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My use is pretty complicated. I have a bunch of objs and they are all passed around by ptr (not reference or value unless its an enum which is byval). At a specific point in time i like to call CheckMembers() which will check if each member has been set or is null. By default i cant make it all null because i wouldnt know if i set it to null or if it is still null bc i havent touch it since the ctor.

To assign a variable i still need the syntax to be the normal var = p; var->member = new Type;. I generate all the classes/members. So my question is how can i implement a property like feature where i can detect if the value has been set or left as the default?

I am thinking maybe i can use C++ with CLR/.NET http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z974bes2.aspx but i never used it before and have no idea how well it will work and what might break in my C++ prj (it uses rtti, templates, etc).

share|improve this question
6  
Have you considered using words like "because" rather than "bc", or "project" rather than "prj"? Or are you submitting your questions via a mobile phone? – Seth Johnson May 21 '11 at 1:55
    
@Seth, have you considered editing the question to fix them if it bothers you that badly? – bdonlan May 21 '11 at 2:21
    
The N1615 paper has a library solution for implementing properties. I'm not sure how well it meets your requirements, but implementing a property-like feature in C++ is definitely possible. At least the N1615 document can give you some hints. – In silico May 21 '11 at 3:12
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Reality (edit): this proved to be tricky, but the following code should handle your requirements. It uses a simple counter in the base class. The counter is incremented once for every property you wish to track, and then decremented once for every property that is set. The checkMembers() function only has to verify that the counter is equal to zero. As a bonus, you could potentially report how many members were not initialized.

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class PropertyBase
{
    public:
        int * counter;
        bool is_set;
};

template <typename T>
class Property : public PropertyBase
{
    public:
        T* ptr;
        T* operator=(T* src)
        {
            ptr = src;
            if (!is_set) { (*counter)--; is_set = true; }
            return ptr;
        }
        T* operator->() { return ptr; }
        ~Property() { delete ptr; }
};

class Base
{
    private:
        int counter;
    protected:
        void TrackProperty(PropertyBase& p)
        {
            p.counter = &counter;
            counter++;
        }
    public:
        bool checkMembers() { return (counter == 0); }
};

class OtherObject : public Base { }; // just as an example

class MyObject : public Base
{
    public:
        Property<OtherObject> x;
        Property<OtherObject> y;
        MyObject();
};

MyObject::MyObject()
{
    TrackProperty(x);
    TrackProperty(y);
}

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    MyObject * object1 = new MyObject();
    MyObject * object2 = new MyObject();

    object1->x = new OtherObject();
    object1->y = new OtherObject();

    cout << object1->checkMembers() << endl; // true
    cout << object2->checkMembers() << endl; // false

    delete object1;
    delete object2;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'll post some code in a bit. This looks like fun! – e.James May 21 '11 at 1:48
    
I was thinking about that. A bit more info, all objs are pass by ptr. So i'm sure func(T*p) { p->... would not call the overload since its a ptr and not a ref/val obj? However can i overload p->thisobj = val in some way? +1 btw – acidzombie24 May 21 '11 at 2:05
    
@acidzombie24: The code that I posted should work even through function calls. Each Property<T> member is really just a smart pointer with a bit of counting logic added in – e.James May 21 '11 at 3:20
    
One more added bonus: you can check each member's status: if (object1->x.is_set) ... – e.James May 21 '11 at 3:20
1  
I'm looking through the code now. The first thing i notice was if (ptr != NULL) { delete ptr; } Its allowed to call delete ptr while its null so that check is useless ;) – acidzombie24 May 21 '11 at 7:14

There are a number of ways to do this, with varying tradeoffs in terms of space overhead. For example, here's one option:

#include <iostream>

template<typename T, typename OuterClass>
class Property
{
public:
    typedef void (OuterClass::*setter)(const T &value);
    typedef T &value_type;
    typedef const T &const_type;
private:
    setter set_;
    T &ref_;
    OuterClass *parent_;
public:
    operator value_type() { return ref_; }
    operator const_type() const { return ref_; }

    Property<T, OuterClass> &operator=(const T &value)
    {
        (parent_->*set_)(value);
        return *this;
    }

