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I have an array of IEnumerable (IEnumerable[]) and would like to generate all possible combinations of the elements in these IEnumerables. It is similar to this problem: Generating Permutations using LINQ but I do not know how many IEnumerables I will have beforehand and thus cannot use the described LINQ statement.

To give an example: My array

IEnumerable[] array;

has for example these elements

array[0]={0,1,2};
array[1]={a,b};

Then I would like these to be returned:

{{0,a},{0,b},{1,a},{1,b},{2,a},{2,b}}

But it might also hold:

array[0]={0,1,2};
array[1]={a,b};
array[2]={w,x,y,z};

Then I would need the appropriate permutations. I do not have any information on how many IEnumerables and no information on how many elements each IEnumerable holds.

Thanks in advance for any help,

Lars

share|improve this question
    
What would you expect the output to be when your input is array[0]={0,1,2}; array[1]={a,b}; array[2]={w,x,y,z}? –  David V May 20 '11 at 15:40
    
As above, I don't know that the expected output really counts as all the permutations. Do you have an assumed constraint that each resulting item have only two elements? –  Yuck May 20 '11 at 15:45
    
possible duplicate of Generating all Possible Combinations –  Anthony Pegram May 21 '11 at 4:10
    
Also reference: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/06/28/… –  Anthony Pegram May 21 '11 at 4:11
    
@David V: My expected output would then be {{0,a,w},{0,a,x},{0,a,y},{0,a,z},{0,b,w},{0,b,x},{0,b,y},{0,b,z},{1,a,w}...} @Anthony Pegram: The article from Eric Lippert is what I was searching for, very nice and clean. I just have one more problem with this. Since I stated that I need the code to work with an array of untyped IEnumerables (IEnumerable[]) I am struggling to get Erics code to work. With typed IEnumerables it is perfect. –  larsbeck May 23 '11 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems like you want the Cartesian_product. This should work, although I didn't look particularly carefully at edge-cases

public static IEnumerable<T> Drop<T>(IEnumerable<T> list, long numToDrop)
{
    if (numToDrop < 0) { throw new ArgumentException("Number to drop must be non-negative"); }
    long dropped = 0;
    var iter = list.GetEnumerator();
    while (dropped < numToDrop && iter.MoveNext()) { dropped++; }
    while (iter.MoveNext()) { yield return iter.Current; }
}

public static IEnumerable Concat(object head, IEnumerable list)
{
    yield return head;
    foreach (var x in list) { yield return x; }
}

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable> CrossProduct(IEnumerable<IEnumerable> lists)
{
    if (lists == null || lists.FirstOrDefault() == null) { yield break; }
    var heads = lists.First();
    var tails = CrossProduct(Drop(lists, 1));
    if (tails.FirstOrDefault() == null)
    {
    foreach (var h in heads) { yield return new object[] { h }; }
    }
    else
    {
    foreach (var head in heads)
    {
        foreach (var tail in tails)
        {
        yield return Concat(head, tail);
        }
    }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although as remarked above, Eric Lippert's solution in the question Anthony linked is far prettier. –  Rob May 23 '11 at 15:20
    
Thanks Rob, this works nicely! Eric's solution is very elegant, I agree, but since I am working with untyped collections I can't use it (or don't know how to). The elements in my collections can be anything from an int to an object, although each collection itself is consistent. –  larsbeck May 24 '11 at 6:04

Try this as a direction (you'll need to modify, I'm sure, and I haven't compiled it, so there may be some syntax errors)

public IEnumerable<string> CompileCominations
    (IEnumberable<string[]> arrays, List<string> combinations)
{
    if(combinations == null) combinations = new List<string>();
    for(int i = arrays.Count() - 1; i >= 0; i--)
    {
       if(combinations.Count >= 1) combinations = 
           Combine2Lists(combinations, arrays[i]);
       else 
       {
           combinations = Combine2Lists(arrays[i], arrays[i -1];
           i--;
       }
    }
    return combinations;
}

private List<string> Combine2Lists
    (IEnumberable<string> list1, IEnumerable<string> list2)
{
    List<string> currentList = new List<string>();
    for(int i = 0; i < list1.Count(); i ++)
    {
        for(int j = 0; j < list2.Count(); j++)
        {
            currentList.Add(
              string.Format("{0},{1}", list1[i], list2[j]);
        }
    }
    return currentList;
}

Again, not compiled, but what it should do is keep adding "item1, item2" to a list with a where item1 = the old "item1, item2" and item2 = just the new entry from the nth array.

Thus string array [a, b, c] + string array [1, 2, 3, 4] should yield: {a, 1}, {a, 2}, {a, 3}, {a, 4}, {b, 1}... and adding string array [x, y, z] to the first to would then yield: {a, 1, x}, {a, 1, y}, {a, 1, z} and so forth.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I haven't tried the code above, because it operates on strings and Rob's code was just what I needed, but looking over it I think I could have modified it easily. –  larsbeck May 24 '11 at 6:06

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