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I am creating a C# WinForms application in VS 2010. I have 10 TextBoxes.

For TextBox1, I handled the events for GotFocus, LostFocus, etc. in the following manner:

this.richTextBox1.GotFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.RichTextBox1_GotFocus);
this.richTextBox1.LostFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.RichTextBox1_LostFocus);

private void TextBox1_GotFocus(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    TextBox1.BackColor = Color.White;
}

private void TextBox1_LostFocus(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    TextBox1.BackColor = Color.LightSteelBlue;
}

And now I need to write the same code for all of my textboxes. Is it instead possible to have a common GotFocus, LostFocus, etc. event handler method for all textboxes to do the above things?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you really need this for 10 different textboxes, the best (and most object-oriented) thing to do would be to create your own custom textbox control that inherits from System.Windows.Forms.TextBox.

Since you're inheriting from the base TextBox class, you get all of its functionality for free, and you can also implement the custom behavior that you want. Then just use this custom control as a drop-in replacement for the standard textbox control wherever you want controls with this behavior on your form. This way, you don't have to attach any event handlers at all! The behavior is built right into your control, following the guidelines of encapsulation and don't-repeat-yourself.

Sample class:

public class FocusChangeTextBox : TextBox
{
    public FocusChangeTextBox()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnGotFocus(EventArgs e)
    {
        // Call the base class implementation
        base.OnGotFocus();

        // Implement your own custom behavior
        this.BackColor = SystemColors.Window;
    }

    protected override void OnLostFocus(EventArgs e)
    {
        // Call the base class implementation
        base.OnLostFocus();

        // Implement your own custom behavior
        this.BackColor = Color.LightSteelBlue;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Of course:
Just make "normal" methods GotFocus, LostFocus etc. and let the events of all text boxes call those methods.


EDIT:

Okay, here you are:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.textBox1.GotFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.AllTextBoxes_GotFocus);
    this.textBox2.GotFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.AllTextBoxes_GotFocus);

    this.textBox1.LostFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.AllTextBoxes_LostFocus);
    this.textBox2.LostFocus += new System.EventHandler(this.AllTextBoxes_LostFocus);
}

private void AllTextBoxes_GotFocus(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    if (sender is TextBox)
    {
        ((TextBox)sender).BackColor = Color.White;
    }
}

private void AllTextBoxes_LostFocus(object sender, System.EventArgs e)
{
    if (sender is TextBox)
    {
        ((TextBox)sender).BackColor = Color.LightSteelBlue;
    }
}

There is only one method for GotFocus, and only one method for LostFocus.
There are two text boxes, and the events of both call the same GotFocus and LostFocus method.
The GotFocus and LostFocus methods have a reference to who called them (the first parameter "sender", so they know which text box to change.

share|improve this answer
    
Any sample codes for normal methods of GotFocus, LostFocus? – Paramu May 22 '11 at 15:07
    
Any Sample Codes will be Helpfull....Thanks – Paramu May 22 '11 at 15:10
    
ok, wait a second... – Christian Specht May 22 '11 at 15:12
    
If you only attach the event handler methods to TextBox controls, then there's no reason to check the sender parameter. And there's no reason you need to declare different handler methods. He could use the exact same code in the question. The secret is the += syntax to add an event handler. The answer could be a lot simpler. – Cody Gray May 22 '11 at 15:32

You can create a custom textbox and use that in stead of copying the same handling call for each textbox. Please take a look at this link for similar idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks To All Guidences – Paramu May 22 '11 at 15:39

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