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What is better stylewise/readability?

I have a loop that reads input and does different things according to the input, and when an error occurs, I need a simple return;. Example:

while( get_input() )
{
    if( input == "somethingcool" )
    {
        if( !process_somethingcool() )
            return; // <-- a couple of these
    }
    //...
    else // bad input, error handling is fancier than this, but irrelevant to the question
        return;
}
return;

So should I replace the individual return;s with a goto end; and place a label end: right above the last return in the example above or not? I am not in need of "use RAII" because nothing is allocated in the if blocks. Both ways would be identical in all senses of the word, except for the style/readability/performance?

I would suppose performance is identical, but just to be sure: is it?

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4  
Is there a reason for not using exceptions in this case? –  Matt Gibson May 20 '11 at 15:50
    
goto is generally a bad idea. I've never had to use it, unless I'm working with somebody else's code. As far as performance goes, I'm not sure, but I think the style of code is just as important these days as speed, so I would keep it as it is. –  jqueryrocks May 20 '11 at 15:53
    
Can you show more code? Like some more ifs and what they do? Maybe there is a better, more general solution. –  FredOverflow May 20 '11 at 15:54
4  
Let the baseless goto-bashing begin. Two thousand and eleven cookies for a logical argument. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 15:55
1  
@rubenvb It felt to me like it was relevant to your question, because I think it's the standard C++ way of handling the problem you're trying to handle, if I've understood what you want correctly. Effectively, C++ exception handling is doing what you're doing with a "goto" only with a bit more formality and extra functionality you might find useful down the line. It'll probably be more familiar to other C++ programmers, too, most of whom, in my experience, will have used exceptions a lot more than they've used goto. –  Matt Gibson May 20 '11 at 16:04
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12 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For C, goto is reasonable (it's used widely in the Linux kernel) as you can enhance readability with a single point of return.

For C++, because you have the possibility of anything throwing an exception, you implicitly have multiple points of return so you should always use the RAII model with multiple returns.

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1  
And this is why hundreds of thousands of C++ "programmers" sadly misuse exceptions. :( –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:02
1  
Given the robustness of Linux, I wouldn't take their use in its kernel code as a reference. –  James Kanze May 20 '11 at 16:15
    
@James: Heh, indeed. Playing with kernel code is ... interesting. There's certainly no reason to consider it an authority on programming techniques. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:35
    
@James Could you expand that somewhat? Are you saying Linux is not robust? It seems pretty much so to me. –  nbt May 20 '11 at 16:36
    
@Neil: IIRC, truncate() and ftrunate() are pretty good examples. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:43
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Personally, I like to keep the content of any blocks as small as possible. One line, calling out to another function is ideal (after Bob Martin's Clean Code).

I'd go with an option you haven't proposed:

while(get_input()) {
    if(!process_input(input)) {
         break;
    }
}

Where process_input would select the appropriate process_... function, returning whatever that returns, or false if there is bad input.

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"Personally, (after Bob Martin's Clean Code) I like to keep the content of any blocks as small as possible" - this is hardly original with the ghastly Martin. –  nbt May 20 '11 at 16:29
    
You're right. Even before reading CC, I liked to keep my blocks as small as possible, That was supposed to go after the next sentence (moved in edit). It wasn't until I read CC, that I got the properly minimalist "one line" thing. (That's probably not original with him either, but that's where I got it from). –  Paul Butcher May 21 '11 at 12:08
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Just return when you want to return. The C++ language can handle that, and it is the most intuitive way to write your code.

In some languages, cleanup has to be done at the use site, and so it may be a good idea to centralize the "cleanup" phase in a single block that you "goto". In C, this idiom is common.

In C++, resources are cleaned up by themselves in their destructors when they go out of scope. And so at the use site, nothing needs t obe done, and the easiest, cleanest and least error-prone solution is to just have multiple return statements.

