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I've been writing an image processing algorithm now, and at some point I needed to collect some statistical information about the transformed pixels to gain some more insight about the direction I should follow with further development. The sort of information that I needed to collect was in the format:

key: RGB value
value: int

What I did, was I opened the transformed image and iterated through it, saving the values I needed to std::unordered_map that has the following signature:

typedef std::unordered_map<boost::gil::rgb8_pixel_t, unsigned int> pixel_map_t;

In a loop:

for(int y = 0; y < vi.height(); y++) {
    SrcView::x_iterator dst_it = src.row_begin(y);
    for(int x = 0; x < vi.width(); x++, hits++) {
        diff_map.insert(std::make_pair(dst_it[x], /* some uint32 */));
    } 

I also write a custom hash function (it was a perfect hash function: 256^2 x R + 256 x G + B - so the collisions should be minimal regardless of the buckets and hashtable's layout (to a reasonable extend).

What I noticed, was that the insertion was miserably slow! - after reaching the 11'th iteration, insertion speed degraded by about 100x. I had a massive amount of collisions! Despite the very small number of duplicated colors in the image.

Afterwards, I wanted to eliminate any possible fault within my code, and started benchmarking the unordered_map using the STL hash functions with primitive key types such as int.

The code for the benchmark was:

std::size_t hits = 0, colls = 0;
for(int y = 0; y < vi.height(); y++) {
    SrcView::x_iterator dst_it = src.row_begin(y);

    for(int x = 0; x < vi.width(); x++, hits++) {
        if(diff_map.find(x*y) != diff_map.cend())
            colls++;
        diff_map.insert(std::make_pair(x*y, 10));
    } 
    std::cout << y << "/" << vi.height() << " -> buckets: " 
              << diff_map.bucket_count() << "(" 
              << std::floor(diff_map.load_factor() * 100) 
              << "% load factor) [ " << colls << " collisions / " <<  hits << " hits ]"  << std::endl;
}

... and here are the results for the first 20 iterations of the outer loop (using only STL's hash function for int-typed key):

0/480 -> buckets: 8(12% load factor) [ 639 collisions / 640 hits ]
1/480 -> buckets: 4096(15% load factor) [ 640 collisions / 1280 hits ]
2/480 -> buckets: 4096(23% load factor) [ 960 collisions / 1920 hits ]
3/480 -> buckets: 4096(31% load factor) [ 1281 collisions / 2560 hits ]
4/480 -> buckets: 4096(37% load factor) [ 1654 collisions / 3200 hits ]
5/480 -> buckets: 4096(45% load factor) [ 1964 collisions / 3840 hits ]
6/480 -> buckets: 4096(51% load factor) [ 2370 collisions / 4480 hits ]
7/480 -> buckets: 4096(59% load factor) [ 2674 collisions / 5120 hits ]
8/480 -> buckets: 4096(65% load factor) [ 3083 collisions / 5760 hits ]
9/480 -> buckets: 4096(71% load factor) [ 3460 collisions / 6400 hits ]
10/480 -> buckets: 4096(77% load factor) [ 3872 collisions / 7040 hits ]
11/480 -> buckets: 4096(85% load factor) [ 4161 collisions / 7680 hits ]
12/480 -> buckets: 4096(90% load factor) [ 4612 collisions / 8320 hits ]
13/480 -> buckets: 4096(99% load factor) [ 4901 collisions / 8960 hits ]
14/480 -> buckets: 32768(13% load factor) [ 5315 collisions / 9600 hits ]
15/480 -> buckets: 32768(13% load factor) [ 5719 collisions / 10240 hits ]
16/480 -> buckets: 32768(14% load factor) [ 6148 collisions / 10880 hits ]
17/480 -> buckets: 32768(15% load factor) [ 6420 collisions / 11520 hits ]
18/480 -> buckets: 32768(16% load factor) [ 6870 collisions / 12160 hits ]
19/480 -> buckets: 32768(17% load factor) [ 7135 collisions / 12800 hits ]
20/480 -> buckets: 32768(17% load factor) [ 7584 collisions / 13440 hits ]
21/480 -> buckets: 32768(18% load factor) [ 7993 collisions / 14080 hits ]

Isn't the number of collisions too high in this case? STL libraries in general are of high quality, but having 639/640 and 640/1280 for simple int-based key sound at least weird. Or maybe I'm doing something wrong?


And this was my hash function (in theory, should have no collisions at all - but the numbers were very close):

template<> 
struct std::hash<boost::gil::rgb8_pixel_t> :
    public std::unary_function<const boost::gil::rgb8_pixel_t&, size_t>
{
    size_t operator()(const boost::gil::rgb8_pixel_t& key) const
    {
        size_t ret =  (static_cast<size_t>(key[0]) << 16) |
                      (static_cast<size_t>(key[1]) << 8) |
                      (static_cast<size_t>(key[2]));
        //return 256 * 256 * key[0] + 256 * key[1] + key[2];
        return ret;
    }
};

Now, this is not funny anymore...

