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The box this query is running on is a dedicated server running in a datacenter.

AMD Opteron 1354 Quad-Core 2.20GHz 2GB of RAM Windows Server 2008 x64 (Yes I know I only have 2GB of RAM, I'm upgrading to 8GB when the project goes live).

So I went through and created 250,000 dummy rows in a table to really stress test some queries that LINQ to SQL generates and make sure they're not to terrible and I noticed one of them was taking an absurd amount of time.

I had this query down to 17 seconds with indexes but I removed them for the sake of this answer to go from start to finish. Only indexes are Primary Keys.

Stories table --
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[UserID] [int] NOT NULL,
[CategoryID] [int] NOT NULL,
[VoteCount] [int] NOT NULL,
[CommentCount] [int] NOT NULL,
[Title] [nvarchar](96) NOT NULL,
[Description] [nvarchar](1024) NOT NULL,
[CreatedAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[UniqueName] [nvarchar](96) NOT NULL,
[Url] [nvarchar](512) NOT NULL,
[LastActivityAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,

Categories table --
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[ShortName] [nvarchar](8) NOT NULL,
[Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,

Users table --
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
[Username] [nvarchar](32) NOT NULL,
[Password] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
[Email] [nvarchar](320) NOT NULL,
[CreatedAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[LastActivityAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,

Currently in the database there is 1 user, 1 category and 250,000 stories and I tried to run this query.

SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = Stories.CategoryID
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = Stories.UserID
ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt

Query takes 52 seconds to run, CPU usage hovers at 2-3%, Membery is 1.1GB, 900MB free but the Disk usage seems out of control. It's @ 100MB/sec with 2/3 of that being writes to tempdb.mdf and the rest is reading from tempdb.mdf.

Now for the interesting part...

SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = Stories.CategoryID
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = Stories.UserID

SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = Stories.UserID
ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt

SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = Stories.CategoryID
ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt

All 3 of these queries are pretty much instant.

Exec plan for first query.
http://i43.tinypic.com/xp6gi1.png

Exec plans for other 3 queries (in order).
http://i43.tinypic.com/30124bp.png
http://i44.tinypic.com/13yjml1.png
http://i43.tinypic.com/33ue7fb.png

Any help would be much appreciated.

Exec plan after adding indexes (down to 17 seconds again).
http://i39.tinypic.com/2008ytx.png

I've gotten a lot of helpful feedback from everyone and I thank you, I tried a new angle at this. I query the stories I need, then in separate queries get the Categories and Users and with 3 queries it only took 250ms... I don't understand the issue but if it works and at 250ms no less for the time being I'll stick with that. Here's the code I used to test this.

DBDataContext db = new DBDataContext();
Console.ReadLine();

Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();

var stories = db.Stories.OrderBy(s => s.LastActivityAt).Take(10).ToList();
var storyIDs = stories.Select(c => c.ID);
var categories = db.Categories.Where(c => storyIDs.Contains(c.ID)).ToList();
var users = db.Users.Where(u => storyIDs.Contains(u.ID)).ToList();

sw.Stop();
Console.WriteLine(sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);
share|improve this question
    
suggest you post the execution plans... –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 2:01
    
Where is your tempDB located? Is it on a seperate physical spindle? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 2:03
    
Where are your data, log files? On seperate physical drives? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 2:04
    
Why did you remove indexes? –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 2:07
    
Added the exec plan. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 2:08
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8 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Try adding an index on Stories.LastActivityAt. I think the clustered index scan in the execution plan may be due to the sorting.

Edit: Since my query returned in an instant with rows just a few bytes long, but has been running for 5 minutes already and is still going after I added a 2K varchar, I think Mitch has a point. It is the volume of that data that is shuffled around for nothing, but this can be fixed in the query.

Try putting the join, sort and top(10) in a view or in a nested query, and then join back against the story table to get the rest of the data just for the 10 rows that you need.

