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#include<stdio.h>
void f(int a)
{
printf("%d", a);
}
#define f(a) {}

int main()
{
 /* call f : function */
}

How to call f (the function)? Writing f(3) doesn't work because it is replaced by {}

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1  
Not stupid. Suppose you have a macro implementing an inline replacement for f in its header file, and you want to use this macro to define the external implementation in the implementation file. This is a standard practice. –  R.. May 21 '11 at 12:30
    
It is stupid as an interview question. I wouldn't like to work for a company that needs this. –  Bo Persson May 21 '11 at 13:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Does (f)(3); work?

The C preprocessor doesn't expand the macro f inside ( ).


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3  
Could you explain why this works? –  Jesse Emond May 21 '11 at 12:29
3  
I disagree that it's silly. This is a technique any C programmer intending to use the preprocessor should know. –  R.. May 21 '11 at 12:31
3  
@Prasoon: Its arrogance to call the question "silly". Just because you know the answer, doesn't make it "silly". –  Nawaz May 21 '11 at 12:36
2  
because macro f needs to be in the form f(something) for C pre-processor to do replacement. –  Nyan May 21 '11 at 12:36
1  
"The C preprocessor doesn't expand the macro f inside ( )." #define FOO 3 printf("%d\n",(FOO) ); works . ;) –  Nyan May 21 '11 at 12:50
int main()
{
#undef f  // clear f!
 f(3);
}
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1  
After undef macro is gone! –  Nyan May 21 '11 at 12:49
    
@Nyan, and you downvoted for that :). Questioner hasn't mentioned such condition. Take the case if the macro is defined in one common header file and being used in several other files. For the files you don't want to use that, you will simply #undef it. –  iammilind May 21 '11 at 12:53
4  
+1 for writing a correct answer that will probably annoy the interviewer! –  Raynos May 21 '11 at 19:38
    
This is so destructive that it indeed seems fairly obvious that the OP wants to keep the macro unless otherwise stated, not the other way around. Otherwise, in his testcase, why begin with the macro defined at all? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 11 '12 at 12:36

Use function pointer to achieve this:

int main() {
    void (*p)(int a);
    p = f;
    p(3); //--> will call f(3)
    return 0;
}
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One solution is posted by @Prasoon, another could be just introducing another name for the function, IF you can't change the function's name, neither the macro's name:

#include<stdio.h>
void f(int a)
{
   printf("%d", a);
}


#define fun (f) //braces is necessary 

#define f(a) {}

int main()
{
     fun(100);
}

Online demo : http://www.ideone.com/fbTcE

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How to call f (aren't we calling fun here ? Because if calling fun was ok then we can change the name of the function f() to fun(). :) ) –  iammilind May 21 '11 at 12:45
    
@iammilind: fun is not function, preprocessor replaces it with f (the actual function). –  Nawaz May 21 '11 at 12:46

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