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I've got a stack of images. Those images are all added to a sprite container:

var container:Sprite = new Sprite();
container.addChild(img);//added in a loop
addChild(container);

Later, when I iterate through the container to remove the images I say:

for(var i:int=0;i<container.numChildren;i++)
{
     var currImg:Sprite = container.getChildAt(i) as Sprite;
     container.removeChild(currImg);
}

Only a part of the images are removed. If I trace container.numChildren I get the correct number of images to be removed. Did someone have the same problem ?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I've encountered this problem as well. What's actually wrong here is that you're stepping up through the display list AND cutting it down with each iteration. In AVM2 the display list depth is automatically managed in this context, and when you remove a child the rest of the display list depth is adjusted. Anyway, the solution is to wrap it up in a while loop:

while(container.numChildren > 0){
    container.removeChildAt(0);
}

Update

Also one note about your code. Try not to cast a new reference to the clip. This will cause issues for the garbage collection process in the flash VM, which is automated and only objects dereferenced or referenced using weak references will be cleaned up. So you can do one of the following:

for(var i:int=0;i<container.numChildren;i++)
{
     var currImg:Sprite = container.getChildAt(i) as Sprite;
     container.removeChild(currImg);
     currImg = null;
}

or

for(var i:int=0;i<container.numChildren;i++)
{
     container.removeChild(Sprite(container.getChildAt(i)));
}
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One other thing just about code that people are posting + your own code. In the for loop you are casting the variable "i" within the loop. Try to avoid this. Cast the int outside of the loop, so that you can access the "i" within the scope outside the for loop and nullify the reference after running your loop (that is, in the case that you're using the for loop. The while loop doesn't require this). –  Technik Empire May 20 '11 at 17:16
    
the "while" approach worked perfectly, thanks –  algro May 20 '11 at 17:50
    
the for loop would work if you changed getChildAt(i) to getChildAt(0) –  The_asMan May 20 '11 at 18:02
1  
@The_asMan - yes, using 0 would work, but if you do that you're not using the iterator i for anything, thus you might as well use a while loop. –  scunliffe May 20 '11 at 18:07
3  
I am a touch worried that this is the accepted answer; although correct the part about having the nullify the reference to the Sprite within the loop body to avoid Garbage Collection issues is absolute piffle; the reference is local to the enclosing function and will therefore fall out of scope at the end of the method body - adding code like that to your loop is just added noise! Finally; you really should be removing Children in reverse order (numChildren -> 0) to avoid the DisplayList having to collapse with each iteration of the loop. –  JonnyReeves May 21 '11 at 8:27

Try removing them in reverse order. It's possible that your're missing removals because you're trying to remove them while in a forward-bound loop.

for(var i:int=container.numChildren;i>=0;i--)
{
     var currImg:Sprite = container.getChildAt(i) as Sprite;
     container.removeChild(currImg);
}
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this is exactly his problem when he removes child at index 0 the child at index 1 shifts to index 0 and then on the next iteration of the loop he removes the child at index 1 leaving the child at index 0 –  The_asMan May 20 '11 at 17:46
1  
@The_asman Yes, but if you remove them starting at the highest number and then work down to 0, all of them will be removed (including the one in the 0th position). Try it. –  Michael Todd May 20 '11 at 17:48
    
Yes I was agreeing with you thats why I +1 lol was just pointing out why his broke. –  The_asMan May 20 '11 at 18:04
    
@The_asman (Ah, I misread your comment.) It's an easy thing to miss if you're not used to accessing elements in a collection numerically. –  Michael Todd May 20 '11 at 19:41

This code will work :

while(container.numChildren > 0)
{
    container.removeChildAt(0);
}

However I wanted to point out what is wrong with that loop so you understand what is happening. Add the trace I've added to your code below, into your code. :

for(var i:int=0;i<container.numChildren;i++)
{
     trace (i + " : " + container.numChildren);
     var currImg:Sprite = container.getChildAt(i) as Sprite;
     container.removeChild(currImg);
}

You'll see that each time through the loop the number of children decreases as expected.

But what you need to understand is that when a child is removed -- the display list of the container changes in a very significant way.

Here's an example of how your display list might look before running the loop -- the number I have on the front of these is their position on the container display list.

0-cat
1-dog
2-bird
3-cow
4-elephant
5-clown

Now, the first time through the loop, you remove cat cause it's location is 0 on the display list. Here's what the display list looks like now :

0-dog
1-bird
2-cow
3-elephant
4-clown

Notice that the display list indexes have shifted based on the removed child. There CANNOT be gaps on the display list by design.

so, the next time through the loop, the value of i is 1 -- right ? That means "bird" will be removed from the display list, as opposed to dog, which is what you might have expected.

so here's the display list after that next time through the loop :

0-dog
1-cow
2-elephant
3-clown

So, yes. Many of these solutions will work. In this case I'd recommend the while loop. But I think the real knowledge to be gained from this question is understanding the problem.

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Similar to @Michael's answer, your original code is missing removals because your "numChildren" size is reducing and your iterator is increasing on every loop:

As @Ascension Systems noted, this is the best approach.

while(container.numChildren > 0){
  container.removeChildAt(0);
}

However if you do want to do it in a loop, you'll need to do it in reverse.

for(var i:int=container.numChildren;i>=0;i--){
  container.removeChild(container.getChildAt(i));
}

To illustrate what happens in your original code, note the following example with 25 children:

If you remove in a forward loop this is what happens (on each iteration):

i:0 Array length:24
i:1 Array length:23
i:2 Array length:22
i:3 Array length:21
i:4 Array length:20
i:5 Array length:19
i:6 Array length:18
i:7 Array length:17
i:8 Array length:16
i:9 Array length:15
i:10 Array length:14
i:11 Array length:13
//the remaining 12 items never get looped over...
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