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I'd like to debug this code but I guess "printing a log to screen or file" is fine for me.

How should I print a log in php code? The usual print/printf seems to go to HTML output not the console.

I have apache server executing the PHP code.

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Is your script running in a web browser or in a console (aka parsed using php.exe rather than apache/iis)? –  danielrsmith May 21 '11 at 3:56
    
You should look at this question, has a bit of useful logging code: stackoverflow.com/questions/5769537/… –  Ben May 21 '11 at 3:57
    
you can use echo $variable –  Ibu May 21 '11 at 3:59
    
what language are you comming from? Just so you php is very different then other compiled languages –  Ibu May 21 '11 at 4:02
    
@lbu: indeed.. I didn't expect, printf question would get this many upvotes... –  eugene Oct 24 at 12:44

13 Answers 13

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You need to change your frame of mind. You are writing PHP, not whatever else it is that you are used to write. Debugging in PHP is not done in a console environment.

In PHP, you have 3 categories of debugging solutions:

  1. Output to a webpage (see dBug library for a nicer view of things).
  2. Write to a log file
  3. In session debugging with xDebug

Learn to use those instead of trying to make PHP behave like whatever other language you are used to.

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14  
As one who spends a lot of time writing console apps and various non web scripts, I will politely disagree with that. –  stefgosselin May 21 '11 at 12:33
    
@Stefgosselin: why do you disagree? Do you debug PHP using a console environment? How do you do it and what would be the advantages over xDebug? I may be missing something, but your disagreement doesn't make a whole lot of sense for now. –  Sylverdrag May 21 '11 at 14:03
    
I do work a lot maintaining and developping console applications and in my bad english interpretation of the question had assumed he was looking to debug a console app. Xdebug is fine and very handy though I do like debugging info right in my editor –  stefgosselin May 23 '11 at 1:14
    
@Stefgosselin: Netbeans does pretty much the same, although the best I have seen with xDebug was with Aptana. –  Sylverdrag May 29 '11 at 5:23

A lesser known trick is that mod_php maps stderr to the Apache log. And, there is a stream for that, so file_put_contents('php://stderr', print_r($foo, TRUE)) will nicely dump the value of $foo into the Apache error log.

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2  
+1: Was completely unaware of that. Nice :) –  Demian Brecht May 21 '11 at 4:30
    
+ oned for mentionning that, btw you can also set the value of error_log to 'php://stdout' when debugging a console app and have the error messages appear straight to console, ie: error_log("You messed up!", 3, "php://stdout"); –  stefgosselin May 21 '11 at 12:38
    
can I print a formatted string? –  eugene May 23 '11 at 7:31
    
+1: what they said. –  PapaFreud Feb 29 '12 at 9:00
    
so cool. helps a lot, even supports arrays and PHP_EOL –  Brock Hensley Aug 17 '13 at 4:29
error_log(print_r($variable, TRUE)); 

might be useful

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You can use error_log to send to your servers error log file (or an optional other file if you'd like)

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LiveOutput.com

I use this site all the time when debugging php code. You can log messages to this website in a few lines of code, the same way you would log messages to a log file. The messages are pushed to your screen in realtime.

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If you don't want to integrate a framework like Zend, then you can use the trigger_error method to log to the php error log.

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Are you debugging on console? There are various options for debugging PHP. The most common function used for quick & dirty debugging is var_dump.

That being said and out of the way, although var_dump is awesome and a lot of people do everything with just that, there are other tools and techniques that can spice it up a bit.

Things to help out if debugging in a webpage, wrap <pre> </pre> tags around your dump statement to give you proper formatting on arrays and objects.

Ie:

<div> some html code ....
      <a href="<?php $tpl->link;?>">some link to test</a>
</div>

      dump $tpl like this:

    <pre><?php var_dump($tpl); ?></pre>

And, last but not least make sure if debugging your error handling is set to display errors. Adding this at the top of your script may be needed if you cannot access server configuration to do so.

error_reporting(E_ALL);
ini_set('display_errors', '1');

Good luck!

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If you are on Linux:

file_put_contents('your_log_file', 'your_content');

or

error_log ('your_content', 3, 'your_log_file');

and then in console

tail -f your_log_file

This will show continuously the last line put in the file.

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You can use the php curl module to make calls to http://liveoutput.com/. This works great in an secure, corporate environment where certain restrictions in the php.ini exists that restrict usage of file_put_contents.

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This a great tool for debugging & logging php: PHp Debugger & Logger

It works right out of the box with just 3 lines of code. It can send messages to the js console for ajax debugging and can replace the error handler. It also dumps information about variables like var_dump() and print_r(), but in a more readable format. Very nice tool!

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Simply way is trigger_error:

 trigger_error("My error");

but you can't put arrays or Objects therefore use

var_dump
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trigger_error is probably the best way to write to your error logs. You will thank yourself when you want to modify say the log lines with some custom data later. –  Anshul Aug 3 '12 at 4:52

I have used many of these, but since I usually need to debug when developing, and since I develop on localhost, I have followed the advice of others and now write to the browser's JavaScript debug console (see http://www.codeforest.net/debugging-php-in-browsers-javascript-console).

That means that I can look at the web page which my PHP is generating in my browser & press F12 to quickly show/hide any debug trace.

Since I am constantly looking at the developer tools for debugger, CSS layout, etc, it makes sense to look at my PHP loggon there.

If anyone does decide to us that code, I made one minor change. After

function debug($name, $var = null, $type = LOG) {

I added

$name = 'PHP: ' . $name;

This is because my server side PHP generates HTML conatining JavaScript & I find it useful to distinguish between output from PHP & JS.

(Note: I am currently updating this to allow me to switch on & off different output types: from PHP, from JS, and database access)

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You can use

<?php
{
    AddLog("anypage.php","reason",ERR_ERROR);
}
?>

or if you want to print that statement in an log you can use

AddLog("anypage.php","string: ".$string,ERR_DEBUG_LOW);
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4  
AddLog? This isn't a native function. –  stefgosselin May 21 '11 at 12:42

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