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Learning C and this is an exercise.

The user is asked to input the dimension of an two-dimensional array. Then the user inputs the values of that array. Finally, the program must be able to sort every line from the lowest to the greatest and print the result.

For instance

input:

2 2
13 11
13 11

Should print:

11 13
11 13

But my program is printing:

11 13
13 11

If in my code I declare a fixed array size, lets say matrix[2][2] and change all the code to that array dimension, the program works great but if I declare matrix[MAX][MAX], since I don know what would be the size of the array, it gives me the output I've posted above.

Is this because I'm not using pointers and memory allocation? (Remember that I'm still learning C).

Here is the code I've done:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#define MAX 1000

/*Print the final two-dimensional array*/
void print( int a[MAX][MAX], int b[])
{
    int i,j;
    for (i=0; i<b[0]; i++)
    {
        for (j=0; j<b[1]; j++)
        {
            printf("%d", a[i][j]);
            if (j < b[1]-1)
            {
                printf(" ");
            }
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
}

/* Sort my array */
int Qsort (int v[MAX][MAX], int li, int ls)
{
    int j;
    if (li < ls)
    {
        j = order(v,li, ls);
        Qsort (v, li, j-1);
        Qsort (v, j+1, ls);
    }
    return v[MAX][MAX];
}


int order(int x[], int li, int ls)
{
    int a, down, up, temp;
    a=x[li]; down=li; up=ls;
    while (down<up)
    {
        while (x[down]<=a && down<ls)
            down ++;
        while (x[up]>a)
            up --;
        if (down < up)
        {
            temp=x[down];
            x[down]=x[up];
            x[up]=temp;
        }
    }
    x[li]=x[up];
    x[up]= a;
    return up;
}

int main()
{
    int i,j,size,jump,jump2;
    int tam[2];
    int matrix[MAX][MAX];

    /*Define rows and columms*/
    i=0;
    while (i<2)
    {
        scanf("%d", &tam[i]);
        i++;
    }

    /*Fill the array with the numbers the user inputs*/
    for (i=0; i<tam[0]; i++)
    {
        for (j=0; j<tam[1]; j++)
        {
            scanf("%d", &matrix[i][j]);
        }
    }

    size = tam[1];
    jump = 1;
    jump2 = 0;

    for(i=0;i<tam[0];i++)
    {
        Qsort (matrix,jump2, jump*size-1);
        jump++;
        jump2 = jump2 + size;

    }

    print (matrix,tam);

    return 0;
}

Thanks,

Favolas

share|improve this question
3  
Have you tried stepping through your code line-by-line in a debugger? –  Oliver Charlesworth May 22 '11 at 15:08
    
I don't understand the requirement: "sort every line from the lowest to the greatest and print the result". Does this mean you want to sort each row but leave the order as-is, or sort each column, or sort the order of the rows based on the values? Based on your example I guess it's the first - sort each row - but then you'd just need to loop through the entered rows and sort each one. Why are you then passing a 2D array into qsort? And then passing that 2D array into order which accepts a 1D array? –  Rup May 22 '11 at 15:10
1  
Hi there. Wen I compile it only gives me this warning: warning: implicit declaration of function ‘order’. Was this what you've asked? :) –  Favolas May 22 '11 at 15:11
    
Actually I think that's it - you're assuming the layout of the array in memory is row0, row1, row2 with no padding even when the length of the row is less than MAX. –  Rup May 22 '11 at 15:13
1  
That's another error: since order appears after qsort in the code you'll either need to declare it before qsort - add in a line int order(int x[], int li, int ls); with the semi-colon - or move the whole function above. Then it'll probably tell you that it can't convert int[][] to int[]. –  Rup May 22 '11 at 15:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It looks like you are sorting the first row over and over. You only want to pass a single column to Qsort so it should be declared:

Qsort(int v[MAX], int li, int ls)

In your main function, simply call Qsort with each successive row:

Qsort(matrix[i], 0, size-1);
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, you aren't sorting the first row over and over, but the rest of my answer still applies. You are treating matrix as a 1D array of ints when it is 2D. You don't need to keep track of jump2, let the compiler do it! –  andrewdski May 22 '11 at 15:18
    
