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For some reason the layouts don't seem to want to work inside a JTabbedPane. Instead of flowing onto the next "line", it just acts as if it had infinite horizontal space :( However adding everything directly to the frame without the JTabbedPane works fine...

In my frame:

JTabbedPane tabs = new JTabbedPane(JTabbedPane.TOP);
this.getContentPane().add(this.tabbedPane);
JPanel tab = new TestTab();
tabs.add("Test", tab)

And my TestTab constructor (extends JPanel)

contentBox = new Box(BoxLayout.Y_AXIS);

JPanel groupPanel = new JPanel();
groupPanel.setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEFT));
groupPanel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createTitledBorder("Group"));

//add some paired items to it. The intention is each of these "sub groups"
//should stay together,with the sub groups themselves being liad out left to
//right, top to bottom
for(int i=0; i<10; ++i)
{
    String label = "Button " + i;
    Box itemBox = new Box(BoxLayout.X_AXIS);
    JButton buttonA = new JButton(label + " A");
    JButton buttonB = new JButton(label + " B");
    itemBox.add(buttonA);
    itemBox.add(buttonB);
    groupPanel.add(itemBox);
}

contentBox.add(groupPanel);
//will be more content stuff to be added vertically below,
//suppose will have same issue
this.add(contentBox);
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2 Answers

This has nothing to do with tabbed panes as your problem will occur if you simply add your TestTab JPanel to the JFrame's contentPane. Perhaps you need to reign in the size of your contentBox Box by setting its preferredSize? Perhaps you want to use a GridLayout rather than a FlowLayout? Myself, I like using a GridLayout here like so:

  JPanel groupPanel = new JPanel();
  //!! groupPanel.setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEFT));
  groupPanel.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 2, 5, 5));

But also, when posting a problem like this, please try to post compilable runnable code so we can see the problem for ourselves. Don't make us have to create the code ourselves since you're the one asking for the free advice and thus should make an effort to help make it easy for others to help you. What I'm asking for is an SSCCE like this one:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class TestTabsTest {
   private static void createAndShowUI() {
      JTabbedPane tabs = new JTabbedPane(JTabbedPane.TOP);
      JPanel tab = new TestTab();
      tabs.add("Test", tab);

      JFrame frame = new JFrame("TestTabsTest");
      frame.getContentPane().add(tabs);
      //frame.getContentPane().add(new TestTab());
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowUI();
         }
      });
   }
}

class TestTab extends JPanel {
   private Box contentBox;

   public TestTab() {
      contentBox = new Box(BoxLayout.Y_AXIS);
      //contentBox.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(600, 600));

      JPanel groupPanel = new JPanel();
      //!! groupPanel.setLayout(new FlowLayout(FlowLayout.LEFT));
      groupPanel.setLayout(new GridLayout(0, 2, 5, 5));
      groupPanel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createTitledBorder("Group"));

      // add some paired items to it. The intention is each of these
      // "sub groups"
      // should stay together,with the sub groups themselves being liad out left
      // to
      // right, top to bottom
      for (int i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
         String label = "Button " + i;
         Box itemBox = new Box(BoxLayout.X_AXIS);
         JButton buttonA = new JButton(label + " A");
         JButton buttonB = new JButton(label + " B");
         itemBox.add(buttonA);
         itemBox.add(buttonB);
         groupPanel.add(itemBox);
      }

      contentBox.add(groupPanel);
      // will be more content stuff to be added vertically below,
      // suppose will have same issue
      this.add(contentBox);
   }
}
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ok, ill provide the full classes in future. The reason I'm not using a gridlayout in the first place is since for my (real poject) a window about 1500 wide can display everything nicly on one line, but no everyone has a screen that big, or wants it maximised... Also while setprefered size seems to work, it seems to totally ignore window resizes, and componentResized doesnt seem to get called until somtime after the reize has finished –  will May 21 '11 at 14:07
    
Also having just played with prefered sizes, is there no way to only set the prefered width, and let the layout deal with height rather than me having to try and guess what the height should be ? –  will May 21 '11 at 14:10
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Instead of flowing onto the next "line",

Sounds like the Wrap Layout might help.

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Nice. I've always wanted to fiddle with creating my own layout managers, and your source code and its comments will help a great deal, thanks! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 21 '11 at 16:45
    
@Hovercraft Full Of Eels, Pete, (you are Pete aren't you?), this layout manager is not the best example of a custom layout manager since it doesn't actually do any layout of the components. The FlowLayout still does all the layout. This class only recalculates the preferred size when it determines that components have actually wrapped. A better example of layout code would be the "Relative Layout" or "Overlap Layout" both found on my blog. These layout managers do the actual layout of the components as well as calculating the preferred size. Or look at the source code of the FlowLayout. –  camickr May 22 '11 at 1:56
    
Rob, yep, it's Pete, and thanks! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '11 at 2:34
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