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Is it a good practice to make the constructor throw an exception? For example I have a class Person and I have age as its only attribute. Now I provide the class as

class Person{
  int age;
  Person(int age) throws Exception{
   if (age<0)
       throw new Exception("invalid age");
   this.age = age;
  }

  public void setAge(int age) throws Exception{
  if (age<0)
       throw new Exception("invalid age");
   this.age = age;
  }
}
share|improve this question
9  
Looks fine to me, but your duplication of code is bad practice. Just call setAge from your constructor to reduce a lot of duplicate code – Codemwnci May 22 '11 at 6:06
9  
Might be a good idea to throw IllegalArgumentException in this case, makes it very explicit. – Mat May 22 '11 at 6:10
5  
@Codemwnci: Not really a good idea if setAge is virtual (as is the case here). – Mehrdad May 22 '11 at 6:13
    
@Mehrdad can you explain? why virtual method should not call inside Constructors? – UnKnown Mar 22 at 1:53
    
@UnKnown: It is explained here. – Mehrdad Mar 22 at 2:12

Throwing exceptions in a constructor is not bad practice. In fact, it is the only reasonable way for a constructor to indicate that there is a problem; e.g. that the parameters are invalid.

However explicitly declaring or throwing java.lang.Exception is almost always bad practice.

You should pick an exception class that matches the exceptional condition that has occurred. If you throw Exception it is difficult for the caller to separate this exception from any number of other possible declared and undeclared exceptions. This makes error recovery difficult, and if the caller chooses to propagate the Exception, the problem just spreads.


Someone suggested using assert for checking arguments. The problem with this is that checking of assert assertions can be turned on and off via a JVM command-line setting. Using assertions to check internal invariants is OK, but using them to implement argument checking that is specified in your javadoc is not a good idea ... because it means your method will only strictly implement the specification when assertion checking is enabled.

The second problem with assert is that if an assertion fails, then AssertionError will be thrown, and received wisdom is that it is a bad idea to attempt to catch Error and any of its subtypes.

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1  
Also throw only checked exception only when u want to provide a recoverable condition to the caller, else he has an obligation of either throw or catch it. If there is no recoverable condition its good practice to throw an unchecked exception – Punith Raj Jan 26 '14 at 16:18
1  
@PunithRaj - that is an orthogonal issue. Besides, your advice is over simplistic. – Stephen C Jan 27 '14 at 1:10
    
Your class cannot be constructed due to validation problems. Why are you validating in a constructor? Use a static initializer method instead, run the validation in it before constructing and returning, the object so you don't have the chance to have a security hole. – MLProgrammer-CiM May 14 '15 at 22:34
    
Fortunately, most Java code doesn't have security implications because it is not used in a context where suspect code can be injected. (And I would claim that it is not "best practice" to engineer all code for security critical usage ... just in case. Just like it is not "best practice" to make all classes thread-safe.) – Stephen C Jan 11 at 7:51

I've always considered throwing checked exceptions in the constructor to be bad practice, or at least something that should be avoided.

The reason for this is that you cannot do this :

private SomeObject foo = new SomeObject();

Instead you must do this :

private SomeObject foo;
public MyObject() {
    try {
        foo = new SomeObject()
    } Catch(PointlessCheckedException e) {
       throw new RuntimeException("ahhg",e);
    }
}

At the point when I'm constructing SomeObject I know what it's parameters are so why should I be expected to wrap it in a try catch? Ahh you say but if I'm constructing an object from dynamic parameters I don't know if they're valid or not. Well, you could... validate the parameters before passing them to the constructor. That would be good practice. And if all you're concerned about is whether the parameters are valid then you can use IllegalArgumentException.

So instead of throwing checked exceptions just do

public SomeObject(final String param) {
    if (param==null) throw new NullPointerException("please stop");
    if (param.length()==0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("no really, please stop");
}

Of course there are cases where it might just be reasonable to throw a checked exception

public SomeObject() {
    if (todayIsWednesday) throw new YouKnowYouCannotDoThisOnAWednesday();
}

But how often is that likely?

share|improve this answer
    
You are not always the producer and consumer of a class. That is, someone else may be using your class without checking. You can easily argue that they've failed to meet your preconditions for using the class and GIGO but the OP asked about the practice being good or bad. I'd argue that making your class easier to use and more reliable is good practice and being liberal in what you accept as inputs helps achieve that. – Stephen Jul 22 '15 at 15:40
1  
I think this comes down to the greater debate about checked and unchecked exceptions. Checked exceptions are often mis-used as a kind of response rather than an indication of exceptional circumstances. Few things are more exceptional than an error in the constructor. I think throwing a runtime exception if absolutely necessary is better than trying to indicate to the user that some forseen event occured. If it can be forseen, it's not exceptional is it? Generally I find you can use either IllegalStateException, NullPointerException or IllegalArgumentException. – Richard Jul 24 '15 at 12:02
    
