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I would like to ask if there is a smart or easy way to get the first and last weekday of a month in MySQL. In other way, I want to avoid Weekends and shift first or last day properly.

For example:

For the period: 2011-05-01 till 2011-05-31
First weekday should be: 2011-05-02 and not 2011-05-01 as 2011-05-01 is Sunday.
Last weekday should be: 2011-05-31 as it is Tuesday.

For the period: 2011-04-01 till 2011-04-30,
First weekday: 2011-04-01
Last weekday: 2011-04-29
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1  
A similar question was asked here: stackoverflow.com/questions/849075/… –  Paul Hanbury May 20 '11 at 13:41
    
if only this was in sql server i could give you exactly how to do this. –  DForck42 May 20 '11 at 13:41
    
I would like not to use an intermediate table with holidays. –  Paris Polyzos May 20 '11 at 13:48
    
Reading also this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/5268030/… I wonder if I could modify it to fit in my problem but can't find a way... –  Paris Polyzos May 20 '11 at 13:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about defining functions FIRST_WDOM() (week/work day of month) and LAST_WDOM() in the style of LAST_DAY()?

DELIMITER //
CREATE FUNCTION first_wdom (d DATETIME) -- First work/week day of month
RETURNS DATE DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
  DECLARE first_dom DATE;
  SET first_dom = DATE_FORMAT(d, '%Y-%m-01');

  RETURN first_dom + INTERVAL (CASE DAYOFWEEK(first_dom)
                               WHEN 1 THEN 1
                               WHEN 7 THEN 2
                               ELSE 0
                               END) DAY;
END //
CREATE FUNCTION last_wdom (d DATETIME) -- Last work/week day of month
RETURNS DATE DETERMINISTIC
BEGIN
  DECLARE last_dom DATE;
  SET last_dom = LAST_DAY(d);

  RETURN last_dom - INTERVAL (CASE DAYOFWEEK(last_dom)
                              WHEN 1 THEN 2
                              WHEN 7 THEN 1
                              ELSE 0
                              END) DAY;
END //
DELIMITER ;

mysql> SELECT FIRST_WDOM('2011-05-10'), LAST_WDOM('2011-05-10');
+--------------------------+-------------------------+
| FIRST_WDOM('2011-05-10') | LAST_WDOM('2011-05-10') |
+--------------------------+-------------------------+
| 2011-05-02               | 2011-05-31              | 
+--------------------------+-------------------------+
1 row in set (0.01 sec)

This is merely an adaptation of ic3b3rg's answer, and assumes that Saturday and Sunday are your weekend days. I use DATETIME, rather than DATE, as the input type to avoid truncation warnings when passing in, say, NOW().

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I think this will do what you ask

SELECT
  CASE DAYOFWEEK(date1)
    WHEN 1 THEN DATE_ADD(date1, INTERVAL 1 DAY)
    WHEN 7 THEN DATE_ADD(date1, INTERVAL 2 DAY)
    ELSE date1 END AS dateStart,
  CASE DAYOFWEEK(date2)
    WHEN 1 THEN DATE_ADD(date2, INTERVAL -2 DAY)
    WHEN 7 THEN DATE_ADD(date2, INTERVAL -1 DAY)
    ELSE date2 END AS dateEnd
FROM myTable
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+1 for an approach without a supporting integer sequence or calendar table. –  pilcrow May 20 '11 at 14:25
    
Nice approach but I think I can make it only with a function call as I have to select data based on these days –  Paris Polyzos May 20 '11 at 21:04

Create a table called tblOffset

tblOffset
dayofweek offset
1         1
2         0
3         0
4         0
5         0
6         0
7         2

Then, to get the first working day after a given date (in my example 2011-01-01), use:

SELECT DATE_ADD('2011-01-01', INTERVAL `offset` DAY), from tblOffset where `dayofweek` = DAYOFWEEK('2011-01-01')

EDIT: This does not take into consideration holidays. But therefore you would need to have a seperate table with all the holidays for your customers locales, religions, etc.

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With a calendar table, I'd probably write

select min(cal_date) first_weekday
from calendar
where cal_date >= '2011-05-01'
  and day_of_week in ('Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri')

My test calendar table has 50 years of calendar data in it. That query returns in 68 microseconds.

select max(cal_date) 
from calendar
where cal_date < '2011-06-01'
  and day_of_week in ('Mon', 'Tue', 'Wed', 'Thu', 'Fri')

Actually, I'd probably create a view of weekdays or a view of workdays, and then query that.

I find a calendar table easier to deal with than the various date functions for multiple dbms platforms. It's more readable--you can look at the SQL and say, "Yeah, that should be right".

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+1 Looks very similar to my answer :) –  Dave Rix May 20 '11 at 13:56

To get the first and last day of the month given a specified date (I used today's date):

select  
 month(current_day) as the_month,
 case
    when dayofweek(days.first_day) = 7 then date_add(days.first_day, interval 2 day)
    when dayofweek(days.first_day) = 1 then date_add(days.first_day, interval 1 day)
    else days.first_day
  end as first_weekday,
  case
    when dayofweek(days.last_day) = 7 then date_sub(days.last_day, interval 1 day)
    when dayofweek(days.last_day) = 1 then date_sub(days.last_day, interval 2 day)
    else days.last_day
  end as last_weekday
from
  ( select
      curdate() as current_day,
      concat(date_format(LAST_DAY(curdate()),'%Y-%m-'),'01') as first_day,  
      LAST_DAY(curdate()) as last_day 
  ) days

If the dates that you need to lookup fall within a well specified range (for example between Jan 1, 1900, and Dec 31, 2199), then you might have better luck precomputing all of these dates, and storing them in a lookup table (with the same three columns in the query above).

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I would try something akin to the solution I gave in question Select all months within given date span, including the ones with 0 values which involved an additional table containing all the dates in a give period. I think mine went from 1970 to 2100 or similar :)

Esentially, you create this table, and add a couple of extra columns called ddFirstWorkDay and ddLastWorkDay as a bit field, which you manually populate with a '1' for the first and last working days of each month in the table - only twelve of these per year, so shouldn't take too long. You can also take into account holidays and other special occasions using this method, as the data is manually entered instead of calculated.

Then, you can create a query along the lines of the following to get the dates you are interested in.

SELECT ddDate from dimDates
WHERE ddDate BETWEEN 'start date' AND 'end date'
   AND ddFirstWorkDay = 1
ORDER BY ddDate
LIMIT 1

SELECT ddDate from dimDates
WHERE ddDate BETWEEN 'start date' AND 'end date'
   AND ddLastWorkDay = 1
ORDER BY ddDate DESC
LIMIT 1

I think this will give you what you need, although you'll need to run two queries for each date range being tested, the table is small so should return very fast.

You may find the dimDates table method interesting for other uses too, so I'd go take a look.. :)

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