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Why is it so hard to do this in Java? If you want to have any kind of module system you need to be able to load jars dynamically. I'm told there's a way of doing it by writing your own ClassLoader, but that's a lot of work for something that should (in my mind at least) be as easy as calling a method with a jar file as its argument.

Any suggestions for simple code that does this?

P.S.: I know some see it as lame to answer your own questions, but I figured I'd do that so that a better one could bubble up past it.

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1  
I want to do the same but run the loaded jar in a more sandboxed environment (for security reasons obviously). For example, I want to block all network and filesystem access. –  Jus12 Feb 8 '12 at 18:51

9 Answers 9

up vote 75 down vote accepted

The reason it's hard is security. Classloaders are meant to be immutable; you shouldn't be able to willy-nilly add classes to it at runtime. I'm actually very surprised that works with the system classloader. Here's how you do it making your own child classloader:

URLClassLoader child = new URLClassLoader (myJar.toURL(), this.getClass().getClassLoader());
Class classToLoad = Class.forName ("com.MyClass", true, child);
Method method = classToLoad.getDeclaredMethod ("myMethod");
Object instance = classToLoad.newInstance ();
Object result = method.invoke (instance);

Painful, but there it is.

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7  
Only problem with this approach is that you need to know what classes are in what jars. As opposed to just loading a directory of jars and then instantiating classes. I am misunderstanding it? –  Allain Lalonde Sep 13 '08 at 19:13
2  
This method works great when running in my IDE, but when I build my JAR I get a ClassNotFoundException when calling Class.forName(). –  darrickc Jul 29 '09 at 16:50
9  
Using this approach you need to make sure you won't call this load method more than once for each class. Since you're creating a new class loader for every load operation, it can not know whether the class was already loaded previously. This can have bad consequences. For example singletons not working because the class was loaded several times and so the static fields exist several times. –  Eduard Wirch May 27 '11 at 10:11
    
I have tried to use methods like this to load jars dynamically at runtime, but I've been getting errors when it tries to load a class that depends upon other classes through import statements or other references. I made a separate question for it here earlier. Can anyone help? –  REALDrummer Oct 2 at 2:25

I found this solution a while back but it's so hackish I'm a little embarrassed to post it here, as it uses reflection to bypass encapsulation.

But... It works flawlessly.

public class ClassPathHack {
    private static final Class[] parameters = new Class[] {URL.class};

    public static void addFile(String s) throws IOException
    {
        File f = new File(s);
        addFile(f);
    }

    public static void addFile(File f) throws IOException
    {
        addURL(f.toURI().toURL());
    }

    public static void addURL(URL u) throws IOException
    {
        URLClassLoader sysloader = (URLClassLoader) ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
        Class sysclass = URLClassLoader.class;

        try {
            Method method = sysclass.getDeclaredMethod("addURL", parameters);
            method.setAccessible(true);
            method.invoke(sysloader, new Object[] {u});
        } catch (Throwable t) {
            t.printStackTrace();
            throw new IOException("Error, could not add URL to system classloader");
        }

    }
}
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4  
This is the only solution that actually works. And you're right: flawlessly. I'm just worried that Sun will patch this up. –  Paul Lammertsma Sep 7 '10 at 20:42
13  
This works great... however the issue with deprecated method f.toURL() can be overcome by using f.toURI().toURL() –  ria Mar 28 '12 at 9:43
    
Is there a reason not to initialize the method during the static construction of the ClassPathHack class? –  mark Sep 18 '12 at 16:05
    
Nope, just never did. Importing jars isn't something that's done frequently so it'd seems a premature optimization for my use. –  Allain Lalonde Sep 20 '12 at 15:19
13  
reflection to bypass encapsulation while using deprecated methods, pure hacker poetry, +1 –  raffian Aug 21 '13 at 1:16

You should take a look at OSGi, e.g. implemented in the Eclipse Platform. It does exactly that. You can install, uninstall, start and stop so called bundles, which are effectively JAR files. But it does a little more, as it offers e.g. services that can be dynamically discovered in JAR files at runtime.

Or see the specification for the Java Module System.