I wrote this hash function:

template<> 
struct std::hash<int> :
    public std::unary_function<const int&, size_t>
{
    size_t operator()(const int& key) const
    {
        return 5;
    }
};

In theory, I should have 100% rate of collisions, right? but the results are:

0/480 -> buckets: 8(12% load factor) [ 639 collisions / 640 hits ]
1/480 -> buckets: 4096(15% load factor) [ 640 collisions / 1280 hits ]
2/480 -> buckets: 4096(23% load factor) [ 960 collisions / 1920 hits ]
3/480 -> buckets: 4096(31% load factor) [ 1281 collisions / 2560 hits ]
4/480 -> buckets: 4096(37% load factor) [ 1654 collisions / 3200 hits ]
5/480 -> buckets: 4096(45% load factor) [ 1964 collisions / 3840 hits ]
6/480 -> buckets: 4096(51% load factor) [ 2370 collisions / 4480 hits ]
7/480 -> buckets: 4096(59% load factor) [ 2674 collisions / 5120 hits ]
8/480 -> buckets: 4096(65% load factor) [ 3083 collisions / 5760 hits ]
9/480 -> buckets: 4096(71% load factor) [ 3460 collisions / 6400 hits ]

Why?

Env: MSVS2010

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2  
Your benchmark is flawed. For y==0 you insert 640 times std::make_pair(x*y, 10), which is make_pair(0,10). 639 collision are expected. Didn't look any further, assuming the remainader of your code is equally buggy –  hirschhornsalz May 22 '11 at 0:22
4  
The hashmap that you have provided is far away from a perfect hash function, unless you have a 2^24 bucket hash table. For any table that is a power of two (which seems to be the case), what you are doing is ignoring the red component and part of the green. If you have an image that contains all shades of red, all of the pixels will collide for example... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 22 '11 at 1:05
    
(((r+2)^37) % 4294967291) ^ (((g+2)^37) % 4294967291) ^ (((b+2)^37) % 4294967291) would be slow, but result in excellent mixing. :-) –  Omnifarious May 22 '11 at 5:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

colls is not measuring collisions. If you want to measure collisions, then for each bucket b in the range [0, bucket_count()), get bucket_size(b). That will tell you how many items are in each bucket. If there are 2 or more items in the bucket, then you have bucket_size(b) - 1 collisions for bucket b.

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Thank you! now the results are more realistic - until the 52nd iteration i barely had any collisions, –  Karim Agha May 22 '11 at 1:35

Your hash space is 24bits in size. To have 0 collisions, you'd need a hash table the size of your data if your has is perfect, larger by 25-50% if not. My guess is you've made your hash table much, much smaller than this, hence the container is remapping over your data and causing the collisions.

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If I understand what you're doing correctly, you are possibly just getting these collisions because many pixels in your image have the same color and you are repeatedly calling diff_map.insert for the same color (so the quality of your hash value is irrelevant). If you're doing this to compute the histogram of colors, you probably don't want to do "diff_map.insert(std::make_pair(dst_it[x], /* some uint32 */));", but rather just do something like

auto it = diff_map.find(dst_it[x]); if(it == diff_map.end()) it = 1; else (it->second)++;

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There aren't many duplicated color in the image (it's 3d semi-gradient). How would then diff_map.insert(x*y, 5) explain the collisions? –  Karim Agha May 22 '11 at 0:22

I also write a custom hash function (it was a perfect hash function: 256^2 x R + 256 x G + B - so the collisions should be minimal regardless of the buckets and hashtable's layout (to a reasonable extend).

This hash function isn't good. A good hash function (when you don't know the number of buckets) should generate hugely different hash values for nearly-identical inputs. In your case, a very simple way to achieve this is to use three tables of 256 random 32-bit values: int32_t rand[3][256] - then hash ala rand[0][R] ^ rand[1][G] ^ rand[2][B]. This scatters your values randomly across the buckets with no tendencies to cluster for similar values: the ideal hashing function property for unknown # buckets.

You could also let the library-provided hash functions have a crack at it, they can't possibly improve on the random table properties for hash generation, but may be faster due to less memory lookups or slower due to more or more complex maths operations - benchmark if you care.

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Even though you may not have equal values, the values might be close enough. I have had a tough time trying to find good hashing functions for time series or numbers that are not scattered. When the unordered_map does a '%' (modulo) on the hash value with the number of buckets, most of your values might end up in few buckets only (if hash values are not well scattered) and that leads to O(n) searches.

When the hash values are not scattered enough, I would just use std::map (RB tree) where I get O(log n).

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