Like this:

select * from 
(
    SELECT TOP(10) id, categoryID, userID
    FROM Stories
    ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt
) s
INNER JOIN Stories ON Stories.ID = s.id
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = s.CategoryID
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = s.UserID

If you have an index on LastActivityAt, this should run very fast.

share|improve this answer
    
Total execution time 25 25.0000 You the man! –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 3:55
    
Nice one. I'm surprised the optimiser can't perform that optimisation. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 5:07
    
+1. The irony is, I have done something very similiar recently for a query on SQL 2008, but it never occurred to me that it could be the same problem!! –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 5:09
    
@Chad Moran: That all said, you still need to get your hardware set up correctly! –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 5:10
    
@Mitch yeah you're right. When it comes time to go Production I'll make sure SoftLayer hooks up 3 other HDDs and I'll go RAID 0 on it, thanks for the tip! : ) –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 5:38
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So if I read the first part correctly, it responds in 17 seconds with an index. Which is still a while to chug out 10 records. I'm thinking the time is in the order by clause. I would want an index on LastActivityAt, UserID, CategoryID. Just for fun, remove the order by and see if it returns the 10 records quickly. If it does, then you know it is not in the joins to the other tables. Also it would be helpful to replace the * with the columns needed as all 3 table columns are in the tempdb as you are sorting - as Neil mentioned.

Looking at the execution plans you'll notice the extra sort - I believe that is the order by which is going to take some time. I'm assuming you had an index with the 3 and it was 17 seconds... so you may want one index for the join criteria (userid, categoryID) and another for lastactivityat - see if that performs better. Also it would be good to run the query thru the index tuning wizard.

share|improve this answer
    
I would agree with that. The order by must take time if there is no index. I don't see that in the execution plans, though. Weird. –  cdonner Mar 4 '09 at 2:27
    
Yeah I ran it through the tuning wizard and after adding the recommendations it got it down to 17 seconds. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 2:34
    
Yeah removing the ORDER BY makes it pretty much instant. Funny thing is if I remove one of the INNER JOINS and leave the ORDER BY it's just as fast. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 2:36
    
That is good, did adding an extra index just on LastActivityAt help the order by then? –  Dave Gorman Mar 4 '09 at 2:45
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My first suggestion is to remove the *, and replace it with the minimum columns you need.

second, is there a trigger involved? Something that would update the LastActivityAt field?

share|improve this answer
    
Right, with LINQ to SQL it's really a pain to selectively load columns. I fully understand it's possible but I've used ORMs at previous jobs that used SELECT * on tables that had millions of rows. I understand it's bad but I've never seen this kind of detriment of performance. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 2:11
    
ya, limiting the columns was kind of a stab in the dark, not much else I could come up with besides playing with the indexes. –  Neil N Mar 4 '09 at 2:25
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Based on your problem query, try add a combination index on table Stories (CategoryID, UserID, LastActivityAt)

share|improve this answer
    
Might not be used, due to SELECT * –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 2:30
    
Yeah, bumped it up to 1 minute 2 seconds. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 2:33
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You are maxing out the Disks in your hardware setup.

Given your comments about your Data/Log/tempDB File placement, I think any amount of tuning is going to be a bandaid.

250,000 Rows is small. Imagine how bad your problems are going to be with 10 million rows.

I suggest you move tempDB onto its own physical drive (preferable a RAID 0).

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah I think you're right but it just doesn't seem right that I can use 3 separate queries to get the same data in less than 250ms. Sounds like the query plan is getting screwed up, gonna hit up some MS people tonight. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 3:17
    
@Chad Moran: hate to be a pessimist, but I reckon the MS folks will give you the same advice. As soon as any query plan needs to use tempDB you are almost certainly going to have a bottleneck –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 3:52
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Ok, so my test machine isn't fast. Actually it's really slow. It 1.6 ghz,n 1 gb of ram, No multiple disks, just a single (read slow) disk for sql server, os, and extras.

I created your tables with primary and foreign keys defined. Inserted 2 categories, 500 random users, and 250000 random stories.

Running the first query above takes 16 seconds (no plan cache either). If I index the LastActivityAt column I get results in under a second (no plan cache here either).

Here's the script I used to do all of this.

