13:44
    
@Yuck: You'd use ListID in (7,20,47,56) and count(distinct ListId) = 4. How you pass the variables depends on your client language and the version of SQL Server that you're using. –  Andomar May 20 '11 at 13:46
    
Thanks alot @Andomar –  Yagiz Ozturk May 20 '11 at 13:50
1  
The "IN" clause does not allow the use of parameters, so you cannot have something like ...where ListID in (@SomeList). However, it does support subqueries, lke ...where ListId in (select ListId from #Temp) –  Philip Kelley May 20 '11 at 13:51
    
My remark was rhetorical, which I guess got missed. –  Yuck May 20 '11 at 13:57

I was thinking of something more along these lines, which is adapted from @Andomar and is a little more general.

CREATE TYPE ListIdType AS TABLE (
  ListId int PRIMARY KEY
);
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE S
    @ListIdTable ListIdType READONLY
AS BEGIN SET NOCOUNT ON;

SELECT  CustomField
FROM    CustomFields
WHERE   ListID in (SELECT ListId FROM @ListIdTable)
GROUP BY
        CustomField
HAVING  COUNT(DISTINCT ListId) = (SELECT COUNT(ListId) FROM @ListIdTable)

END;
share|improve this answer
    
That's definitely the way to go if you have SQL Server 2008+ and a client language that supports table variables +1 –  Andomar May 20 '11 at 14:01
    
I guess, I have to create a temp table in the database, that will stay permanently –  Yagiz Ozturk May 22 '11 at 20:30

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