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This seems an obvious thing but I'm just not sure about the correct answer.

If I use an INSERT/UPDATE command in a single mysql query, can I get two different results from UNIX_TIMESTAMP? That is, does the time change during one query?

Example:

UPDATE my_table SET
time1 = UNIX_TIMESTAMP(),
...
...
time2 = UNIX_TIMESTAMP(),
...

Is it possible that time2 will be larger than time1?

(for anyone asking what good it is to set two columns to the same value - I'm using one for the time added and time updated so that I can sort just by one column)

If possible, provide some background information for your answer. Thanks!

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If I remember correctly, MySQL has special column types for "created" and "last updated" that are handled automatically. –  Teetrinker May 20 '11 at 19:59
    
The question is: have you seen this behavior on your system? –  AJ. May 20 '11 at 20:05
    
@Teetrinker, I'll take a look at it but I apply these times selectively, e.g. time added might not be the same as time created and time updated might not be the same as the time of the last update of that row, so that won't crack this. But thanks for the hint! –  Czechnology May 20 '11 at 20:07
    
@AJ, no I haven't seen it (yet) - I want to prevent later failures, that's why I'm asking beforehand. –  Czechnology May 20 '11 at 20:09
    
Seems I can't edit my comment, so please have a look at this page for details: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/timestamp.html –  Teetrinker May 20 '11 at 20:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

MySQL time & date functions return the time/date of the beginning of the statement, so if you do :

CREATE TABLE t ( x INT );
INSERT INTO t SELECT UNIX_TIMESTAMP() FROM (10M rows table)  -- takes several seconds
SELECT DISTINCT x FROM t;

DISTINCT returns one value, which correspond to the time when the INSERT began executing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that! What does the 10M do? I don't think I've ever seen that in a sql command. –  Czechnology May 20 '11 at 23:03
    
it's not SQL, it's English ;) i've used a 10 million rows table so the insert takes several seconds. –  peufeu May 21 '11 at 6:11
    
ah, ok :D thanks –  Czechnology May 21 '11 at 10:00

In mysql unix_timestamp() is similar to now() - it returns time when the statement began to execute and is different to sysdate() which returns time when the function itself is executed.

CREATE TABLE test ( date datetime, tstamp int(11) );
INSERT INTO test VALUES( 0,0 ), ( 0,0 ), ( 0,0 );
UPDATE test SET date=sysdate(), tstamp=unix_timestamp() WHERE !sleep(2);
+---------------------+------------+
| date                | tstamp     |
+---------------------+------------+
| 2011-05-20 22:39:58 | 1305923996 |
| 2011-05-20 22:40:00 | 1305923996 |
| 2011-05-20 22:40:02 | 1305923996 |
+---------------------+------------+
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+1 Thanks for your answer and example! –  Czechnology May 20 '11 at 23:04

I do not know the answer to your question. However, assuming your motivation is to get consistent timestamps when writing to the table, why not take the following approach: create a stored procedure. Inside the procedure, assign to a variable using UNIX_TIMESTAMP(), and execute your UPDATE or INSERT query using the variable, rather than further calls to UNIX_TIMESTAMP(). That way you are guaranteed the correct behaviour.

Example:

CREATE PROCEDURE "My_Insert_Procedure" ()
LANGUAGE SQL
NOT DETERMINISTIC
MODIFIES SQL DATA
SQL SECURITY DEFINER
BEGIN

DECLARE my_time DATETIME;
SET my_time = UNIX_TIMESTAMP();

UPDATE my_table SET
time1 = my_time,
...
...
time2 = my_time,
...

END

CALL My_Insert_Procedure();
share|improve this answer
    
Hammerite, thanks for your suggestion. I'm using php with MySQL, so the possibility of assigning the unix timestamp to a variable and then putting it in the query occured to me. My question is really a theoretical one, if it is possible to do this directly in a single SQL query or not. –  Czechnology May 20 '11 at 20:23

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