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I'm trying to subclass/extend the native Date object, without modifying the native object itself.

I've tried this:

    var util = require('util');

    function MyDate() {
        Date.call(this);
    }
    util.inherits(MyDate, Date);

    MyDate.prototype.doSomething = function() {
        console.log('Doing something...');
    };        

    var date = new MyDate();
    date.doSomething();

    console.log(date);
    console.log(date.getHours());

and this:

function MyDate() {

    }

    MyDate.prototype = new Date();

    MyDate.prototype.doSomething = function() {
        console.log("DO");
    }

    var date = new MyDate();
    date.doSomething();
    console.log(date);

In both cases, the date.doSomething() works, but when I call any of the native methods such as date.getHours() or even console.log(date), I get 'TypeError: this is not a Date object.'

Any ideas? Or am I stuck to extending the top-level Date object?

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never mind, misread the question –  hvgotcodes May 20 '11 at 16:59
1  
+1 I tried to do something similar recently, but couldn't get it working properly. I'm very curious what others have to say. –  Chad May 20 '11 at 17:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Looking at the v8 code, in date.js:

function DateGetHours() {
  var t = DATE_VALUE(this);
  if (NUMBER_IS_NAN(t)) return t;
  return HOUR_FROM_TIME(LocalTimeNoCheck(t));
}

And looks like DATE_VALUE is a macro that does this:

DATE_VALUE(arg) = (%_ClassOf(arg) === 'Date' ? %_ValueOf(arg) : ThrowDateTypeError());

So, seems like v8 won't let you subclass Date.

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I know this is a bit late, but for others who may encounter this issue, I manged to effectively subclass Date for a polyfill I needed for PhantomJS. The technique seems to work in other browser as well. There were a few additional issues to work out but essentially I followed the same approach as Rudu.

The full commented code is at https://github.com/kbaltrinic/PhantomJS-DatePolyfill.

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I believe Date is actually a static function, not a true object, and as such cannot be inherited from using prototypes, so you'll need to create a façade class to wrap any Date functionality you need.

I'd try constructing your new date object as:

function MyDate(value) {
  this.value=new Date(value);

  // add operations that operate on this.value
  this.prototype.addDays=function(num){
     ...
  };
  this.prototype.toString=function() {
    return value.toString();
  };
}
// add static methods from Date
MyDate.now=Date.now;
MyDate.getTime=Date.getTime;
...

(I'm not near a system I can test this on, but I hope you get the idea.)

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Section 15.9.5 of the EcmaScript spec says:

In following descriptions of functions that are properties of the Date prototype object, the phrase 'this Date object' refers to the object that is the this value for the invocation of the function. Unless explicitly noted otherwise, none of these functions are generic; a TypeError exception is thrown if the this value is not an object for which the value of the [[Class]] internal property is "Date". Also, the phrase 'this time value' refers to the Number value for the time represented by this Date object, that is, the value of the [[PrimitiveValue]] internal property of this Date object.

Note specifically the bit that says "none of these functions are generic" which, unlike for String or Array, means that the methods cannot be applied to non-Dates.

Whether something is a Date depends on whether its [[Class]] is "Date". For your subclass the [[Class]] is "Object".

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Check out the MDC docs on Date specifically:

Note: Note that Date objects can only be instantiated by calling Date or using it as a constructor; unlike other JavaScript object types, Date objects have no literal syntax.

It seems like the Date object isn't really a JS object at all. When I was writing an extension library, I ended up doing the following:

function MyDate() {
   var _d=new Date();
   function init(that) {
      var i;
      var which=['getDate','getDay','getFullYear','getHours',/*...*/,'toString'];
      for (i=0;i<which.length;i++) {
         that[which[i]]=_d[which[i]]; 
      }
   }
   init(this);
   this.doSomething=function() {
    console.log("DO");
   }
}

At least I did that first. The limitations of the JS Date object in the end got the better of me and I switched to my own data storage approach (eg. why does getDate=day of year?)

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+1 For explaination and offering an alternate solution –  Chad May 20 '11 at 17:14

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