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Can we use enum inside a switch?

public enum Color {
  RED,BLUE,YELLOW


}


 public class Use {
  Color c = Color.BLUE;

  public void test(){
      switch(c){
      case Color.BLUE:

      }
  }
}

I am getting some error in this.

The enum constant Color.BLUE reference cannot be qualified in a case label  Use.java        line 7  Java Problem
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3  
What errors are you getting? –  Shawn May 22 '11 at 4:39
2  
Can you post the actual code you're trying to compile (cut 'n paste)? –  Bob Kaufman May 22 '11 at 4:42
    
@all: pasted the actual code, can you please suggest now? –  ako May 22 '11 at 4:51
    
As an aside, you may not want to give your enum the same name as the java.awt.Color class as it may make for confusing code. I'd give use "Color" in the name but would add a suffix or a prefix. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '11 at 5:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted
case COLOR.BLUE:

    }

In the above code instead of COLOR.BLUE only write BLUE


E.G.

import java.awt.Color;

class ColorEnum {

    enum Color{BLUE,RED,YELLOW};

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Color c = Color.BLUE;
        switch(c) {
            case BLUE:
                System.out.println("Blue!");
                break;
            case RED:
                System.out.println("Red!");
                break;
            case YELLOW:
                System.out.println("Yellow!");
                break;
            default:
                System.out.println("Logic error!");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
dint get u –  ako May 22 '11 at 4:49
    
@ako: See the edit. @Ankit: I thought it was better to post my little e.g. on your answer (since it was based on your answer) - hope you don't mind. –  Andrew Thompson May 22 '11 at 4:57
    
@Andrew : Thanx –  Ankit May 22 '11 at 5:00

Write it like this:

public void test(){
  switch(c) {
  case BLUE:

  }
}

The enum label MUST NOT be qualified when used as a case label. The grammar at JLS 14.11 says this:

SwitchLabel:
    case ConstantExpression :
    case EnumConstantName :
    default :

EnumConstantName:
    Identifier

Note that a simple identifier is require, not an identifier qualified by the enum name.

(I don't know why they designed the syntax like that. Possibility it was to avoid some ambiguity in the grammar. But either way, that's the way it is.)

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Why use a switch at all? Rather just let the enum hold the Color information itself (encapsulate it) and thereby do all the dirty work. The advantage to this, is if you change your enum, you don't have to root through all code that uses it, changing all switch statements. For instance:

import java.awt.Color;

public enum MyColor {
   RED("Red", Color.red), BLUE("Blue", Color.blue), 
   YELLOW("Yellow", Color.yellow);

   private String text;
   private Color color;
   private MyColor(String text,Color color) {
      this.text = text;
      this.color = color;
   }

   public String getText() {
      return text;
   }

   public Color getColor() {
      return color;
   }

   @Override
   public String toString() {
      return text;
   }
}

and an example of how this can be used is as follows:

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

@SuppressWarnings("serial")
class MyColorTest extends JPanel {
   private static final Dimension PREF_SIZE = new Dimension(400, 300);

   public MyColorTest() {
      for (final MyColor myColor : MyColor.values()) {
         add(new JButton(new AbstractAction(myColor.getText()) {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent arg0) {
               MyColorTest.this.setBackground(myColor.getColor());
            }
         }));

      }
   }

   @Override
   public Dimension getPreferredSize() {
      return PREF_SIZE;
   }

   private static void createAndShowUI() {
      JFrame frame = new JFrame("MyColorTest");
      frame.getContentPane().add(new MyColorTest());
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
         public void run() {
            createAndShowUI();
         }
      });
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
What are you talking about? The original question has a custom enum called Color and nothing to do with awt.Color or converting from one enum to another. –  verdesmarald May 22 '11 at 5:09
1  
@veredesmarald: the original question was about using enums to encapsulate the idea of color, and the Switch was how the OP was trying to use the enum to generate the corresponding java.awt.Color (if you check his post you'll see this). Sometimes the best answer is not the one the OP is directly looking for, and I think that this is one of them, but I accept your difference of opinion and your down-vote. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '11 at 5:15
1  
@veredesmarald: The idea I'm trying to promulgate here is to encapsulate the related information together in one class or enum thus making the code less bug prone and easier to debug. An alternative is to have the switch statement as a static method that's part of the enum, but why when each enum member can more simply hold the info? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '11 at 5:27
1  
@Hovercraft: I just looked at the original question and I still don't see anything related to awt. I assumed that the Color enum mentioned was just a contrived example for the purposes of asking "How do I switch over an enum?". There are many situations where switching over an enum is useful and correct, and I don't think it is constructive to try and second-guess the OP and provide a whole bunch of not-really-related info after assuming what he is trying to do from the tiny snippet above. –  verdesmarald May 22 '11 at 5:35
    
@veredesmarald: Your argument has merit (1+ for the comment), and I accept it and agree -- my answer is not appropriate for the general question of how to use a switch with enums. But I will hold off deleting my answer pending clarification from the OP. If his statements verify your concerns, then I will gladly delete this answer. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels May 22 '11 at 5:39

Yes, you can use enums in switch statements, but make sure not to use FQCN (fully-Qualified Class Name) in case labels.


Following is extracted from "enum constant reference cannot be qualified in a case label of switch statement"

In Short

When a Java switch statement uses an enum parameter; qualified names of the enum values should not be used in case labels, but only the unqualified names; then switch statement will consider all the labels are referring to the enum type that is used as the parameter.

Why only unqualified values?

If qualified references were allowed for case labels; there would be no means to restrict the enum type used in the labels to be same as the parameter type of switch statement.

public enum Status {
    REGISTERED,
    TERMINATED
}

public class TestStatus {
    public static String getMessage(Status status) {
        String message;
        switch (status) {
            // case Status.REGISTERED: // line 1
            case REGISTERED: // line 2
                message = "Welcome";
                break;
            default:
                message = "Good bye";
                break;
        }
    return message;
}
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