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Just a quick one, Is there anyway to shorthand this?

It's basically determining the direction left or right, 1 for left, 0 for right

In C#:

if (column == 0) { direction = 0; }
else if (column == _gridSize - 1) { direction = 1; }
else { direction = rand.Next(2); }

The statement following this will be:

if (direction == 1)
{
    // do something
}
else
{
    // do something else
}

If there isn't, it doesn't really matter! just curious:)

share|improve this question
10  
Why would you want to shorten this? It's very readable in its current format which is a key thing to strive for when writing code. – Peter Smith May 20 '11 at 14:46
1  
@Peter Smith - actually it's not immediately obvious that every branch of the if/else is assigning a different value to the same variable. The part direction = is repeated three times. By bringing that out, it makes it objectively clear (not just a matter of opinion, but a fact based on the reduction of needless repetition). – Daniel Earwicker May 20 '11 at 14:48
2  
I agree with @Peter, all the solutions so far are far less readable than what you have. I see no reason to change. – RedFilter May 20 '11 at 14:48
    
@RedFilter - did you see the way that direction = is repeated three times in the original code? – Daniel Earwicker May 20 '11 at 14:50
2  
@Daniel I have no problem with the repetition of direction, because nested ternaries are much harder to parse when reading. I would also say that the repetition of direction makes it more obvious that it is the same variable getting different values in each branch. – RedFilter May 20 '11 at 14:59
up vote 31 down vote accepted

To use shorthand to get the direction:

int direction = column == 0
                ? 0
                : (column == _gridSize - 1 ? 1 : rand.Next(2));

To simplify the code entirely:

if (column == gridSize - 1 || rand.Next(2) == 1)
{
}
else
{
}
share|improve this answer

Use the ternary operator

direction == 1 ? dosomething () : dosomethingelse ();
share|improve this answer
1  
return type of dosomething() & dosomethingelse() both must be same. – Javed Akram May 20 '11 at 14:47
    
@Javed Akram No they do not. Copypasta this and compile it, it runs without problems: #include "stdio.h" char* getString () { return "String"; } int getInt () { return 5; } void main () { printf ("%s %d", 1 ? getString () : getInt (), 0 ? getString () : getInt () ); } – Hyperboreus May 20 '11 at 15:16
1  
your example makes the compiler really angry. This wasn't a C question! – R. Martinho Fernandes May 20 '11 at 15:20
3  
Ashes on my Head! My bad! My bad! I didn't see the tiny hash after the C. And angry compilers are not to be trifled with. – Hyperboreus May 20 '11 at 15:23

Yes. Use the ternary operator.

condition ? first_expression : second_expression;
share|improve this answer
    
You could write better-> condition ? true_expression: false_expression; – Tommix Jan 28 at 12:24

Recently, I really enjoy shorthand if else statements as a swtich case replacement. In my opinion, this is better in read and take less place. Just take a look:

var redirectUrl =
      status == LoginStatusEnum.Success ? "/SecretPage"
    : status == LoginStatusEnum.Failure ? "/LoginFailed"
    : status == LoginStatusEnum.Sms ? "/2-StepSms"
    : status == LoginStatusEnum.EmailNotConfirmed ? "/EmailNotConfirmed"
    : "/404-Error";

instead of

string redirectUrl;
switch (status)
{
    case LoginStatusEnum.Success:
        redirectUrl = "/SecretPage";
        break;
    case LoginStatusEnum.Failure:
        redirectUrl = "/LoginFailed";
        break;
    case LoginStatusEnum.Sms:
        redirectUrl = "/2-StepSms";
        break;
    case LoginStatusEnum.EmailNotConfirmed:
        redirectUrl = "/EmailNotConfirmed";
        break;
    default:
        redirectUrl = "/404-Error";
        break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
switch looks more clear and more dev friendly. And compiler just doesn't give a f#$# :) – Tommix Jan 28 at 12:25

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