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Possible Duplicates:
Is this keyword optional when accessing members in C#?
When do you use the “this” keyword?

class Program
    {
        public class Demo
        {
            int age;
            string name;

            public Demo(int age, string name)
            {

                // 'THIS' KEYWORD IS ADDED IN THESE TWO LINES THEN ONLY IT WORKS
                age = age;
                name = name;
             }

            public void Show()
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Your age is :" + age.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine("Your name is : " + name);
            }
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int SENDage;
            string SENDname;

            Console.WriteLine("Enter your age : " );
            SENDage=Int32.Parse(Console.ReadLine());

            Console.WriteLine("Enter your name : ");
            SENDname=Console.ReadLine();

            Demo obj = new Demo(SENDage, SENDname);

            obj.Show();
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

I found this reason , but can anyone please explain it to me?

Local data members age , name have precedence over instance members.

I am not able to understand it.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Henk Holterman, Frédéric Hamidi, Cody Gray, Mat, McDowell May 22 '11 at 16:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
it should work without this in your above example –  naveen May 21 '11 at 11:11
    
are you sure? i tried this exact code in: 2.0, 3.0, 3.5 and 4.0 and each time it worked absolutely fine. what are you using? –  peteisace May 21 '11 at 11:11
    
The code as-is works fine, there is no need to use this here at all. –  Henk Holterman May 21 '11 at 11:11
1  
If you're actually asking why the this keyword is part of the C# language in the first place, well, you need a way to express a reference to the current object, e.g. in order to pass it to other methods, or return it from your own. –  Frédéric Hamidi May 21 '11 at 11:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your code the parameter name age and class member age are of same name.

public class Demo
{
     int age;
     string name;

     public Demo(int age, string name)
     {
          age = age;
          name = name;
     }

     .....
}

When your code executes the constructor, it first searches for the local variable and then searches for the class variables. Since it gets the age and name both as local variable it reassigns the value back to it self.

Now if you use this keyword for assigning values, this keyword refers to the current object and hence assigns the value to the object.

public class Demo
{
     int age;
     string name;

     public Demo(int age, string name)
     {
          this.age = age;
          this.name = name;
     }

     .....
}
share|improve this answer

In this situation the this keyword would not be required. It is only necessary when the following declaration is changed:

int a;
string n;

Into

int age;
string name;

To use the class variable instead of the argument to the constructor you would then have to assign it with this:

        public Demo(int age, string name){
            this.age = age;
            this.name = name;
         }
share|improve this answer
1  
the 'local members' would be the arguments that are passed to your function (in this case the constructor). –  Mr47 May 21 '11 at 11:31
1  
Yes; when you do not use the this keyword, using age or name will access the variables that were passed as arguments; thus they will be filled with the values provided to the constructor. –  Mr47 May 21 '11 at 11:41
1  
The variable before the assignment operator must be the global variable (class-level field), so you must add this. The way you wrote it will assign the value of the argument right back to the same variable (the argument) and not to the global variable (class level field). –  Mr47 May 21 '11 at 11:48
1  
this is a reference to the instance of the class you are currently executing code in. So this.name refers to the field of the object; while name refers to the argument to your constructor. this thus allows you to indicate that you require the variable name within the scope of this as opposed to the standard local scope (the function in which you are executing code; your constructor). –  Mr47 May 21 '11 at 11:53
1  
this does refer to obj, but from inside the object itself. Your local variables (the arguments to your constructor) are destroyed the moment you leave the constructor. So you put your values in the class fields by using this, so you can fetch the content of these fields in your show method. –  Mr47 May 21 '11 at 12:01

This code runs just fine for me when I copy-paste it into a console application.

What do you mean by "this" keyword is required? doesn't it compile? what version of Visual Studio are you using?

Alternatively, Is this the whole code or just a demo you made portraying the problem? From the error message it seems like you have "age" and "name" defined somewhere else, perhaps "a" and "n" were previously called "age" and "name"?

share|improve this answer
    
He means to say "What is the use of this keyword in the constructor" ?, It's just that he hasn't framed his question properly. –  Searock May 21 '11 at 14:45

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