Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a sha256 hash of some data that is a product ID for a registration system. I want to give this information to the end user, and I wish it to contain only printable characters (preferably a-z, A-Z and 0-9). I tried regular hex and base64, but they both produce very long results that are not satisfactory. I wish to represent the data in as small a format as possible in alphanumeric characters, but without losing integrity. Note that the data does not need to be converted back, so it can be a one-way process as long as no security is lost.

I am working in C.

Thanks in advance for any help on this!

Kind regards,

Philip Bennefall

share|improve this question
3  
"Note that the data does not need to be converted back, so it can be a one-way process as long as no security is lost." Then just print anything. –  iccthedral May 22 '11 at 16:14
4  
Base64 is specifically for your requirements, I can't see it being possible to improve that, certainly not by more than a couple of percent, unless by printable characters you can include non-ascii characters. –  Jodes May 22 '11 at 16:16
    
+1 to Base64. If you want to make it easier for a user to read, drop some dashes in at predefined points as MS do. You can strip off the trailing ='s if you need. –  Will A May 22 '11 at 16:18
    
So I gather then that base64 is indeed the best way of doing this? In that case I'll just stick with it and add dashes as suggested. Thanks! –  Philip Bennefall May 22 '11 at 16:51
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

32 bytes of data is going to be very difficult to meaningfully provide to a user in a medium that doesn't support cut/paste, however you represent it.

Lessen the amount of data you're using for the product ID and you can use Base-64 and friends.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If Base64 isn't adequate for your 32 bytes, MD5 it down to 16 bytes -- shazam, now it's half as long.

Why, yes it is absurd to hash a 32 byte hash down to 16 bytes, but that's basically what you're asking to do, whether it's 16 or any other number of bytes. You WILL lose information.

Or simply use MD5 to begin with, since it's a smaller hash.

If the user isn't going to key this number in, how important is the representation anyway? All of these long hash dumps are inscrutable. When I see them I just look at the last 3 characters anyway.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.