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What HTML tags would you use in for this kind of information:


Name: John
Age: 40
City: Frankfurt
Country: Germany
Status: Active


I like to use the <label> tag within p tags here, which sounds like good semantics. However, this information is NOT inside a form. And the W3C says:

label: The label element represents a caption for a form control.

So what should I use then? I can clearly use <strong>, but this has no 'strong importance' and does not feel correct.

UPDATE

After noticing the DEFINITION LIST suggestion, I'd like to ask if this would still be best if I have several pieces of this information on the same page? It would mean I define "name" with a different "definition" several times. Eg:


Name: John
Age: 40
City: Frankfurt
Country: Germany
Status: Active


Name: Maria
Age: 30
City: Bonn
Country: Germany
Status: Inactive


Is <dl> still the best way to go?

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4  
Absolutely the DL is the way to go. Don't think of 'definition' in the strict sense, think of it as an instance definition. Even the w3c spec says 'Another application of DL, for example, is for marking up dialogues, with each DT naming a speaker, and each DD containing his or her words.', so they're very loose about it as well. –  John Green May 21 '11 at 22:21
1  
<dl> is still appropriate, it's not restricted to use for literal definitions. Even if it were strictly for definitions (say for a dictionary word's definition), it's normal to see multiple definitions for the same item. –  Wesley Murch May 21 '11 at 22:28
    
+1 for learning a new tag –  shevski May 21 '11 at 22:31
4  
As a matter of fact, I believe HTML5 is now calling it a "description list" dev.w3.org/html5/markup/dl.html –  Wesley Murch May 21 '11 at 22:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

A definition list could be suitable here:

<dl>
    <dt>Name</dt>
    <dd>John</dd>
    <dt>Age</dt>
    <dd>40</dd>
    <dt>City</dt>
    <dd>Frankfurt</dd>
    <dt>Country</dt>
    <dd>Germany</dd>
    <dt>Status</dt>
    <dd>Active</dd>
</dl>

http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/struct/lists.html#h-10.3 - Definition lists, created using the DL element, generally consist of a series of term/definition pairs (although definition lists may have other applications).

However, just because you want bold formatting doesn't mean you are restricted to <strong> or <b>. You can use the non-semantic <span> and simply apply the formatting with CSS.

In addition, you can use CSS to add the colons, rather than putting them in your markup:

dt:after { content:":"; }

Perhaps to help clear up some confusion about it's proper usage, it looks like HTML5 will be referring to this tag as a description list.

http://www.w3.org/TR/html5/grouping-content.html#the-dl-element - The dl element represents an association list consisting of zero or more name-value groups (a description list).

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2  
+1 because you type way faster than me... while providing significantly more information. : ) Only comment is that if it were me and I was being persnickety about semantics, I'd dump the ':' in favor of having it styled through a css dt:after selector with ':' as the content. –  John Green May 21 '11 at 22:12
    
Thanks for this quick response, but is this really a "definition list" as intended by the W3C? After all, I am not really "defining" the terms, I am just giving them a value, which can change from page to page (whereas a definition would be fixed, I'd guess). I updated my question. –  joh-3 May 21 '11 at 22:17
    
@plua: It's quite appropriate appropriate for name/value pairs. Look at some of the examples on the page I linked to. DL is also used for dialogs (as in a script). Also, do a google search for "html definition list semantics" and you will see it in use for a variety of applications. I agree it's a bit dubious, but I don't think there is another, more appropriate html tag for this. –  Wesley Murch May 21 '11 at 22:24
    
OK thanks, I'll go with the DL then! –  joh-3 May 21 '11 at 22:36
    
And here is a nice CSS formating for this definition list: the-art-of-web.com/css/format-dl/#.UnV1fxBBHrg –  qub1n Nov 2 '13 at 22:08

This is the right place for a DL structure:

<dl>
   <dt>Name</dt>
   <dd>John</dd>

   <dt>Age</dt>
   <dd>40</dd>

   <dt>City</dt>
   <dd>Frankfurt</dd>

   <dt>Country</dt>
   <dd>Germany</dd>

   <dt>Status</dt>
   <dd>Active</dd>
</dl>

Note that you'll need to add styling in order to make it look like that, but this is the right logical structure.

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I would argue for using the <dfn> tag.

It's short, semantic and can be easily styled.

The <dfn> element marks the term being defined; the definition of the term should be given by the surrounding <p>, <section> or definition list group (usually a <dt>, <dd> pair).

