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While testing some scripts, I've noticed, if expiration time is little (not zero) - cookie isn't available in Chrome, Opera, IE.

Example:

<?php
// setting cookie for 5 minutes
setcookie( 'cookie1' , 'Test', time()+60*5 );
echo $_COOKIE['cookie1'];
// yeap (it should display it only with refresh of page - I know:)
?>

In Firefox - I see the word Test (after opening and refreshing the page).

But in other browser - I don't see this. If I change time to time()+60*100 for example - it works fine in all browsers.

What's the reason of this?

UPD:

From Chome Dev Tool (sorry, don't know how Chrome firebug is called):

Date:Sun, 22 May 2011 10:29:59 GMT
Keep-Alive:timeout=15, max=99
Server:Apache/2.2.14 (Ubuntu)
Set-Cookie:Maslo123=Test; expires=Sun, 22-May-2011 10:34:59 GMT

Date is early than 'expires';

share|improve this question
    
Did you check the actual Set-Cookie header field value? Your server might have a wrong system time. –  Gumbo May 22 '11 at 11:00
    
Yes, the time is wrong on server. (Few hours delaying) But how does this reflects on different browsers? –  Innuendo May 22 '11 at 11:07
    
@Innuendo: Um, could be a bug. But it would require more information to tell that. –  Gumbo May 22 '11 at 11:11
    
you shouldn't rely on cookies for short term/time storage, if you read the manual (specificity here) php.net/manual/en/function.setcookie.php#96813 your see the pitfuls with using cookies –  Loz Cherone ツ May 22 '11 at 11:20
    
@Lawrence Cherone: The statement you’ve linked to is wrong. The Expires value is an absolute time value as it refers to GMT no matter where the client/server is located. But it’s still true that an absolute time value fails if a machine does not use the correct time. –  Gumbo May 22 '11 at 11:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As we have already acquired that your server’s time is wrong by few hours and thus the cookies are already expired.

The reason why Firefox still stores the cookie might be that it detect the odd time difference between the server and the client and uses the difference between the Date value and the Expires attribute value to determine the cookie expiration date.

These issues are also the reason why latter RFC standards like the current RFC 6265 prefer the relative time value of delta seconds.

share|improve this answer
    
So Firefox checks only server time, but other time checks and local time too while getting cookie, and it occurs that this cookie is expired? –  Innuendo May 22 '11 at 12:38
    
@Innuendo: I don’t know it with certainty. But it seems to be the only reasonable reason. Did you check how long that cookie is valid in Firefox? –  Gumbo May 22 '11 at 12:43

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