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Is there an elegant way to find and replace any integers superior to 3 (as example) in a multidimensional array? The array may have the dimension 1, 2, 3, or more. Just an example of a such array:

[ [ [ 3, 3, 5 ], 
    [ 4, 3, 3 ] ], 
  [ [ 3, 2, 3 ], 
    [ 0, 3, 8 ] ] ]

I would like to do so without flatten the array.

share|improve this question
    
Replace with what? –  sawa May 20 '11 at 23:41
    
With the number 3 (because it's the maximum needed value in the example). –  Zag zag.. May 21 '11 at 8:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Following sepp2k idea, here is a possible implementation:

class Object
  def deep_map(&block)
    if self.respond_to? :each
      result = []
      self.each do |e|
        result << e.deep_map(&block)
      end
      return result
    else
      return block.call(self)
    end
  end  
end

Then apply deep_map as you wish on the array:

> [[[3, 3, 5], [4, 3, 3]], [[3, 2, 3], [0, 3, 8]]].deep_map { |e| e > 3 ? 0 : e }
=> [[[3, 3, 0], [0, 3, 3]], [[3, 2, 3], [0, 3, 0]]] 

Or, more briefly:

class Object
  def deep_map(&block)
    respond_to?(:map) ? map{|e| e.deep_map(&block)} : block.call(self)
  end
end

Or, polymorphically:

class Object
  def deep_map(&block); block.call(self) end
end

class Array
  def deep_map(&block); map{|e| e.deep_map(&block)} end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
@i-blis, I've added a shorter version of what you wrote, if you want it. –  Wayne Conrad May 20 '11 at 23:54
    
@Wayne, thanks. Let's keep both. –  i-blis May 21 '11 at 8:23
1  
each after map in the shorter version should be removed. –  sawa May 21 '11 at 8:52
2  
You can also do it polymorphically, as I added. –  sawa May 21 '11 at 8:57
1  
Thanks sawa. The shorter version is even more readable. The polymorphic solution is pretty elegant. I do not see this often in Ruby code – is this a popular coding idiom? –  i-blis May 21 '11 at 9:06

You can write a deep_map method, which calls map on the array and then for each element test whether it's a sub-array. If it is, call deep_map recursively with the sub-array, otherwise yield the element.

You can then use that deep_map method to transform the inner elements of your multi-dimensional array without affecting its structure.

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Thank you, @sepp2k! –  Zag zag.. May 21 '11 at 8:37

So, if I've done this right, f(x) will traverse a multidimensional Array until it finds one containing something that isn't an Array or subclass of Array, at which point it will yield the innermost Array to the block and replace it with the block's return value.

def f x, &block
  x.map do |a|
    if a.first.class.ancestors.include? Array
      f a, &block
    else
      yield a
    end
  end
end

p(f [ [ [ 3, 3, 5 ],
        [ 4, 3, 3 ] ],
      [ [ 3, 2, 3 ],
        [ 0, 3, 8 ] ] ] do |e|
    e.reject { |x| x > 3 }
  end
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, @DigitalRoss. Your code is very clean. But, because my question wasn't very clear, I would like to keep the array structure. Anyway, thanks again! –  Zag zag.. May 21 '11 at 8:41

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