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Neat. I'm not sure how easy it'd be to retro-fit an application for it. But it sounds very promising. Thanks –  Allain Lalonde Sep 13 '08 at 19:08

How about the JCL class loader framework? I have to admit, I haven't used it, but it looks promising.

usage example:

JarClassLoader jcl = new JarClassLoader();  
jcl.add("myjar.jar"); //Load jar file  
jcl.add(new URL("http://myserver.com/myjar.jar")); //Load jar from a URL  
jcl.add(new FileInputStream("myotherjar.jar")); //Load jar file from stream  
jcl.add("myclassfolder/"); //Load class folder  
jcl.add("myjarlib/"); //Recursively load all jar files in the folder/sub-folder(s)  

JclObjectFactory factory = JclObjectFactory.getInstance();  

//Create object of loaded class  
Object obj = factory.create(jcl,"mypackage.MyClass");
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Thanks, exactly what I need, although it's a bit old hehe. –  Breno Inojosa Nov 27 at 12:27
    
It's also buggy and missing some important implementations i.e. findResources(...). Be ready to spend wonderful nights investigating why certain things don't work =) –  Tornn Dec 4 at 18:51

Here is a version that is not deprecated. I modified the original to remove the deprecated functionality.

/*
 * Created on Oct 6, 2004
 */
package tools;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.net.URL;
import java.net.URLClassLoader;

/**
 * Useful class for dynamically changing the classpath, adding classes during runtime. 
 */
public class ClasspathHacker {
    /**
     * Parameters of the method to add an URL to the System classes. 
     */
    private static final Class<?>[] parameters = new Class[]{URL.class};

    /**
     * Adds a file to the classpath.
     * @param s a String pointing to the file
     * @throws IOException
     */
    public static void addFile(String s) throws IOException {
        File f = new File(s);
        addFile(f);
    }

    /**
     * Adds a file to the classpath
     * @param f the file to be added
     * @throws IOException
     */
    public static void addFile(File f) throws IOException {
        addURL(f.toURI().toURL());
    }

    /**
     * Adds the content pointed by the URL to the classpath.
     * @param u the URL pointing to the content to be added
     * @throws IOException
     */
    public static void addURL(URL u) throws IOException {
        URLClassLoader sysloader = (URLClassLoader)ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader();
        Class<?> sysclass = URLClassLoader.class;
        try {
            Method method = sysclass.getDeclaredMethod("addURL",parameters);
            method.setAccessible(true);
            method.invoke(sysloader,new Object[]{ u }); 
        } catch (Throwable t) {
            t.printStackTrace();
            throw new IOException("Error, could not add URL to system classloader");
        }        
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException, SecurityException, ClassNotFoundException, IllegalArgumentException, InstantiationException, IllegalAccessException, InvocationTargetException, NoSuchMethodException{
        addFile("C:\\dynamicloading.jar");
        Constructor<?> cs = ClassLoader.getSystemClassLoader().loadClass("test.DymamicLoadingTest").getConstructor(String.class);
        DymamicLoadingTest instance = (DymamicLoadingTest)cs.newInstance();
        instance.test();
    }
}
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11  
I hate to bump an old thread, but I would like to point out that all content on stackoverflow is CC licensed. Your copyright statement is effectively ineffective. stackoverflow.com/faq#editing –  Huckle Jun 12 '12 at 16:17

The best I've found is org.apache.xbean.classloader.JarFileClassLoader which is part of the XBean project.

Here's a short method I've used in the past, to create a class loader from all the lib files in a specific directory

public void initialize(String libDir) throws Exception {
    File dependencyDirectory = new File(libDir);
    File[] files = dependencyDirectory.listFiles();
    ArrayList<URL> urls = new ArrayList<URL>();
    for (int i = 0; i < files.length; i++) {
        if (files[i].getName().endsWith(".jar")) {
        urls.add(files[i].toURL());
        //urls.add(files[i].toURI().toURL());
        }
    }
    classLoader = new JarFileClassLoader("Scheduler CL" + System.currentTimeMillis(), 
        urls.toArray(new URL[urls.size()]), 
        GFClassLoader.class.getClassLoader());
}

Then to use the classloader, just do:

classLoader.loadClass(name);
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If you are working on Android, the following code works:

String jarFile = "path/to/jarfile.jar";
DexClassLoader classLoader = new DexClassLoader(jarFile, "/data/data/" + context.getPackageName() + "/", null, getClass().getClassLoader());
Class<?> myClass = classLoader.loadClass("MyClass");
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I personally find that java.util.ServiceLoader does the job pretty well. You can get an example here.

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3  
ServiceLoader don't add jar files dynamically at runtime. jar files must be in classpath previously. –  angelcervera Jul 7 '12 at 18:09

The easiest way to do this is to set the required libraries in the MANIFEST.MF file in the JAR file and copy the files to a folder. E.g.:

Manifest-Version: 1.0

Class-Path: . DataModeler_lib/xxx.jar DataModeler_lib/mx_poi.jar

Main-Class: DataModelerApp

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