Yes. It worked. Wen was I treating matrix as 1D? –  Favolas May 22 '11 at 15:33
    
When you were sorting the rows of the matrix, you had a jump2 variable. The purpose of this seemed to be to advance to the next row. You could have changed your original for loop to replace size by MAX and it likely would have worked as well. By doing that, you would be treating matrix as a one dimensional array of size MAX*MAX, with each row starting at matrix[i*MAX]. This is exactly what the compiler does "under the hood" for 2D matrices. –  andrewdski May 22 '11 at 15:52
    
@andrewdski Thanks. It makes sense. Now I understand –  Favolas May 22 '11 at 16:10
    
@andrewdski Using the same algorithm is it possible to sort the columns instead the rows? Tried in main something like Qsort(matrix[][i], 0, size-1); and modifying the code but get to no point. –  Favolas May 22 '11 at 18:39
#define MAX 1000
int matrix[MAX][MAX];

/*Fill the array with the numbers the user inputs*/
for (i=0; i<tam[0]; i++)
{
    for (j=0; j<tam[1]; j++)
    {
        scanf("%d", &matrix[i][j]);
    }
}

Given this matrix definition, your 2x2 data ends up in matrix[0][0], matrix[0][1], matrix[1][0] and matrix[1][1]. Nothing startling there, but when regarded as a linear list of cells, the populated cells are:

base_address + 0
base_address + 1
base_address + 1000
base_address + 1001

(where base_address = &matrix[0][0], of course.)

There is no way for your code to examine the latter two cells in the Qsort() code.

There are several conclusions to draw here.

  • Learn how to print good diagnostics.
  • Print data on entry to a routine. (If you printed the array on entry to Qsort(), you'd see that you don't have the values you thought you should have to work on. This makes sure you know how to access the data accurately.)
  • Choose good test data. Do not repeat numbers in your test data (so 11, 12, 13, 14 is a better set of inputs, for example).
  • Understand two dimensional arrays and slices of them.

Consider this diagram of a matrix[4][7]:

      0   1   2   3   4   5   6
    +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 0  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
    +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 1  |   | A | B | C |   |   |   |
    +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 2  |   | D | E | F |   |   |   |
    +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+
 3  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |
    +---+---+---+---+---+---+---+

If you want to pass the 6 lettered cells to a function as a sub-matrix, you need to pass the address of the cell containing A, you need to know that there are 3 columns and 2 rows, and you also need to know that the width of the whole matrix is 7. Without that 7, you aren't going to find the cells D, E, F. This is a miniature version of your 1000x1000 array, of course.

Your sub-matrix is the top, left-hand corner of the overall matrix, but the same rules apply: you need start address, width and height of sub-matrix, and overall width of the complete matrix to access the correct elements.

(Incidentally, when I first started this explanation, the matrix above was 4x6, not 4x7. Then explaining that the 6 that needs to be passed was not related to the product of 2x3 - the size of the sub-matrix - got tricky, so I changed my 'test case' to avoid the problem - exactly as suggested under 'choose good test data'.)


How to fix your code?

There are many ways, depending on what you want to do. The hard way passes the vital matrix-width parameter around. The easier ways probably allocate a 1-D array of cells and then calculate the subscripts manually. However, I'm not sure what you want given the input values 14, 13, 12, 11 (reverse order), the output matrix is supposed to be ... what?

12  11
14  13

This means you need to swap whole rows of your matrix.

share|improve this answer
    
Tanks for your explanation. You're right. Should have pick other values. If on the first row I have 34 22 14 15 and on the second row 40 47 63 32 the output should be 14 15 22 34 and 32 40 47 63 –  Favolas May 22 '11 at 18:34
    
@Favolas: OK - so you want to sort the elements in each row. Much easier! You don't have to worry about the rectangular subset problem (or the subset is always dimension 1, so you don't need the max width). –  Jonathan Leffler May 22 '11 at 20:43

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