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https://github.com/saucelabs/monocle

The following code is given as an example of standard event driven programming:

def get_cmd(conn):
    conn.read_until("\n", callback=handle_cmd)

def handle_cmd(conn, cmd):
    if cmd.type == "get-address":
        # keep track of the conn so we can write the response back!
        def callback(result):
            handle_user_query_result(conn, result)
        db.query(cmd.username, callback)
    else:
        conn.write("unknown command")

def handle_user_query_result(conn, user):
    conn.write(user.address)

Though I don't understand why a closure was needed. "keep track of the conn" contradicts how the first function "get_cmd" worked. Also, don't event driven frameworks usually let you pass parameters around?

I'm guessing this would have been a more legitimate example:

def get_cmd(conn):
    conn.read_until("\n", callback=handle_cmd)

def handle_cmd(conn, cmd):
    if cmd.type == "get-address":
        db.query(cmd.username, callback=handle_user_query_result, params=conn)
    else:
        conn.write("unknown command")

def handle_user_query_result(result, params):
    user = result
    conn = params
    conn.write(user.address)

Am I wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd say it's a poor example because it doesn't show just how bad callback-based event programming can be. The closure isn't necessary, but it (presumably) is used to keep things logically organized, making the code easier to read/reason about. It's quite common to write your callback as a closure. The whole point of the example is to illustrate how avoiding callbacks can make code more concise, arguably easier to read/write/reason about. Personally I'm not a fan of callback based programming, having used twisted and node.js a fair bit recently. Go write an application with either and then you'll appreciate monocle's approach (or not, some people prefer the callback-based approach).

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