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I am having a problem in calling multiple buttons at the same time because each buttons works a different process there are more than 78 folders.

I want to call all the buttons at the same time in a single button called button4. Now it's calling button1 only and not working for button2.

Is there any way to call these buttons at the same time?

My code is:

    private void button4_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        button1.PerformClick();
        button2.PerformClick();


    }

Thanks in Advance.

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I'd say it is commonly not a good idea to actually 'click' buttons. You should probably go and call the event handling methods of the respective buttons –  yas4891 May 21 '11 at 12:59
    
what is the onClick of button1? –  eyalb May 21 '11 at 12:59
    
Can u pls tell me where i shold change , I am new in c# –  user762097 May 21 '11 at 13:00
    
I've added an answer with some example code. –  yas4891 May 21 '11 at 13:03
1  
The code shown works perfectly. If button 2 is not getting "clicked", check to make sure that it is enabled (set the Enabled property to true). –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 14:18

4 Answers 4

You should in general not perform UI-style clicks on other buttons in order to invoke their behaviour.

Just call the respective event handling methods of the buttons you would like to "click".

example code:

private void button4_Click_1(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
   button1_Click_1(null, EventArgs.Empty);
   button2_Click_1(null, EventArgs.Empty);
   // and so on
}
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2  
or EventArgs.Empty. –  Ben Voigt May 21 '11 at 13:09
    
@Ben you just taught me something. Thanks for that! –  yas4891 May 21 '11 at 13:11
    
Thanks sir , It working well –  user762097 May 21 '11 at 14:01
    
Uhh, what? Why not? Why shouldn't we do this? What's wrong with the PerformClick() method? This is exactly what it was intended for. –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 14:14
    
@Cody: Why should you want to put a Message into MessageQueue, wait an undefined time for the UI Thread to invoke another button's event handler? Especially if you are able to get the same effect from a simple method call. Or to quote a famous aphorism: "All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection" –  yas4891 May 22 '11 at 9:41

You should refactor the other events to call well-named methods.

Say button1 does some initialization; it should look like this:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Initialize();
}

Say button2 finalizes that intialization; it should look like this:

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    FinalizeInitialization();
}

Then if button4 does all of this; it should look like this:

private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Initialize();
    FinalizeInitialization();

    WhateverElseButton4ShouldDo();
}
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Under most circumstances, you shouldn't call PerformClick() at all. Instead, you should call the same methods your event handlers call. So, if clicking button 3 should behave as click clicking button 1 and then button 2, you should have code like this:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SomeAction();
}

private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    AnotherAction();
}

private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    SomeAction();
    AnotherAction();
}

(As a side note, your buttons should have descriptive names, not button1 and the like.)

share|improve this answer
    
Same comment as that to yas4891's answer: why should we not call the PerformClick() method? Why is calling the event handler method directly the better option? –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 14:15
    
@Cody, note that in my code, I'm not calling the event handler, but some method that is also called by the event handler. That's because you probably don't want to actually click the button. You want to do the same thing clicking the button currently does. But in the future, you might want for example to remove button 2, but keep button 3 with its current functionality. In other words, you don't want to say “do the same thing button 1 does”, you want to say “do X”, where X is what button 1 currently does. –  svick May 21 '11 at 14:22
    
Yeah, you're right. The design you show (refactoring the logic out into a separate method, called both by the event handler and your code) is preferable to either of the two alternatives. Didn't read the code sample closely enough, I guess. –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 14:23

We can't say what those button click handlers do. So it's hard to say what's wrong. But try moving the code away from button click handlers. Create some class that contains code that should run after button click. Then call this class' methods from button click handlers. It will be easier to debug and test that code.

    public class ButtonActions
    {
        public void DoSomething() {...}
        public void DoSomething2() {...}
        public void DoSomething3() {...}

        public void DoAll()
        {
            DoSomething();
            DoSomething2();
            DoSomething3();
        }

    }

    // here instead of clicking all buttons call method that does it all
    protected void button_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        var buttonActions = new ButtonActions();
        buttonActions.DoAll();
    }
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