    Property(T &ref, OuterClass *parent, setter setfunc)
        : set_(setfunc), ref_(ref), parent_(parent)
    { }
};


struct demo {
    private:
        int val_p;
        void set_val(const int &newval) {
            std::cout << "New value: " << newval << std::endl;
            val_p = newval;
        }

    public:
        Property<int, demo> val;

        demo()
            : val(val_p, this, &demo::set_val)
        { }
};

int main() {
    demo d;
    d.val = 42;
    std::cout << "Value is: " << d.val << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

It's possible to get less overhead (this has up to 4 * sizeof(void*) bytes overhead) using template accessors - here's another example:

#include <iostream>


template<typename T, typename ParentType, typename AccessTraits>
class Property
{
private:
    ParentType *get_parent()
    {
        return (ParentType *)((char *)this - AccessTraits::get_offset());
    }
public:
    operator T &() { return AccessTraits::get(get_parent()); }
    operator T() { return AccessTraits::get(get_parent()); }
    operator const T &() { return AccessTraits::get(get_parent()); }
    Property &operator =(const T &value) {
        AccessTraits::set(get_parent(), value);
        return *this;
    }
};

#define DECL_PROPERTY(ClassName, ValueType, MemberName, TraitsName) \
    struct MemberName##__Detail : public TraitsName { \
        static ptrdiff_t get_offset() { return offsetof(ClassName, MemberName); }; \
    }; \
    Property<ValueType, ClassName, MemberName##__Detail> MemberName;

struct demo {
    private:
        int val_;

        struct AccessTraits {
            static int get(demo *parent) {
                return parent->val_;
            }

            static void set(demo *parent, int newval) {
                std::cout << "New value: " << newval << std::endl;
                parent->val_ = newval;
            }
        };
    public:
        DECL_PROPERTY(demo, int, val, AccessTraits)

        demo()
        { val_ = 0; }
};

int main() {
    demo d;
    d.val = 42;
    std::cout << "Value is: " << (int)d.val << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This only consumes one byte for the property struct itself; however, it relies on unportable offsetof() behavior (you're not technically allowed to use it on non-POD structures). For a more portable approach, you could stash just the this pointer of the parent class in a member variable.

Note that both classes are just barely enough to demonstrate the technique - you'll want to overload operator* and operator->, etc, as well.

share|improve this answer
    
i'm still reading the code but i dont need less overhead. I can just toggle the generation with a switch and only use this in debug. – acidzombie24 May 21 '11 at 2:06
    
Excellent. I think this will work just fine. I'll try it within 24hrs :) – acidzombie24 May 21 '11 at 2:14
    
I added my own light weight version as an answer. I wont mark any solution as correct. I notice you did the more complex property where you can set you own getter/setter. Nice touch (my doesnt support that) – acidzombie24 May 21 '11 at 8:16
2  
Yes, it's easier to implement if you let the property class contain the backing value - but I enjoyed the challenge :) – bdonlan May 21 '11 at 16:56

Here's my temporary alternative. One that doesn't ask for constructor parameters.

#include <iostream>
#include <cassert>

using namespace std;

template <class T>
class Property
{
    bool isSet;
    T v;
    Property(Property&p) { }
public:
    Property() { isSet=0; }
    T operator=(T src) { v = src; isSet = 1; return v; }
    operator T() const { assert(isSet); return v; }
    bool is_set() { return isSet; }
};

class SomeType  {};
enum  SomeType2 { none, a, b};
class MyObject
{
public:
    Property<SomeType*> x;
    Property<SomeType2> y;
    //This should be generated. //Consider generating ((T)x)->checkMembers() when type is a pointer
    bool checkMembers() { return x.is_set() && y.is_set(); }
};

int main(int argc, char * argv[])
{
    MyObject* p = new MyObject();
    p->x = new SomeType;
    cout << p->checkMembers() << endl; // false
    p->y = a;
    cout << p->checkMembers() << endl; // true
    delete p->x;
    delete p;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 looks clean to me. – e.James May 21 '11 at 8:21

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