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Installing RVM on Ubuntu 11.04.

Followed the instructions here: http://ryanbigg.com/2010/12/ubuntu-ruby-rvm-rails-and-you

When it comes time to install Ruby, I get a permission denied exception.

kevinwmerritt@ubuntu:~$ rvm install 1.8.7
bash: /home/kevinwmerritt/.rvm/scripts/manage: Permission denied

The .rvm folder appears in my home directory and the bash scripts initialize rvm successfully.

Using sudo yields the following:

sudo rvm install 1.8.7
sudo: rvm: command not found

I am new to Ubuntu.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am running into the same exact problem. I compared it against another installation of rvm on a different box that is working and noticed the permission for "manage" is different.

The box that is working:

-rwxr-xr-x  1 deployer deployer 59002 2011-05-19 22:56 manage

The box that is not working:

-rw-r--r--  1 deployer deployer 59076 2011-05-22 22:12 manage

I did a chmod 755 manage and that seems to have fixed it. I installed rvm the same way on both boxes, not sure why there's a difference.

You can try chmod 755 /home/kevinwmerritt/.rvm/scripts/manage and see if that resolves it

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Thanks Jhony for spelling it out for me! It looks like that did the trick. –  kevinwmerritt May 22 '11 at 22:29

If you did a single-user install of RVM do not use:

sudo rvm install 1.8.7

RVM creates its own sandbox in ~/.rvm which does not need root privileges ever. At NO time do you need to use sudo before rvm. sudo will only screw up everything.

Use an unadorned rvm install 1.8.7 or rvm install 1.9.2 or any other version of Ruby known to RVM. You can see the list it knows about using rvm list.

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I can confirm that using sudo with a single-user tended to never quite work. I made the effort to remove rvm and start from scratch, making sure to at no time use sudo. It made a massive difference and everything worked fine after that. Changing permissions didn't seem right. –  Emile Aug 18 '12 at 18:07

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