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I want to run a very simple HTTP server. Every GET request to example.com should get index.html served to it but as a regular HTML page (i.e., same experience as when you read normal web pages).

Using the code below, I can read the content of index.html. How do I serve index.html as a regular web page?

var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');
var index = fs.readFileSync('index.html');

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
  res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
  res.end(index);
}).listen(9615);

One suggestion below is complicated and requires me to write a "get" line for each resource (css, js, images) file I want to use. Any working example allowing me to serve a single html page with some images, css and js would be greatly appreciated.

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7  
Have a look at the npm module "connect". It provides such basic functionality and is the basis of many setups and other packages. –  Mörre May 21 '11 at 20:53
2  
You should put your solution as an answer and mark it correct. –  graham.reeds Jun 2 '11 at 9:04
2  
I was able to find a perfect solution by Eric B. Sowell called Serving static files from node js. Read the whole thing. Highly recommended. –  idophir Jun 6 '11 at 6:38
    
Have a look at a module I wrote called Cachemere. It also automatically caches all your resources. github.com/topcloud/cachemere –  user1181615 Nov 25 '13 at 5:07
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9 Answers

You can use Connect with NodeJS for this:

  1. Install connect with NPM

    $ npm install connect
    
  2. Create server.js file with this content:

    var connect = require('connect');
    connect.createServer(
        connect.static(__dirname)
    ).listen(8080);
    
  3. Run with NodeJS

    $ node server.js
    

You can now go to http://localhost:8080/yourfile.html

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5  
The idea was to not use an existing library, for educational reasons, but I think using Express is a better advice than its lower level version, Connect. –  idophir Dec 8 '11 at 14:33
34  
The part of Express that serves static file is just Connect, so i don't see the reason to use Express for serving static files. But yes, also Express will do the job. –  Gian Marco Gherardi Dec 9 '11 at 8:57
1  
Excellent advice. The steps above worked for my purposes very well. Thanks to Gian, Here is the link to Express where it reveals it is built on Connect, expressjs.com Here is how to use Express: expressjs.com/guide.html –  ClintNash Jun 25 '12 at 3:04
    
Just found this as another alternative: github.com/cloudhead/node-static –  Gian Marco Gherardi Jul 21 '12 at 19:41
2  
Not working for me, result Cannot GET /test.html. Should I replace __dirname with a directory name? –  Timo Oct 26 '13 at 10:04
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Check out this gist. I'm reproducing it here for reference, but the gist has been regularly updated.

Node.JS static file web server. Put it in your path to fire up servers in any directory, takes an optional port argument.

var http = require("http"),
    url = require("url"),
    path = require("path"),
    fs = require("fs")
    port = process.argv[2] || 8888;

http.createServer(function(request, response) {

  var uri = url.parse(request.url).pathname
    , filename = path.join(process.cwd(), uri);

  path.exists(filename, function(exists) {
    if(!exists) {
      response.writeHead(404, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
      response.write("404 Not Found\n");
      response.end();
      return;
    }

    if (fs.statSync(filename).isDirectory()) filename += '/index.html';

    fs.readFile(filename, "binary", function(err, file) {
      if(err) {        
        response.writeHead(500, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
        response.write(err + "\n");
        response.end();
        return;
      }

      response.writeHead(200);
      response.write(file, "binary");
      response.end();
    });
  });
}).listen(parseInt(port, 10));

console.log("Static file server running at\n  => http://localhost:" + port + "/\nCTRL + C to shutdown");

Update

The gist does handle css and js files. I've used it myself. Using read/write in "binary" mode isn't a problem. That just means that the file isn't interpreted as text by the file library and is unrelated to content-type returned in the response.

The problem with your code is you're always returning a content-type of "text/plain". The above code does not return any content-type, but if you're just using it for HTML, CSS, and JS, a browser can infer those just fine. No content-type is better than a wrong one.

Normally the content-type is a configuration of your web server. So I'm sorry if this doesn't solve your problem, but it worked for me as a simple development server and thought it might help some other people. If you do need correct content-types in the response, you either need to explicitly define them as joeytwiddle has or use a library like Connect that has sensible defaults. The nice thing about this is that it's simple and self-contained (no dependencies).

But I do feel your issue. So here is the combined solution.

var http = require("http"),
    url = require("url"),
    path = require("path"),
    fs = require("fs")
    port = process.argv[2] || 8888;

http.createServer(function(request, response) {

  var uri = url.parse(request.url).pathname
    , filename = path.join(process.cwd(), uri);

  var contentTypesByExtension = {
    '.html': "text/html",
    '.css':  "text/css",
    '.js':   "text/javascript"
  };

  path.exists(filename, function(exists) {
    if(!exists) {
      response.writeHead(404, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
      response.write("404 Not Found\n");
      response.end();
      return;
    }

    if (fs.statSync(filename).isDirectory()) filename += '/index.html';

    fs.readFile(filename, "binary", function(err, file) {
      if(err) {        
        response.writeHead(500, {"Content-Type": "text/plain"});
        response.write(err + "\n");
        response.end();
        return;
      }

      var headers = {};
      var contentType = contentTypesByExtension[path.extname(filename)];
      if (contentType) headers["Content-Type"] = contentType;
      response.writeHead(200, headers);
      response.write(file, "binary");
      response.end();
    });
  });
}).listen(parseInt(port, 10));

console.log("Static file server running at\n  => http://localhost:" + port + "/\nCTRL + C to shutdown");
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't really solves the "problem". You return index.html as a binary file and you don't handle css and js. –  idophir Nov 30 '12 at 4:58
    
