Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been studying rvalue references lately and came to a conclusion that it's quite advantageous to use pass-by-value everywhere where complete copy of an object will be made (for complete justification see e.g. here and here), because the compiler can automatically optimize a copy away in cases such as f(std::move(a));, where f is defined as void f(A a);.

One negative consequence of pass-by-value-everywhere is that all the come becomes littered with std::move even in simple cases such as:

void Object::value(A a) 
{
    value_ = std::move(a);
}

Obviously, if I wrote only the following:

void Object::value(A a) 
{
    value_ = a;
}

it shouldn't be hard for the compiler to recognize that a is near the end of its lifetime even without the hint and not to penalize me with additional copy. In fact, the compiler should be able to recognize this even in complex functions.

The questions:

1) Is this optimization allowed by the C++0x Standard?

2) Do the compilers employ it? Even in complex cases, i.e. the function consists from more than one line?

3) How reliable is this optimization, i.e. can I expect the compiler to utilize it as much as I expect the compiler to apply Return Value Optimization?

share|improve this question
2  
"use pass-by-value everywhere" -- Please, don't do this. Only do it if you'd make a copy of the parameter inside the function anyways, not just everywhere! –  Xeo May 22 '11 at 17:07
    
@jons34yp is it not better to always pass-by-constant-reference? –  Yet Another Geek May 22 '11 at 17:09
    
@Yet: It is better to judge for each case what suits best. –  Björn Pollex May 22 '11 at 17:13
1  
The problem with passing by value everywhere is that in case you call the function with an object which cannot be moved is that you'll have to create a copy. So it's better to pass by reference if you are not going to change the object anyway. –  RedX May 22 '11 at 17:17
1  
@Yet: As Xeo already mentioned, one instance is when you would copy the parameter anyway. Pass-by-value gives the compiler the opportunity to do copy-ellision. –  Björn Pollex May 22 '11 at 17:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Is this optimization allowed by the C++0x Standard?

No.

Do the compilers employ it? Even in complex cases, i.e. the function consists from more than one line?

No.

How reliable is this optimization, i.e. can I expect the compiler to utilize it as much as I expect the compiler to apply Return Value Optimization?

You should decorate A(const A&) and A(A&&) with print statements and run test cases of interest to you. Don't forget to test lvalue arguments if those use cases are part of your design.

The correct answers will depend upon how expensive the copy and move of A are,how many arguments Object::value actually has, and how much code repetition you're willing to put up with.

Finally, be very suspicious of any guideline that contains words like "always" or "everywhere". E.g. I use goto every once in a while. But other programmers have words like "never" associated with goto. But every once in a while, you can't beat a goto for both speed and clarity.

There will be times you should favor a pair of foo(const A&) foo(A&&) over foo(A). And times you won't. Your experiments with decorated copy and move members will guide you.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't see why not. We have to create a model of execution somewhere, and I think in that model we'll find that it doesn't make sense to keep a value around after its last use. Ergo if it is indeed the last use and that last use is assignment/initialization, we can move it instead of copy it. This would be without loss because in our model moving is never more expensive than copying, and moving is intended to transfer a value. (That is, it operates under the as-if principle.) –  GManNickG May 22 '11 at 18:32
1  
It is difficult to define "last use". Even with the definition we currently have, it is possible to detect the implicit-move optimization (and thus it really isn't an optimization). But compromises were reached. What helped in reaching those compromises was tying it to the return value optimization (which is also detectable). Example: put a B b(a); prior to your "last use". Now if you move from a, b.~B() can detect the move by storing a reference to a. –  Howard Hinnant May 22 '11 at 20:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.