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I am trying to encode a simple String "test" back and forth.

    public static String encode(Key publicKey, String data) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {

        byte[] byteData = data.getBytes(); // convert string to byte array

        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance(ALGORITHM); // create conversion processing object
        cipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, publicKey); // initialize object's mode and key

        byte[] encryptedByteData = cipher.doFinal(byteData); // use object for encryption

        return new String(encryptedByteData); // convert encrypted byte array to string and return it

    }

    public static String decode(Key privateKey, String data) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException {

        byte[] byteData = data.getBytes(); // convert string to byte array

        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance(ALGORITHM); // create conversion processing object
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, privateKey); // initialize object's mode and key

        System.out.println(byteData.length);

        byte[] decryptedByteData = cipher.doFinal(byteData); // use object for decryption

        return new String(decryptedByteData); // convert decrypted byte array to string and return it

    }

However, although the encryption works just fine (ALGORITHM is "RSA"), when trying to decrypt the string I have just gotten from encrypting "test", I get following exception:

javax.crypto.IllegalBlockSizeException: Data must not be longer than 256 bytes

Should I split the encrypted bytes in chunks of 256 in order to be able to decrypt it?

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3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't reliably convert random bytes to a String. The results will depend on what your default character encoding is on the machine where you run this. With many encodings, the cipher text will be corrupted, and information will be lost.

Modify your code to use a byte[] instead (the result of the 'doFinal()` method.

If you need to convert the byte[] to a character string, use an encoding like Base-64.

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Ah, perfect, thanks, works perfectly! Yeah, I guess the corruption is when I convert the encrypted byte array to a String. –  arik May 20 '11 at 21:05
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From here:

The RSA algorithm can only encrypt data that has a maximum byte length of the RSA key length in bits divided with eight minus eleven padding bytes, i.e. number of maximum bytes = key length in bits / 8 - 11. If you want to encrypt larger data, then use a larger key, for example, a key with 4096 bits will allow you to encrypt 501 bytes of data.

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Although I have read the sentence in the very same wording as a Google search result, setting the key higher did not work for me. I tested the byte array length of the encryption and noticed that upon raising key length from 2048 to 4096 so did the byte array length, in neither case did it fit, in both cases I got the exception. –  arik May 20 '11 at 21:02
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If you have a long data, you should either split it to data chunks that fits and encrypt / decrypt each of them (not such a good idea) or encrypt / decrypt them using a symmetric algorithm (AES / DES / RC4 / etc.), encrypt the symmetric key with the RSA public key and send both to the other side. (much better idea).

The second approach is a very common approach, since asymmetric encryption algorithms are much more expensive than symmetric algorithms (for both encryption and decryption).

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Thanks. I'll do it when the data actually does exceed the limit, but that's not wherein the problem lay when encrypting such a simple string as "test". –  arik May 20 '11 at 21:12
    
Yeah, I misread your question, but I think it is a good advice for the future anyway. Good luck! –  MByD May 20 '11 at 21:15
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