Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this program piece:

double stockWeight = 1;
    if(data[0] > 9 )        
        stockWeight = 1000*R(data[0]/10);
    double compare = data[0]*100-stockWeight;
    System.out.println(compare);
    if(compare > 300.0 && compare <=600.0)
        stockWeight += 300;
    else if(compare > 600.0 && compare <= 900.0)
        stockWeight += 600;
    else if(compare > 900.0);
        stockWeight += 900;

        System.out.println(stockWeight);

 ///////////////////////////////////
   private int R(double D){
      int howBIG = 1;
      if (D >= 100){howBIG = 10;}
      else if(D >= 1000){howBIG = 100;}
      DecimalFormat F = new DecimalFormat("#");
      return Integer.valueOf(F.format(D/howBIG))*howBIG;
  }

the output is:

126.0
1900.0

All numbers here are double type. data[0] = 11.26 why does my computer think that 126.0 is greater than 900.0?? R method basically is div function of 10(100) if greater than 100(1000), gives whole number

share|improve this question
    
Your code snippet includes some free-standing statements, and then a function. How does this all run? And your code only has a single println(), yet your output appears to have two separate lines... –  Oliver Charlesworth May 22 '11 at 18:54
    
Why are you using a bleedin' DecimalFormat to round a double? I suggest investigating java.lang.Math. –  Matt Ball May 22 '11 at 19:08
    
The indentation on this code is horrendous. Confusing and contradictory. p.s. with if (D >= 100){howBIG = 10;} else if(D >= 1000){howBIG = 100;}, the else clause will NEVER get executed :) –  Chris Dennett May 22 '11 at 19:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are likely seeing the confusing result because of the stray semicolon in your last else statement:

else if(compare > 900.0);

So this line doesn't depend on the else clause and will always be executed:

stockWeight += 900;

Essentially you will always add 900 to the stockWeight immediately before the last print statement, whether or not compare > 900.0.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for your sharp eyes –  Simon Nickerson May 22 '11 at 19:14
    
!!! didn't see that semicolon...I guess i am too tired =], thanks –  Medardas May 22 '11 at 19:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.