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I have created a database of cigarette and trading cards. Each set title has a year associated with it. For example, 1943 or 2011. The year is always 4 characters long, but can be anywhere in the string.

Could someone please help me create a regex that will find the year in the string. I tried '/d{4}\b/' but it is failing.

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I tried '/d{4}\b/' but it failing for some reaosn –  Lizard May 20 '11 at 14:22
    
You forgot a \ in front of the d. For the rest the regex should be fine. Thus '/\d{4}\b/' –  Kris May 20 '11 at 14:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
(19|20)[0-9][0-9]

This will read in only 1900 and 2000 ranged dates.

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2  
Pity your comments are only rude and nonconstructive. –  Mech Software May 20 '11 at 14:22
    
How so, it picked of 1943 and 2011 when entered on regexpal.com without fail. He does not illustrate he wants more than one date, so this will pick the first matching regex 4 character date. –  Mech Software May 20 '11 at 14:29
    
I can't say I'm sorry enough. I was wrong. I had to make a minor edit (added a period) to your question to unlock my downvote and turn it up. Sorry. Apparently I get way more pissed off by bad regex questions than I thought. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 20 '11 at 14:31
    
No worries, we're all here to help. –  Mech Software May 20 '11 at 14:33
    
A little bit shorter one (19|20)\d{2} –  r92 Aug 14 '13 at 13:34

Try this one :

/\b\d{4}\b/

it will match 4 digits embeded with non-words

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d{4}\b will match four d's at a word boundary. You forgot the backslash in the character class: should be \d{4}\b. Depending on the input data you may also want to consider adding another word boundary (\b) at the beginning.

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this extracts 4 numbers together, but maybe also extract 6537 which is not what i want. But thanks anyway. –  Lizard May 20 '11 at 14:50

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