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I'm having a very strange problem with p/invoke in C#. The unmanaged function I am trying to call has quite a few arguments (23), some of which are float arrays. Unfortunately I can't post the real code, but originally I was passing the float arrays into the function that makes the p/invoke call, something like this:

public void func()
{
    float[] a = new float[257];
    float[] b = new float[257];
    float[] c = new float[257];
    float[] d = new float[257];

    callDll(a, b, c, d);
}

[DllImport(DllName, EntryPoint="dllfunc", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern void dllfunc(ref float a, ref float b, ref float c, ref float d);

public void callDll(float[] a, float[] b, float[] c, float[] d)
{
    dllfunc(ref a[1], ref b[1], ref c[1], ref d[1]);
}

I know the way the arrays are passed is kind of strange, but this all worked fine. Then I decided to combine the float arrays into an object, so I changed it to something like this:

public class myObj
{
    float[] a;
    float[] b;
    float[] c;
    float[] d;
}

public void func()
{
    myObj m = new myObj();

    callDll(m);
}

[DllImport(DllName, EntryPoint="dllfunc", CharSet = CharSet.Ansi)]
public static extern void dllfunc(ref float a, ref float b, ref float c, ref float d);

public void callDll(myObj m)
{
    float[] a = new float[257];
    float[] b = new float[257];
    float[] c = new float[257];
    float[] d = new float[257];

    dllfunc(ref a[1], ref b[1], ref c[1], ref d[1]);

    m.a = a;
    m.b = b;
    m.c = c;
    m.d = d;
}

This runs once, and then crashes on every subsequent call with an error about Attempted to read or write protected memory. This is often an indication that other memory is corrupt. The odd behavior does seem like some sort of memory corruption issue, but I don't understand at all how changing the argument list for the function that wraps the p/invoke call could have this sort of effect. Does anyone have any ideas?

UPDATE: I rearranged the arguments some more and this problem seems to have gone away. It must have been something the unmanaged code was doing, I'm not sure what. I voted to close this question since it seems to have been a localized problem.

share|improve this question
    
could be a pinning problem ... do you know if the called lib keeps the references for later use? in this case your array's might already be garbage collected and therefore you get a nasty error like that one ... just an idea ... –  DarkSquirrel42 May 21 '11 at 1:07
    
Please show us the C++ code on the other side of the fence. –  David Heffernan May 21 '11 at 16:12
    
It's actually FORTRAN code, and I am unable to post it. It may be some sort of pinning problem, I didn't think that it was keeping any references but I'll have to double check. –  WildCrustacean May 23 '11 at 14:17

1 Answer 1

off by one? should

dllfunc(ref a[1], ref b[1], ref c[1], ref d[1]);

be

dllfunc(ref a[0], ref b[0], ref c[0], ref d[0]);
share|improve this answer
    
The reason I'm using 1 instead of 0 is that the function I'm calling is in FORTRAN and the array index starts with 1, so it is nice to keep the indexing consistent. I've tried it with 0 as well, like you suggest, but I get the same crash. –  WildCrustacean May 23 '11 at 14:17
    
then it may very well be a pinning problem... if your code really looks like what you have in your question those arrays aren't going to be around very long after the call to unmanaged code returns. –  Yaur May 23 '11 at 14:31
    
I'm sorry, I should have been more complete the first time. I am actually saving the arrays after calling the unmanaged code, I updated the question to reflect that. It still could be some sort of pinning problem though. –  WildCrustacean May 23 '11 at 15:24

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