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Is there a good way to tell who created a stored procedure in SQL Server 2005 (that also works in 2008)? In SQL Management Studio I can right mouse/properties on a proc to get the created date/time but how do I discover the creator?

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Good one, Mitch. +1 –  BuddyJoe Jan 7 at 15:01

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It may be too late for you now, but you can keep track of DDL activity.

We have a table in our administrative database that gets all the activity put in it. It uses a DDL trigger, new to 2005. These scripts create a table in your admin DB (SQL_DBA for me), create a trigger on the model db, create triggers on existing databases. I also created a sp_msforeachDB statement at the end to disable all of them.

One caveat - your databases need to be in compatibility mode of 90(in options for each db), otherwise you may start getting errors. The account in the EXECUTE AS part of the statement also needs access to insert into your admin table.

USE [SQL_DBA]
GO
/****** Object:  Table [dbo].[DDL_Login_Log]    Script Date: 03/03/2009 17:28:10 ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TABLE [dbo].[DDL_Login_Log](
    [DDL_Id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [PostTime] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [DB_User] [nvarchar](100) NULL,
    [DBName] [nvarchar](100) NULL,
    [Event] [nvarchar](100) NULL,
    [TSQL] [nvarchar](2000) NULL,
    [Object] [nvarchar](1000) NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_DDL_Login_Log] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [DDL_Id] ASC,
    [PostTime] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, STATISTICS_NORECOMPUTE  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, ALLOW_ROW_LOCKS  = ON, ALLOW_PAGE_LOCKS  = ON) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--This creates the trigger on the model database so all new DBs get it
USE [model]
GO
/****** Object:  DdlTrigger [ddl_DB_User]    Script Date: 03/03/2009 17:26:13 ******/
SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO
CREATE TRIGGER [ddl_DB_User] 
ON DATABASE
FOR DDL_DATABASE_SECURITY_EVENTS
AS 

DECLARE @data XML
declare @user nvarchar(100)

SET @data = EVENTDATA()
select @user = convert(nvarchar(100), SYSTEM_USER)

execute as login='domain\sqlagent'
INSERT sql_dba.dbo.DDL_Login_Log 
   (PostTime, DB_User, DBName, Event, TSQL,Object) 
   VALUES 
   (@data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/PostTime)[1]', 'nvarchar(100)'), 
   @user,
    db_name(),
    @data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/EventType)[1]', 'nvarchar(100)'), 
   @data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/TSQLCommand/CommandText)[1]','nvarchar(max)'),
    @data.value('(/EVENT_INSTANCE/ObjectName)[1]', 'nvarchar(1000)')
)

GO
SET ANSI_NULLS OFF
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER OFF
GO


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--CREATE TRIGGER IN ALL NON SYSTEM DATABASES

DECLARE @dataname varchar(255),
@dataname_header varchar(255),
@command VARCHAR(MAX),
@usecommand VARCHAR(100)
SET @command = '';
DECLARE datanames_cursor CURSOR FOR SELECT name FROM sys.databases 
WHERE name not in ('master', 'pubs', 'tempdb', 'model','msdb')
OPEN datanames_cursor
FETCH NEXT FROM datanames_cursor INTO @dataname
WHILE (@@fetch_status = 0)
BEGIN

PRINT '----------BEGIN---------'

PRINT 'DATANAME variable: ' + @dataname;

EXEC ('USE ' + @dataname);

PRINT 'CURRENT db: ' + db_name();

SELECT @command = 'CREATE TRIGGER DBA_Audit ON DATABASE
FOR DDL_DATABASE_LEVEL_EVENTS
AS
DECLARE @data XML
DECLARE @cmd NVARCHAR(1000)
DECLARE @posttime NVARCHAR(24)
DECLARE @spid NVARCHAR(6)
DECLARE @loginname NVARCHAR(100)
DECLARE @hostname NVARCHAR(100)
SET @data = EVENTDATA()
SET @cmd = @data.value(''(/EVENT_INSTANCE/TSQLCommand/CommandText)[1]'', ''NVARCHAR(1000)'')
SET @cmd = LTRIM(RTRIM(REPLACE(@cmd,'''','''')))
SET @posttime = @data.value(''(/EVENT_INSTANCE/PostTime)[1]'', ''DATETIME'')
SET @spid = @data.value(''(/EVENT_INSTANCE/SPID)[1]'', ''nvarchar(6)'')
SET @loginname = @data.value(''(/EVENT_INSTANCE/LoginName)[1]'',
    ''NVARCHAR(100)'')
SET @hostname = HOST_NAME()
INSERT INTO [DBA_AUDIT].dbo.AuditLog(Command, PostTime,HostName,LoginName)
 VALUES(@cmd, @posttime, @hostname, @loginname);'