Source: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/HTML/Element/dfn

share|improve this answer
    
As far as I can tell (and from reading the spec) it seems that <dfn> is meant for defining terms as in a dictionary or glossary, or within the text of an article, where you're actually defining the meaning of the term. So using it to show the values of filed like "name", "age", etc. doesn't sound quite semantic to me...on the other hand, this would certainly be better than using <label> outside of a form, since <label> is clearly specified to be used only in forms. –  Matt Browne Jun 21 at 14:44
    
I'm ambivalent on this, however, because to be consistent, the argument that this usage of <dfn> isn't really "defining a term" would be an argument against using <dt> and <dd> tags as in the accepted answer, which I think is probably overly limiting the usefulness of those tags. And if the deviation from strict semantics isn't too much of a concern, I actually like the idea of using <dfn> the best for the intended style in the question, since you don't have to write as many CSS overrides as you would with a <dl>. –  Matt Browne Jun 21 at 14:50
    
I changed my mind; see my answer –  Matt Browne Jun 21 at 15:52

I agree with the other answers that a <dl> list is the most semantic option here. In the past I was never sure if this was a correct use of <dl> because all the official descriptions of the <dl> element I saw described it as a "definition list" to be used for actually defining terms as in a glossary (see my comments on @Cristian's answer). However, after looking at the latest editor's draft of the HTML 5 spec, I noticed that it has been renamed to "description list" rather than "definition list", and the example given is actually very similar to the example in the question here.

<dfn>, on the other hand, seems to be intended only for actually defining terms. Here are some relevant quotes from the above link:

The dt element itself, when used in a dl element, does not indicate that its contents are a term being defined, but this can be indicated using the dfn element.

...

The dfn element represents the defining instance of a term. The paragraph, description list group, or section that is the nearest ancestor of the dfn element must also contain the definition(s) for the term given by the dfn element.

So in conclusion I would second the recommendation for the use of the <dl> element, even though its default styling is different from the OP's example.

Here's a reusable CSS class for a <dl> in the style of the example:

/* Displays the list in "field: value" format */
.dl-inline {
  overflow: hidden;
  *zoom: 1; //for IE 7 and below
}
  .dl-inline dt, .dl-inline dd {float:left;}
  .dl-inline dd + dd {clear:both;}
  .dl-inline dt {
    margin: 0;
    float: left;
    clear: both;
    font-weight: bold;
  }
  .dl-inline dt::after {content: ':';}
  .dl-inline dd {margin-left: 1ex;}

Or the SASS/Compass version:

@import "compass/utilities/general/clearfix";

//Displays the list in "field: value" format
.dl-inline {
    @include clearfix;
    dt {
        margin:0;
        float:left;
        clear:both;
        font-weight:bold;
        &::after {content: ':'}
    }
    dd {
        float:left;
        margin-left: 1ex;
    }
    dd + dd {clear:both;}
}

HTML:

<dl class="dl-inline">
    <dt>Name</dt>
    <dd>John</dd>
    <dt>Age</dt>
    <dd>40</dd>
    ...
</dl>
share|improve this answer
    
Good spot.. I'm not sure about the CSS though. I think the HTML itself should have some basic layout, so that it is readable without CSS. –  Midas Jun 26 at 17:06
    
I think a <dl> is readable by itself, it just spans multiple lines rather than having the field value on the same line. –  Matt Browne Jun 26 at 22:17

Maybe you can use a definition list (dl, dt, dd), but that doesn't sound correct either.

As W3C says that it represents a caption for a form control, the text next to the label isn't a control, and so the for attribute becomes pointless.

I would just go with strong, also because it's the best representation without CSS.


Edit:

Since this about people, you can also use the vCard equivalent for HTML: hCard. Example:

<div class="vcard">
    <div class="fn">
        <strong class="type">Name</strong>:
        <span class="value">John</span>
    </div>
    <div class="note">
        <strong class="type">Age</strong>:
        <span class="value">40</span>
    </div>
    <div class="adr">
        <div class="locality">
            <strong class="type">City</strong>:
            <span class="value">Frankfurt</span>
        </div>
        <div class="country-name">
            <strong class="type">Country</strong>:
            <span class="value">Germany</span>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="note">
        <strong class="type">Status</strong>:
        <span class="value">Active</span>
    </div>
</div>

You can then use as many of these in an <ul> or <ol>. Some browsers will recognize these properties and turn them into links for use with an application. For example the adr properties could link to a mapping tool.

This is just a standard, it's not meant to be semantically correct. As far as I know you can use whatever markup (HTML tags) you like within these hCards. See link for the details.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems that W3C has changed <dl> from being only "definition lists" to being any kind of "description list", so a <dl> would indeed be correct, at least according to the latest spec. See my answer –  Matt Browne Jun 21 at 15:53

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