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How can I make a public getter and a private setter for for a property? Is the following correct?

public String Password
{
    set { this._password = value; }
}

private String Password
{
    get { return this._password; }
}
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your text asks for public String Password {get; private set} but your code is for public String Password { set; private get;} one of those is obviously wrong. –  Yaur May 21 '11 at 15:37
    
@Yaur: Good catch, I didn't notice that. But either one will work using the same syntax. –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 16:36

5 Answers 5

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Yes it is possible, even with auto properties. I often use:

public int MyProperty { get; private set; }
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can you explain what this guy is saying about your answer? stackoverflow.com/questions/1073392/… is he saying that this is not alright to do? im confused –  Brandon Ling Mar 31 '13 at 21:46
1  
That question and Jon's answer says that there are cases where this is not okay, specifically if the value should be readonly (not possible to set after ctor has run) it is wrong to use an auto property. As with any language feature there are both correct and incorrect uses. –  Anders Abel Apr 1 '13 at 20:15
    
Thank you, I really appreciate your answer ! –  Brandon Ling Apr 1 '13 at 20:51

Yes, as of C# 2.0, you can specify different access levels for the getter and the setter of a property.

But you have the syntax wrong: you should declare them as part of the same property. Just mark the one you want to restrict with private. For example:

public String Password
{
    private get { return this._password; }
    set { this._password = value; }
}
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public String Password
{
    private set { this._password = value; }
    get { return this._password; }
}

or you can use an auto-implemented property:

public String Password { get; private set; }
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2  
this will make both public right? I want to make the getter method only available to class itself, mean private. –  BlueBird May 21 '11 at 15:03
    
The first bit of code is not correct. It doesn't do what is requested. The second bit does work. –  Cheeso May 21 '11 at 15:05
    
I fixed it. It is now correct. –  Jason Moore May 21 '11 at 15:06
    
I like to place the getter before the setter, as is customary with properties having identical access levels. –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 15:16
public String Password
{
    private set { this._password = value; }
    get { return this._password; }
}

MSDN:

The get and set methods are generally no different from other methods. They can perform any program logic, throw exceptions, be overridden, and be declared with any modifiers allowed by the programming language.

Edit: MSDN quote is just to clarify why geter and setter can have different access mdofiers, Good point raised by @Cody Gray:

Yes, properties can perform program logic and throw exceptions. But they shouldn't. Properties are intended to be very lightweight methods, comparable to accessing a field. The programmer should expect to be able to use them as they would a field without any noticeable performance implications. So too much heavy program logic is strongly discouraged. And while setters can throw exceptions if necessary, getters should almost never throw exceptions

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It is interesting, we can set for individual items right? –  BlueBird May 21 '11 at 15:07
    
Not really if you think about it - they are no different from other functions. –  YetAnotherUser May 21 '11 at 15:13
    
This code doesn't compile: you can't specify public twice. –  svick May 21 '11 at 15:13
1  
Yes, properties can perform program logic and throw exceptions. But they shouldn't. Properties are intended to be very lightweight methods, comparable to accessing a field. The programmer should expect to be able to use them as they would a field without any noticeable performance implications. So too much heavy program logic is strongly discouraged. And while setters can throw exceptions if necessary, getters should almost never throw exceptions. –  Cody Gray May 21 '11 at 15:14
    
+1 @Cody Gray - in general I agree, was just quoting what msdn says about it. –  YetAnotherUser May 21 '11 at 15:16

public string Password { get; private set; }

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