 EXEC (@command);
 FETCH NEXT FROM datanames_cursor INTO @dataname;
PRINT '----------END---------'
END
CLOSE datanames_cursor
DEALLOCATE datanames_cursor

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

----Disable all triggers when things go haywire
sp_msforeachdb @command1='use [?]; IF  EXISTS (SELECT * FROM sys.triggers WHERE name = N''ddl_DB_User'' AND parent_class=0)disable TRIGGER [ddl_DB_User] ON DATABASE'
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But if you have your permissions/roles set up correctly, how often do you need this? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 0:39
    
If you have your system buttoned down tight, you may not need this. I have this list mailed to me daily for my own purposes I won't get into. –  Sam Mar 4 '09 at 6:07
    
+1 Cool concept. Forgot all about DDL Triggers. That might help for future "watching". But Mitch brings up a good point about security. –  BuddyJoe Mar 4 '09 at 17:31
    
Can I ask about the last line? what causes it to go all "haywire". Can you elaborate more at the end of your answer? –  BuddyJoe Mar 4 '09 at 17:37
    
If you apply this to all your production databases and something stops working, it's nice to be able to pull it all off quickly. I like to have things like this packaged up so it can be applied or removed easily. I wasn't totally serious about things going haywire. –  Sam Mar 4 '09 at 21:37

If it was not created too long ago, try this:

DECLARE @path varchar(256)

SELECT @path = path
FROM sys.traces
where id = 1

SELECT *
FROM fn_trace_gettable(@path, 1)

It selects the current (out of the box) default trace. If it was created recently (and the server hasn't been restarted recently), then the stored procedure object name and the login name that created it will be in the trace data.

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@Bruno Tyndall: so how did you go? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 0:35
    
This proc was created 3 years ago. Guess this would not work. Also, when I tried to run it I got "You do not have permission to run 'SYS.TRACES'." Guess I could ask the DBA to run it. But... –  BuddyJoe Mar 4 '09 at 17:33
    
I think what you are saying is the traces info is only good for about a day, a week, maybe a month? –  BuddyJoe Mar 4 '09 at 17:34
    
Correct, SQL Server doesn't keep its default trace data for very long as it would quickly fill the hard drive. –  mrdenny Mar 31 '09 at 4:46
    
A Blackbox trace can be very useful: mitch-wheat.blogspot.com/2009/01/… –  Mitch Wheat Mar 31 '09 at 15:19

I believe this is not available in SQL 2005. Certainly it's not available in the properties in SQL Management Studio, and not available in the sys.objects table or any others I can see.

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Along the same idea as Sam's, you could use a DDL trigger to capture the needed information, then send that data to a SQL Service broker queue, which could forward it to the Admin database (which could be on another server if needed) which would then hold all the DDL changes.

This would remove the permissions issue as the DDL trigger would be loading data into a Service Broker Queue at the local database and SQL handles the moving of the message to the other database.

There would be a bit more setup with this method, but once setup it would work no matter who made the object change.

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+1 this sounds pretty promising –  BuddyJoe Apr 1 '09 at 21:07
    
That is much more slick. Now, if we make a copy of a database and give it to the developer, they will get errors on ddl mods. –  Sam Jun 4 '09 at 20:53

How to get this piece of info ex post (especially years later) is most likely not possible.

However, you can use SQL Server Profiler to track DDL actions. In Event Selection, check the following events:

Objects / Object: Altered

Objects / Object: Created

Objects / Object: Deleted

There are also lots of customization options: you can save the output to a file or table, filter the output furthermore based on any columns etc. etc.

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