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Multiple return statements are actually good style and almost always produce cleaner code than trying to have a single return point. gotos are pretty useless in C++ as (apart from their other problems) they can't jump over initialisations, which possibly forces you to initialise things away from their point of use, which is also bad style.

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6  
Learn some English. I said "pretty useless", not "completely useless", and I justified what I said. –  nbt May 20 '11 at 15:58
1  
@Neil: And I say you didn't; your claim makes no sense. Even "pretty useless" doesn't follow. And please do not get personal. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:00
2  
@Tomalak: Neil is pointing out that goto in C++ has several severe drawbacks that can actually create a lot of subtle errors in your code, making it a strong code smell when it's used. It's quite unlike C in this regard, since C++ has a lot of rules WRT initialization and destruction that goto explicitly violates. –  greyfade May 20 '11 at 16:15
1  
@greyfade Actually, I'm not pointing out that. C++ compilers are required to diagnose jumps over initialisation as errors. I'm saying that using goto will almost certainly cause you to rearrange your code in unnatural ways in order to avoid those errors. –  nbt May 20 '11 at 16:18
2  
@Neil: I have. It does not excuse yours. –  greyfade May 20 '11 at 16:26
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Style and readability would lead me to use exceptions to handle error conditions. How is your caller to know whether your method was invoked correctly?

That said: goto shouldn't be used for this; return is the far better option. If you need to do anything at the end of your routine, regardless of why it dropped out - then you should throw exceptions and use a catch block.

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return is generally preferred to goto; usually, detractors of labels are unable to come up with any actual argument to support their dogma.1

However, your case is more clear-cut: why would you pick the goto? Both solutions are equivalent, except that the goto requires you to write end: just before the end of the function, taking up space and looking ugly for no reason.

Therefore, out of the two options presented, I'd recommend the returns. That said, I'd also recommend seriously considering the other suggestions given in responses to this question (exceptions, and limiting the "nestiness" of your conditionals).


1 Or, if they do, it's usually something along the lines of "goto leaves your objects hanging", which is not true (as per 6.6/2 in the C++0x FDIS). goto does not break the RAII model.

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+1 Use of goto can sometimes be justified but much less so in C++ than C. I agree with your sentiments regarding dogma. –  David Heffernan May 20 '11 at 16:31
    
@David: Yea, granted there aren't many justifiable use cases, and personally I'm not sure I've ever used it. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:38
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The goto End; is nice in part because of readability but also because if you realize later there are things that need to happen before you close the function, freeing memory or releasing resources for example, you can centralize that process instead of copy pasting it.

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Mm yea, true dat. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:05
1  
No, in C++, the way you release resources is in destructors, and so it can be done trivially with multiple return statements. –  jalf May 20 '11 at 16:07
1  
@jalf: Using RAII is a choice. You don't have to use it. Anyway, the OP says - explicitly - that he has no resources to free. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:09
    
Which is why is nice to have IF you are going to end up with said resources. It's a pattern I added to common use a while ago because I found my self copy pasting large chunks of little code to handle those cases and it removes that problem and is more descriptive than just return; –  zellio May 20 '11 at 16:12
    
@Tomalak: shooting yourself in the foot is a choice too. So is writing buggy code. But RAII is a pretty fundamental aspect of good C++ code anno 2011. And it solves the only problem that could otherwise have led someone to prefer goto over multiple return statements –  jalf May 20 '11 at 16:53
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Actually, its not advisable to use goto. It generates problems in readability of the code. Better use a break; statement where you want to leave the loop and return at the end of the code. That's the standard procedure.

while( get_input() )
{
    if( input == "somethingcool" )
    {
        if( !process_somethingcool() )
            break; // <-- a couple of these
    }
    //...
    else // bad input, error handling is fancier than this, but irrelevant to the question
        break; //although its better if you handle it somehow here.
}
return;
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The legibility of goto is just the same as the legibility of return in this use case. Stop repeating baseless dogma. I'd also love to see a citation for your term "standard procedure". –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 15:57
    