    --Categories table --
Create table Categories (
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) primary key NOT NULL,
[ShortName] [nvarchar](8) NOT NULL,
[Name] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL)

--Users table --
Create table Users(
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) primary key NOT NULL,
[Username] [nvarchar](32) NOT NULL,
[Password] [nvarchar](64) NOT NULL,
[Email] [nvarchar](320) NOT NULL,
[CreatedAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[LastActivityAt] [datetime] NOT NULL
)
go

-- Stories table --
Create table Stories(
[ID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) primary key NOT NULL,
[UserID] [int] NOT NULL references Users ,
[CategoryID] [int] NOT NULL references Categories,
[VoteCount] [int] NOT NULL,
[CommentCount] [int] NOT NULL,
[Title] [nvarchar](96) NOT NULL,
[Description] [nvarchar](1024) NOT NULL,
[CreatedAt] [datetime] NOT NULL,
[UniqueName] [nvarchar](96) NOT NULL,
[Url] [nvarchar](512) NOT NULL,
[LastActivityAt] [datetime] NOT NULL)

Insert into Categories (ShortName, Name) 
Values ('cat1', 'Test Category One')

Insert into Categories (ShortName, Name) 
Values ('cat2', 'Test Category Two')

--Dummy Users
Insert into Users
Select top 500
UserName=left(SO.name+SC.name, 32)
, Password=left(reverse(SC.name+SO.name), 64)
, Email=Left(SO.name, 128)+'@'+left(SC.name, 123)+'.com'
, CreatedAt='1899-12-31'
, LastActivityAt=GETDATE()
from sysobjects SO 
Inner Join syscolumns SC on SO.id=SC.id
go

--dummy stories!
-- A Count is given every 10000 record inserts (could be faster)
-- RBAR method!
set nocount on
Declare @count as bigint
Set @count = 0
begin transaction
while @count<=250000
begin
Insert into Stories
Select
  USERID=floor(((500 + 1) - 1) * RAND() + 1)
, CategoryID=floor(((2 + 1) - 1) * RAND() + 1)
, votecount=floor(((10 + 1) - 1) * RAND() + 1)
, commentcount=floor(((8 + 1) - 1) * RAND() + 1)
, Title=Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))+Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))
, Description=Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))+Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))+Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))
, CreatedAt='1899-12-31'
, UniqueName=Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))+Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36)) 
, Url=Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))+Cast(NEWID() as VARCHAR(36))
, LastActivityAt=Dateadd(day, -floor(((600 + 1) - 1) * RAND() + 1), GETDATE())
If @count % 10000=0
Begin
Print @count
Commit
begin transaction
End
Set @count=@count+1
end 
set nocount off
go

--returns in 16 seconds
DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS
SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = Stories.CategoryID
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = Stories.UserID
ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt
go

--Now create an index
Create index IX_LastADate on Stories (LastActivityAt asc)
go
--With an index returns in less than a second
DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS
SELECT TOP(10) *
FROM Stories
INNER JOIN Categories ON Categories.ID = Stories.CategoryID
INNER JOIN Users ON Users.ID = Stories.UserID
ORDER BY Stories.LastActivityAt
go

The sort is definitely where your slow down is occuring. Sorting mainly gets done in the tempdb and a large table will cause LOTS to be added. Having an index on this column will definitely improve performance on an order by.

Also, defining your Primary and Foreign Keys helps SQL Server immensly

Your method that is listed in your code is elegant, and basically the same response that cdonner wrote except in c# and not sql. Tuning the db will probably give even better results!

--Kris

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Have you cleared the SQL Server cache before running each of the query?

In SQL 2000, it's something like DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS. Google the command for more info.

Looking at the query, I would have an index for

Categories.ID Stories.CategoryID Users.ID Stories.UserID

and possibly Stories.LastActivityAt

But yeah, sounds like the result could be bogus 'cos of caching.

share|improve this answer
    
@Robo: It's actually DBCC FREEPROCCACHE –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '09 at 3:06
    
Tried with no avail. –  Chad Moran Mar 4 '09 at 3:21
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When you have worked with SQL Server for some time, you will discover that even the smallest changes to a query can cause wildly different response times. From what I have read in the initial question, and looking at the query plan, I suspect that the optimizer has decided that the best approach is to form a partial result and then sort that as a separate step. The partial result is a composite of the Users and Stories tables. This is formed in tempdb. So the excessive disk access is due to the forming and then sorting of this temporary table.

I concur that the solution should be to create a compound index on Stories.LastActivityAt, Stories.UserId, Stories.CategoryId. The order is VERY important, the field LastActivityAt must be first.

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