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OK, so I'm starting a new project using Rails 3.1 and I'm new to CoffeeScript.

Anyway, I like the idea of having asset files representing controllers but what if I only want the JS to render when the controller is called?

For example, I have a controller called Game. In my games.js.coffee file, I put some code in there and it's called for every page request. Even pages that have nothing to do with Games.

In Rails 3.0.7, what I would do is put a yield(:js) in the application erb file and then call content_for(:js) in my Games#action view. That way, only the js that was needed for that controller was loaded.

Or, am I going about this the wrong way? Is it better to have ALL js code loaded and cached for every page request to improve performance?

Thanks for any suggestions.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is it better to have ALL js code loaded and cached for every page request to improve performance?

Basically, the Rails team decided that the answer is usually "yes." Most sites work best with just a single (minified) JS file, which you get by default in Rails 3.1. That way, once the user has accessed a single page of your site, all other pages will load quickly, since all the JS has been cached.

If your site has a huge amount of JS (think Facebook), then I'd suggest architecting your site to load rarely-used JS code asynchronously, using a library like RequireJS. Otherwise, I wouldn't bother loading different code under different controllers; it's a lot of extra work for a marginal benefit.

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Take a look at this plugin, I think it solves your problem: https://github.com/snitko/specific_assets

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