I'd love to see you use multiple goto with multiple labels and keep up with that. But I'm not going to advice it to someone. There's a reason why that break keyword exists. –  Bibhas May 20 '11 at 16:03
    
@Bibhas: ... in this use case. Use the right tool for the job instead of generalising. The fact that break does exactly the same thing here as the OP's proposed use of goto, yet you don't even flinch at the possibility of using it, is remarkably telling. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:03
    
Well, I see you already have experience with goto-bashing. So i'll restrain myself from going there. All the answers are here. Let the OP choose what he wants. And another thing, even if I follow your last comment, break is also the right tool for the job here(exactly same as they are).. –  Bibhas May 20 '11 at 16:12
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: No, goto does not do the same thing as break here. There are some subtle differences in how C++ handles scoping and object lifetimes; goto violates that model and break does not. –  greyfade May 20 '11 at 16:18
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Why not structure your code using "guard clauses" (by reversing the logic) instead of the nested ifs. Then the whole question of using goto becomes moot.

while( get_input() )
{
    if( input != "somethingcool" )
    {
        return; //handle error
    }
    if( !process_somethingcool() )
        return; //handle error
    }
}
return; //success
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I don't understand how this moots the question. Regardless, getting rid of the nested ifs is +1. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:37
    
In my example, this does not get rid of nested if. I think you failed to see the //... which signifies lots more strings that could be input, making your construction above incorrect. And it does indeed not answer my question. –  rubenvb May 20 '11 at 16:41
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Neither. You should refactor the code into something readable and maintainable. Every case I've seen (and I've seen a lot) where the programmer has needed a goto, and most of the cases where he's needed multiple returns (and all cases where the return has been nested in a loop) would have be better solved by refactoring the code into separate, simpler functions, each of which had a single return at the end of the function. (Multiple returns are sometimes justified for very simple functions; e.g. I'll use them if the only statement in the function is a switch, and every case ends with a return.)

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Are you trying to start a religious war?

Seriously, there are occasionally places where a goto is the best choice. In twenty years, I've seen around 3 or 4. Multiple returns are not necessarily evil, but if you have to repeat a lot of cleanup code then they become pretty messy.

Very often, you can refactor the code to make such a choice unnecessary. It is hard to make specific suggestions without seeing your code, but maybe something like this:

void f()
{
   bool bDone=false;
   while (!bDone && get_input())
   {
      if (input == "cool")
      {
         process_cool();
         bDone = true;
      }
      else if (input == "unfinished")
      {
         process_something();
      }
      else
      {
          // error
          bDone = true;
      }
   }
}

A big help in refactoring is to make sure you don't have dozens of lines inside the loop. If you have a lit of work to do, break it into functions and call a small number of functions from within the while loop.

Remember that a single function should only do one thing.

Another approach that is highly recommended is to use exceptions to handle error conditions, but it is bad style to use an exception if you have just finished processing, so this might not completely solve your problem.

If you are still confused, consider posting a more realistic chunk of code and we may be able to suggest how best to handle things.

Good Luck!

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IMHO use multiple returns and do not use goto. Those who use goto, also set dogs on fire.

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Really Hyperboreus? set dogs on fire? –  zellio May 20 '11 at 15:52
    
Personally, I see goto statements in procedural or OO language only as legacy from their ancestors. Wild jumping around in your code does not really add to its readability and verifiability. –  Hyperboreus May 20 '11 at 15:53
    
I beg to differ on this one, it allows you to handle abnormal function closure within the top level scope of the function and in a single location. Thus allowing for easier readability. I'm not saying that we should abandon other flow control in favour of goto but this is a case where it's the right tool for the job. –  zellio May 20 '11 at 15:57
1  
@Hyperboreus: Sorry, but that's simply not true. goto is not longjmp; it does not violate object cleanup. See 6.6/2 in the C++0x FDIS. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 20 '11 at 16:38
1  
@Tomalak +10 internets. I've learned a lot today. –  Hyperboreus May 20 '11 at 17:24
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