Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have been playing around with JavaScript and Canvas for a while. Very often when I dissect a code people have put on the web, it is really hard to understand the logic and algorithm behind the code if the code is poorly commented.

I would like to apply physics and maths to my code. Are there any good articles, resources hub or books I could learn more about it?

I am aware of few good physics library out there such as Box2D. However I am hoping to learn the basics rather than using the library blindly.

share|improve this question
    
Perhaps helpful: stackoverflow.com/search?q=[algorithm]+[math]+books –  Marcel Korpel May 22 '11 at 11:20

2 Answers 2

After some research, I think the Processing community has very good learning resources when it comes to advanced animation with physics and maths.

Check out this tutorial on vector. http://processing.org/learning/pvector/

It is really useful and easy to read. Definitely recommend everyone to look out for (soon to be released) The Nature of Code book by Daniel Shiffman http://learningprocessing.com/noc/

Looks promising.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Foundation HTML5 Animation with JavaScript by Keith Peters and Billy Lamberta is a really good book. I just started reading it. So far it is great. It covers many formulas and in-depth explanation on that. http://www.amazon.com/Foundation-HTML5-Animation-JavaScript-Lamberta/dp/1430236655

You could have a pretty thorough read on Google Books. http://books.google.co.nz/books?id=KZTIFYMLShYC&printsec=frontcover&dq=foundation+html5+animation+with+javascript&hl=en&sa=X&ei=XZhiT7q3L8eaiAfh0_DfBQ&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.