I was under the impression the OP was asking about exceptions generally. I agree with your point that most cases are handled by the 3 specific exceptions you refer to. – Stephen Jul 26 '15 at 20:06
    
I think his example shows checked exceptions, certainly my answer was regarding checked exceptions. – Richard Jul 27 '15 at 14:53

You do not need to throw a checked exception. This is a bug within the control of the program, so you want to throw an unchecked exception. Use one of the unchecked exceptions already provided by the Java language, such as IllegalArgumentException, IllegalStateException or NullPointerException.

You may also want to get rid of the setter. You've already provided a way to initiate age through the constructor. Does it need to be updated once instantiated? If not, skip the setter. A good rule, do not make things more public than necessary. Start with private or default, and secure your data with final. Now everyone knows that Person has been constructed properly, and is immutable. It can be used with confidence.

Most likely this is what you really need:

class Person { 

  private final int age;   

  Person(int age) {    

    if (age < 0) 
       throw new IllegalArgumentException("age less than zero: " + age); 

    this.age = age;   
  }

  // setter removed
share|improve this answer

In my opinion it's a good practice: conceptually its another layer of protection to prevent poorly formed objects.

Further other languages such as C#/.Net 4.0 have explicitly added functionality: Code Contracts to do just this -- check input parameters and throw exceptions/warnings when the parameters are outside of any requirements. Update: Per the comments, Java also has a built in tool to handle code contracts: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Java_Modeling_Language

It's always good to check your parameters to make sure they are well defined -- why wouldn't you want to do that with a constructor too?

share|improve this answer
    
Code contracts are available for Java using the Java Modelling Language and associated tools. – Robin Green May 22 '11 at 6:56

It is bad practice to throw Exception, as that requires anyone who calls your constructor to catch Exception which is a bad practice.

It is a good idea to have a constructor (or any method) throw an exception, generally speaking IllegalArgumentException, which is unchecked, and thus the compiler doesn't force you to catch it.

You should throw checked exceptions (things that extend from Exception, but not RuntimeException) if you want the caller to catch it.

share|improve this answer
    
This idea that the compiler "forces you to catch things" is misleading. Often you can just declare your method to throw the same exception - right back up to the main method - which means you aren't forced to catch things. The only case in which you are literally forced by the compiler to catch things is when you are overriding a method that doesn't declare that exception, or a superclass of it, in a throws clause. – Robin Green May 22 '11 at 6:50
    
Sorry, should have written "forced to deal with" which means catch or add a throws clause. – TofuBeer May 22 '11 at 16:33

I have never considered it to be a bad practice to throw an exception in the constructor. When the class is designed, you have a certain idea in mind of what the structure for that class should be. If someone else has a different idea and tries to execute that idea, then you should error accordingly, giving the user feedback on what the error is. In your case, you might consider something like

if (age < 0) throw new NegativeAgeException("The person you attempted " +
                       "to construct must be given a positive age.");

where NegativeAgeException is an exception class that you constructed yourself, possibly extending another exception like IndexOutOfBoundsException or something similar.

Assertions don't exactly seem to be the way to go, either, since you're not trying to discover bugs in your code. I would say terminating with an exception is absolutely the right thing to do here.

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This is totally valid, I do it all the time. I usually use IllegalArguemntException in this case.

In this case I wouldn't suggest asserts because they are turned off in a deployment build and you always want to stop this from happening.

Also, an assert would be more difficult for the caller to trap, this is easy.

List it as a "throws" in your method's javadocs.

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As mentioned in another answer here, in Guideline 7-3 of the Java Secure Coding Guidelines, throwing an exception in the constructor of a non-final class opens a potential attack vector:

Guideline 7-3 / OBJECT-3: Defend against partially initialized instances of non-final classes When a constructor in a non-final class throws an exception, attackers can attempt to gain access to partially initialized instances of that class. Ensure that a non-final class remains totally unusable until its constructor completes successfully.

From JDK 6 on, construction of a subclassable class can be prevented by throwing an exception before the Object constructor completes. To do this, perform the checks in an expression that is evaluated in a call to this() or super().

