Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I keep on getting this error when running one of my scripts;

PHP Fatal error: Allowed memory size of 1073741824 bytes exhausted (tried to allocate 71 bytes) in ... lib/symfony-1.4.11/lib/plugins/sfDoctrinePlugin/lib/vendor/doctrine/Doctrine/Connection/Statement.php on line 246, ...

The following is the stripped-down version of the script that's triggering the error;

public function executeImportFile(sfWebRequest $request)
{
 ini_set('memory_limit', '1024M');
 set_time_limit ( 0 );

 //more codes here...

 $files = scandir($workspace.'/'.$directory);

 foreach ($files as $file) {
   $path = $workspace.'/'.$directory.'/'.$file;

   if ($file != "." && $file != "..") {
     $this->importfile($path);
   }
 }
}


protected function importfile($path){


 $connection =
sfContext::getInstance()->getDatabaseManager()->getDatabase('doctrine')->getDoctrineConnection();
 $connection->beginTransaction();
 try {

   //more codes here...


   while ($data = $reader->read()) //reads each line of a csv file
   {
     // send the line to another private function to be processed
     // and then write to database
     $this->writewave($data);
   }


   $connection->commit();

 } catch (Exception $e) {
   $connection->rollback();
 }
}

What the script does is basically to read all the csv files in a folder (which contains tens of thousands of lines each), process it, and the write it to the database using Doctrine's transaction.

While I don't think I need to set the memory limit and the time limit in both functions, the script quits as Doctrine uses up all the the allocated 1GB of memory.

It will normally stop after processing 10 files, and allocating more memory will allow it to process a bit more files, and will still crash.

Is there anything that I'm missing here that's causing the memory not to free up after processing each files?

Mohd Shakir Zakaria http://www.mohdshakir.net

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Look to free any objects wherever you can, including query/connection objects, particularly when they're inside loops.

http://docs.doctrine-project.org/projects/doctrine1/en/latest/en/manual/improving-performance.html#free-objects

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I tried freeing the the objects and it solves my problem :) –  Mohd Shakir Zakaria May 22 '11 at 16:02
    
Great... please mark the answer as accepted if it did the trick. –  Tom May 22 '11 at 17:52
    
Has anybody tried compiling Doctrine from within Symfony? any pointers to such a solution –  Prasad May 29 '11 at 10:42
    
@Prasad I'm coming late to the party, but I'll leave a reply for future reference. In Symfony "unset" won't work. You have to detach your the entities from the EntityManager via $em->detach() followed by $em->clear(), and then force PHP's garbage collector to work with gc_enable(); and gc_collect_cycles() this is particularly useful when you're using doctrine within a loop. Just watch out with mapped and inversed relationships because using $em->detach() or $em->clear() too soon will cause cascading issues with your entities! –  AlanChavez Nov 21 '13 at 14:22
    
Thank you Alan! –  Prasad Dec 2 '13 at 8:46
add comment

Doctrine uses notoriously much memory when working with large datasets - importing large/multiple files is not possible this way.

Even though you import each file in their separate function call, doctrine has an internal object cache so they do not get freed.

Your best option would be to modify the task a bit, so it accepts a filename as parameter. If it's passed, process only that file (hoping it won't get too big). If no filename is passed, it loops through all the files like now, and calls itself via exec, so it's a different process and the memory really gets freed.

share|improve this answer
    
I am about to do something similar to the OP - I don't really see my need for Doctrine - am I going to run into problems using a PDO connection ? –  ManseUK May 21 '11 at 20:24
    
Nope, PDO has no object cache like doctrine does. –  Maerlyn May 21 '11 at 20:50
    
Thanks ... So maybe thats an option for the OP ? –  ManseUK May 21 '11 at 20:55
    
Depends - if he needs business logic contained in his models, definitely no. In general, different processes every few thousand records is the best answer. –  Maerlyn May 21 '11 at 21:32
add comment

the biggest issue I see in your script, is that your calling sfcontext really often. IMHO sfcontext is not a singleton, which means you create a new instance every loop. couldn't you pass the connection into the method?

public function executeImportFile(sfWebRequest $request)
{
 ini_set('memory_limit', '1024M');
 set_time_limit ( 0 );


$connection = sfContext::getInstance()->getDatabaseManager()->getDatabase('doctrine')->getDoctrineConnection();

 //more codes here...

 $files = scandir($workspace.'/'.$directory);

 foreach ($files as $file) {
   $path = $workspace.'/'.$directory.'/'.$file;

   if ($file != "." && $file != "..") {
     $this->importfile($path, $connection);
   }
 }
}


protected function importfile($path, $connection){
 $connection->beginTransaction();
 try {

   while ($data = $reader->read()) //reads each line of a csv file
   {
     $this->writewave($data);
   }
  $connection->commit();

 } catch (Exception $e) {
   $connection->rollback();
 }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
sfContext is a singleton, see sfContext source –  Maerlyn May 21 '11 at 11:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.