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$GLOBALS["items"] = array('one', 'two', 'three', 'four', 'five' ,'six', 'seven');
$alter = &$GLOBALS["items"]; // Comment this line
foreach($GLOBALS["items"] as $item) {
  echo get_item_id();
}

function get_item_id(){
  var_dump(key($GLOBALS["items"]));
}

Check output of this code, with commented and uncommented second line. My result(PHP 5.3.0). With second line

int(1) int(2) int(3) int(4) int(5) int(6) NULL

Without second line:

int(1) int(1) int(1) int(1) int(1) int(1) int(1)

Why so strange result?

share|improve this question
2  
I'm honest.. I have no idea.. getting the pointer of $GLOBALS shouldn't change the variable. –  Henrik P. Hessel May 21 '11 at 9:44
2  
Nice hack. Apparently $alter takes over control. If you set $alter to NULL after assigning the array, the array becomes invalid even, and causes an error in the following loop. –  GolezTrol May 21 '11 at 9:45
2  
It may have something to do with the fact that $GLOBALS really is an array of references itself. And references in PHP are always funky. –  BoltClock May 21 '11 at 9:52
    
@BoltClock, you can replace $GLOBALS to another array variable, and this hack works too))) –  plutov.by May 21 '11 at 9:56
    
I fail to see why this should be a "hack". What is the advantage? Imo it is either a bug, weird behaviour or can be explained. –  Felix Kling May 21 '11 at 10:01
show 2 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Here is a possible explanation:

We know that foreach always loops over a copy of the array if it is not referenced:

Unless the array is referenced, foreach operates on a copy of the specified array and not the array itself. foreach has some side effects on the array pointer.

That means that the internal pointer of the original array is not changed and key() will always return the same value (as we can see when we comment out the line). And indeed if we do a var_dump($GLOBALS), we get:

 ["items"]=>
  array(7) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "one"
    [1]=>
    string(3) "two"
    [2]=>
    string(5) "three"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "four"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "five"
    [5]=>
    string(3) "six"
    [6]=>
    string(5) "seven"
  }

(no reference)

But as soon as we generate a reference to the array (with $alter), $GLOBALS['items'] becomes a reference too, because both entries have to point to the same array:

 ["items"]=>
  &array(7) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "one"
    [1]=>
    string(3) "two"
    [2]=>
    string(5) "three"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "four"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "five"
    [5]=>
    string(3) "six"
    [6]=>
    string(5) "seven"
  }
  ["alter"]=>
  &array(7) {
    [0]=>
    string(3) "one"
    [1]=>
    string(3) "two"
    [2]=>
    string(5) "three"
    [3]=>
    string(4) "four"
    [4]=>
    string(4) "five"
    [5]=>
    string(3) "six"
    [6]=>
    string(5) "seven"
  }

Hence, the foreach loop does iterate over the original array and changes the internal pointer, which affects key().


To sum up: It is a problem with references, not with $GLOBALS.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, now i'm understand) –  Kein May 21 '11 at 10:14
    
+1 I'm imagine some poor guy who's trying to change values of this copied array in a foreach loop. –  Henrik P. Hessel May 21 '11 at 10:24
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