Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have tried with both if-elif-else and case easc. I don't know why it doesn't accept the condition when it should be true.

cat temp | (while read line
do
heading=${line%% *}
echo "'$heading'"

case $heading in
'Cell')
echo 'hit cell'
echo $line | awk "{printf '%-20s %15s', $5, `./get.sh $5`}";;
'Frequency')
echo 'hit frequency'
echo $line | awk "{gsub('\)', '', $5);printf '%6s', $5 }";;
'blah')
echo 'hit blah'
echo $line | awk "{gsub('\"', '', $0);printf '%40s', $1 }";;
*) echo 'fail';;
esac

done)

I don't understand why it doesn't pass the case test (or if-elif version of this). From the echo heading line i get exactly what I expect: 'Cell' 'Frequency' 'blah'

These happen in a cycle and there are no spaces which could cause the test to fail.

But it still prints fail fail fail fail.

Does anyone have any idea what could cause this weird behavior? I have checked values up and down and can't find any reason. Help would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Are all the calls to awk extraneous to the problem? What does your input file look like? –  sarnold May 21 '11 at 23:02
    
They should be I tested them individually already. It won't jump into the case statement. The input file is a mac-vendor delimited list. –  aitee May 21 '11 at 23:06
1  
perhaps my initial question should have included a hint: if we can run a script and input file that reproduces the problem, it's far easier to help solve the problem. :) –  sarnold May 21 '11 at 23:08
    
I think I just solved my own problem--Because the input is coming from standard in, it has "colors" involved in the shell. Its actually comparing in the case from the regular word to the colored one.. I believe that is the problem--though I have no idea how I can "strip" the color characters off. I read somewhere that color is achieved in the shell by some character sequence like ]e45 I can't remember. –  aitee May 21 '11 at 23:24
    
There should be an option to have plain output. Are you saving the output from ls into the file temp? There are answers here on S.O. about escape sequences for coloring ls output and how to remove them programatically, but if you can turn it off at the source, that is much cleaner. (Do you have a function or alias for ls` that might be overriding a plain output version? Also see my comment Femi's answer. Good Luck. –  shellter May 22 '11 at 19:26

1 Answer 1

Syntax error: you don't need the single quotes:

cat temp | (while read line
do
heading=${line%% *}
echo "'$heading'"

case $heading in
Cell)
echo 'hit cell'
echo $line | awk "{printf '%-20s %15s', $5, `./get.sh $5`}";;
Frequency)
echo 'hit frequency'
echo $line | awk "{gsub('\)', '', $5);printf '%6s', $5 }";;
blah)
echo 'hit blah'
echo $line | awk "{gsub('\"', '', $0);printf '%40s', $1 }";;
*) echo 'fail';;
esac

done)
share|improve this answer
    
roight, case matches the string literally. The input would have to hae the single quote to match. –  Keith May 22 '11 at 0:04
    
What about double quotes? (i've seen examples elsewhere online with double quotes) It is working with them (single quotes) actually. I do believe it was the color codes that egrep had added in. (I guess for the quotes thing it must depend on the shell interpreter you have?) –  aitee May 22 '11 at 0:19
    
I agree with @aitee ; At least on my bash, this is not correct. Try this test : echo test | while read line ; do case ${line} in 'test' ) echo match test1 ;; test ) echo match test2 ;; esac ; done. I got this output : match test1. The single-quotes are stripped before evaluating the case targets. –  shellter May 22 '11 at 19:21
    
Well, there are shell specifics to deal with: I tested with #!/bin/bash, but if you're running this at a shell on Ubuntu you might have dash or some other abomination actually executing, and the handling might be different. But the original code didn't work for me in the Bash on a Debian lenny box. –  Femi May 22 '11 at 19:26
    
Good to know. My experience, primarily with ksh, was that quotes are not part of the evaluted string for case targets except that you need them to protect white-space chars that are part of the case target. I did a quick test with the bash I had to confirm my answer. Now I know it is not a 100% certain thing. Thanks for sharing! –  shellter May 23 '11 at 3:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.