    // non-final java.lang.ClassLoader
    public abstract class ClassLoader {
        protected ClassLoader() {
            this(securityManagerCheck());
        }
        private ClassLoader(Void ignored) {
            // ... continue initialization ...
        }
        private static Void securityManagerCheck() {
            SecurityManager security = System.getSecurityManager();
            if (security != null) {
                security.checkCreateClassLoader();
            }
            return null;
        }
    }

For compatibility with older releases, a potential solution involves the use of an initialized flag. Set the flag as the last operation in a constructor before returning successfully. All methods providing a gateway to sensitive operations must first consult the flag before proceeding:

    public abstract class ClassLoader {

        private volatile boolean initialized;

        protected ClassLoader() {
            // permission needed to create ClassLoader
            securityManagerCheck();
            init();

            // Last action of constructor.
            this.initialized = true;
        }
        protected final Class defineClass(...) {
            checkInitialized();

            // regular logic follows
            ...
        }

        private void checkInitialized() {
            if (!initialized) {
                throw new SecurityException(
                    "NonFinal not initialized"
                );
            }
        }
    }

Furthermore, any security-sensitive uses of such classes should check the state of the initialization flag. In the case of ClassLoader construction, it should check that its parent class loader is initialized.

Partially initialized instances of a non-final class can be accessed via a finalizer attack. The attacker overrides the protected finalize method in a subclass and attempts to create a new instance of that subclass. This attempt fails (in the above example, the SecurityManager check in ClassLoader's constructor throws a security exception), but the attacker simply ignores any exception and waits for the virtual machine to perform finalization on the partially initialized object. When that occurs the malicious finalize method implementation is invoked, giving the attacker access to this, a reference to the object being finalized. Although the object is only partially initialized, the attacker can still invoke methods on it, thereby circumventing the SecurityManager check. While the initialized flag does not prevent access to the partially initialized object, it does prevent methods on that object from doing anything useful for the attacker.

Use of an initialized flag, while secure, can be cumbersome. Simply ensuring that all fields in a public non-final class contain a safe value (such as null) until object initialization completes successfully can represent a reasonable alternative in classes that are not security-sensitive.

A more robust, but also more verbose, approach is to use a "pointer to implementation" (or "pimpl"). The core of the class is moved into a non-public class with the interface class forwarding method calls. Any attempts to use the class before it is fully initialized will result in a NullPointerException. This approach is also good for dealing with clone and deserialization attacks.

    public abstract class ClassLoader {

        private final ClassLoaderImpl impl;

        protected ClassLoader() {
            this.impl = new ClassLoaderImpl();
        }
        protected final Class defineClass(...) {
            return impl.defineClass(...);
        }
    }

    /* pp */ class ClassLoaderImpl {
        /* pp */ ClassLoaderImpl() {
            // permission needed to create ClassLoader
            securityManagerCheck();
            init();
        }

        /* pp */ Class defineClass(...) {
            // regular logic follows
            ...
        }
    }
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I wonder if anyone else realized the importance of this subtle point. This is something to be aware of when deciding to throw an exception from a constructor. – Ajoy Bhatia Mar 4 '15 at 23:26

I would not throw an exception from the constructor, mainly because when I am creating objects I want them to only hold the data. When you throw an exception from the constructor you are allowing a data object to control the logical flow of the application. Using the builder pattern you can create the Person object while keeping all the rules/conditions in a single class.

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1  
I don't understand the logic of this. Exceptions are typically thrown in constructors to report problems in the parameters, or in getting the object into its initial state. To avoid this, you need this, you need to restructure the code so that that work is not done in the constructor. That's fine if your API is designed to use the builder pattern exclusively, but otherwise it is problematic. – Stephen C May 25 '11 at 22:59
    
The only concerns of the constructor is that its method contract is fulfilled. The constructor doesn't care about the integer parameter value. When I create an object I expect that object to be created not throw run time exceptions. I should not have to worry about a special exception every where the object is created, therefore I'll make a builder that will handle those exceptions in one place. – Brian K Blain May 26 '11 at 14:09
    
"The only concerns of the constructor is that its method contract is fulfilled." - That is true. However, the contract should explicitly or implicitly include that the constructor arguments are appropriately valid and/or meaningful. (Conversely, if you are trying to say that a constructor contract should not address these things, then you need to provide some justification for that ... extreme ... view.) – Stephen C Jun 26 '14 at 1:14
    
The other way to look at your answer is that your "... because [...] I want [the objects] to only hold the data." is strange. In normal OO designs, typical classes will have non-trivial instance methods that depend on the validity of the instance variables. If your code isn't like that, either it is very unusual or you are not doing OO properly. – Stephen C Jun 26 '14 at 1:23

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