It does handle css and js. It does not return index.html as a binary file. It simply copies data off of disk in whatever format it's in. Please see updates for more explanation. –  Jonathan Tran Nov 30 '12 at 16:56
1  
Thanks Jonathan. I like your solution. –  idophir Dec 3 '12 at 19:08
    
Very nice. I really would have thought this type of thing would be in the node.js docs. –  Markku K. Oct 10 '13 at 23:22
    
one issue with the code, it's case-sensitive, on unix for certain files, it gives 404 –  pradeep Nov 15 '13 at 9:47
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I think the part you're missing right now is that you're sending:

Content-Type: text/plain

If you want a web browser to render the HTML, you should change this to:

Content-Type: text/html
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the quick reply. The page now loads but without the CSS. How can I get a standard html page with the CSS and JS loaded? –  idophir May 21 '11 at 21:22
6  
You need to start extending that server. Right now it only knows how to serve up index.html - you need to teach it how to serve foo.css and foo.js now, with their own appropriate MIME types. –  clee May 21 '11 at 22:06
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Step1 (inside command prompt [I hope you cd TO YOUR FOLDER]) : npm install express

Step 2: Create a file server.js

var fs = require("fs");
var host = "127.0.0.1";
var port = 1337;
var express = require("express");

var app = express();
app.use(app.router); //use both root and other routes below
app.use(express.static(__dirname + "/public")); //use static files in ROOT/public folder

app.get("/", function(request, response){ //root dir
    response.send("Hello!!");
});

app.listen(port, host);

Please note, you should add WATCHFILE too. Above code is only for a simple connection server.

STEP 3: node server.js

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exactly what I need, thx –  STEVER Aug 18 '13 at 7:51
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Rather than dealing with a switch statement, I think it's neater to lookup the content type from a dictionary:

var contentTypesByExtension = {
    'html': "text/html",
    'js':   "text/javascript"
};

...

    var contentType = contentTypesByExtension[fileExtension] || 'text/plain';
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, looks much more elegant than the "switch" solution used by Eric B. Sowell (see selected answer). Thanks. –  idophir Dec 8 '11 at 14:30
    
This sounds very promising :) –  Val Nov 20 '12 at 15:40
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var http = require('http');
var fs = require('fs');
var index = fs.readFileSync('index.html');

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'html'});
res.end(index);
}).listen(9615);

//Just Change The CONTENT TYPE to 'html'
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The Content-Type should be text/html, as it is defined that way: Content-Type := type "/" subtype *[";" parameter]. –  t.niese Mar 15 at 21:45
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Edit:

Node.js sample app Node Chat has the functionality you want.
In it's README.textfile
3. Step is what you are looking for.

step1

  • create a server that responds with hello world on port 8002

step2

  • create an index.html and serve it

step3

  • introduce util.js
  • change the logic so that any static file is served
  • show 404 in case no file is found

step4

  • add jquery-1.4.2.js
  • add client.js
  • change index.html to prompt user for nickname

Here is the server.js

Here is the util.js

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I don't care. I only have index.html. I just want to get the html+css+js loaded. Thanks! –  idophir May 21 '11 at 21:23
9  
-1 for .readFileSync in a callback. With node.js we use non blocking IO. Please do not recommend Sync commands. –  Raynos May 21 '11 at 22:22
2  
@Raynos thanks for the warning. Corected. –  Kerem Baydoğan May 21 '11 at 23:04
    
Hi @krmby, thanks for trying to help. I am really new at this. I downloaded both server.js and util.js. When I run "node server.js" and try to access the page using a browser, I get this error: TypeError: Object #<ServerResponse> has no method 'close' at /var/www/hppy-site/util.js:67:8 at /var/www/hppy-site/util.js:56:4 at [object Object].<anonymous> (fs.js:107:5) at [object Object].emit (events.js:61:17) at afterRead (fs.js:970:12) at wrapper (fs.js:245:17) Any ideas? BTW - same is happening when I download your project and run it. –  idophir May 22 '11 at 18:31
    
Sorry. I was using a new version. Replaced res.close() with res.end() –  idophir May 22 '11 at 19:05
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I use below code to start a simple web server which render default html file if no file mentioned in Url.

var http = require('http'),
fs = require('fs'),
url = require('url'),
rootFolder = '/views/',
defaultFileName = '/views/5 Tips on improving Programming Logic   Geek Files.htm';


http.createServer(function(req, res){

    var fileName = url.parse(req.url).pathname;
    // If no file name in Url, use default file name
    fileName = (fileName == "/") ? defaultFileName : rootFolder + fileName;

    fs.readFile(__dirname + decodeURIComponent(fileName), 'binary',function(err, content){
        if (content != null && content != '' ){
            res.writeHead(200,{'Content-Length':content.length});
            res.write(content);
        }
        res.end();
    });

}).listen(8800);

It will render all js, css and image file, along with all html content.

Agree on statement "No content-type is better than a wrong one"

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Simplest nodejs server is just ....

$ npm install http-server -g

Now you can run a server via

$ cd MyApp

$ http-server

OR

$ http-server -o --cors - which opens your web browser and enables CORS requests.

For more options, check out https://github.com/nodeapps/http-server OR run:

$ http-server --help

Lots of other nice features and brain dead simple deployment to NodeJitsu.

Of course you can easily top up the features with your own fork. You might be interested in this fork that can watch a directory and auto refresh the browser when files change:

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