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I have a data frame called "newprice" (see below) and I want to change the column names in my program in R.

> newprice
   Chang.  Chang.   Chang.
1     100       36      136
2     120      -33       87
3     150       14      164

In fact this is what am doing:

names(newprice)[1]<-paste("premium")
names(newprice)[2]<-paste("change")
names(newprice)[3]<-paste("newprice") 

I have not put this in a loop because I want each column name to be different as you see.

When I paste my program into R console this is the output it gives me:

> names(newprice)[1]<-paste(“premium”)
Error: unexpected input in "names(newprice)[1]<-paste(“"
> names(newprice)[2]<-paste(“change”)
Error: unexpected input in "names(newprice)[2]<-paste(“"
> names(newprice)[3]<-paste(“newpremium”)
Error: unexpected input in "names(newprice)[3]<-paste(“"

I have equally tried using the c() function-for example c("premium"), instead of the paste() function, but to no avail.

Could someone help me to figure this out? I need it seriously in my program.

many thanks to all in advance

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If Dirk's answer works then the problem was that you were working with a matrix rather than with a dataframe. You can check this with either is.matrix or str. –  BondedDust May 21 '11 at 12:17
6  
You asked 5 questions now and didn't accept one answer, although it has been asked already more than once. Pepole won't keep helping you if you don't start accepting answers. –  Joris Meys May 21 '11 at 15:02
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6 Answers

Use the colnames() function:

R> X <- data.frame(bad=1:3, worse=rnorm(3))
R> X
  bad     worse
1   1 -2.440467
2   2  1.320113
3   3 -0.306639
R> colnames(X) <- c("good", "better")
R> X
  good    better
1    1 -2.440467
2    2  1.320113
3    3 -0.306639
R> 

You can also subset:

R> colnames(X)[2] <- "superduper"
R> 
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3  
Here are 15 or more characters just for one smiley –  mdsumner May 21 '11 at 13:23
    
Hi Dirk, many thanks I think it will now work perfectly. –  Son May 21 '11 at 19:04
1  
@Dirk Why not using names() instead of colnames()? –  Antoine Lizée Oct 10 '13 at 6:40
    
Great! You can also subset multiple columns at once (useful on big data frames). colnames(X)[c(1,2)] <- c("good", "better") –  kermit666 Nov 13 '13 at 12:07
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The error is caused by the "smart-quotes" (or whatever they're called). The lesson here is, "don't write your code in an 'editor' that converts quotes to smart-quotes".

names(newprice)[1]<-paste(“premium”)  # error
names(newprice)[1]<-paste("premium")  # works

Also, you don't need paste("premium") (the call to paste is redundant) and it's a good idea to put spaces around <- to avoid confusion (e.g. x <- -10; if(x<-3) "hi" else "bye"; x).

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Hello Joshua, you comment about "smart-quotes" is very true. many thanks. –  Son May 21 '11 at 19:07
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Did you try just:

names(newprice)[1]<-"premium"

?

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Hi Jamie, many thanks for your help –  Son May 21 '11 at 19:07
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I use this:

colnames(dataframe)[which(names(dataframe) == "columnName")] <- "newColumnName"

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Thank you. I think this is somehow annoying with R: Why is it so difficult to change the column name if you do not want to use the index number but the old name :( –  Arne Mar 18 at 14:41
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You can just do the editing by:

newprice <- edit(newprice)

and change the column name manually.

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try:

names(newprice) <- c("premium", "change", "newprice")
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