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Pre-Honeycomb, each Activity was registered to handle button clicks via the onClick tag in a Layout's XML.

android:onClick="myClickMethod"

Within that method you can use view.getId() and a switch statement to do the button logic.

With the introduction of Honeycomb I'm breaking these Activities into Fragments which can be reused inside many different Activities. Most of the behavior of the buttons is Activity independent and I would like the code to reside inside the Fragments file without using the old (pre 1.6) method of registering the OnClickListener for each button.

 final Button button = (Button) findViewById(R.id.button_id);
     button.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
         public void onClick(View v) {
             // Perform action on click
         }
     });

The problem is that when my layout's are inflated it is still the hosting Activity that is receiving the button clicks, not the individual Fragments. Is there a good approach to either

  • Register the fragment to receive the button clicks?
  • Pass the click events from the Activity to the fragment they belong to?
share|improve this question
1  
Can't you handle registering listeners within the onCreate of the fragment? –  Jodes May 22 '11 at 22:24
12  
@jodes Yes, but I don't want to have to use setOnClickListener and findViewById for each button, that's why onClick was added, to make things simpler. –  smith324 May 22 '11 at 22:35
    
Looking at the accepted answer I think using setOnClickListener is more loosely coupled than sticking to the XML onClick approach. If the activity has to 'forward' each click to the right fragment this means that code will have to change each time a fragment is added. Using an interface to decouple from the fragment's base class does not help with that. If the fragment registers with the correct button itself, the activity remains completely agnostic which is better style IMO. See also the answer from Adorjan Princz. –  Adriaan Koster Dec 10 at 14:11

9 Answers 9

up vote 72 down vote accepted

Could you not just do this:

Activity:

Fragment someFragment;    

...onCreate etc instantiating your fragments

public void myClickMethod(View v){
    someFragment.myClickMethod(v);
}

Fragment:

 public void myClickMethod(View v){
    switch(v.getid()){
       // Just like you were doing
    }
 }    

In response to @Ameen who wanted less coupling so Fragments are reuseable

Interface:

public interface XmlClickable {
    void myClickMethod(View v);
}

Activity:

XmlClickable someFragment;    

...onCreate etc instantiating your fragments casting to your interface

public void myClickMethod(View v){
    someFragment.myClickMethod(v);
}

Fragment:

 public class SomeFragment implements XmlClickable {

 ...onCreateView etc

 @Override
 public void myClickMethod(View v){
    switch(v.getid()){
       // Just like you were doing
    }
 }    
share|improve this answer
36  
That's what I'm doing now essentially but it is a lot messier when you have multiple fragments that each need to receive click events. I'm just aggravated with fragments in general because paradigms have dissolved around them. –  smith324 Jun 9 '11 at 0:47
    
It doesn't get much messier, as you just pass it the click even to all your fragments and only the one with the ID will react, but yeah they have thrown a fly in the oitment –  Blundell Jun 9 '11 at 7:37
    
Lovely! This isn't messy at all, even makes it easier for other people to read the code (as they don't have to guess where the actual call ends up). :-) –  ninetwozero Jan 31 '12 at 18:50
78  
I'm running into the same issue, and even though I appreciate your response, this is not clean code from a software engineering point of view. This code results in the activity being tightly coupled with the fragment. You should be able to re-use the same fragment in multiple activities without the activities knowing the implementation details of the fragments. –  Ameen Feb 8 '13 at 2:20
2  
Instead of defining your own Interface, you can use the already existing OnClickListener as mentioned by Euporie. –  fr00tyl00p Sep 7 at 11:50

I prefer using the following solution for handling onClick events. This works for Activity and Fragments as well.

public class StartFragment extends Fragment implements OnClickListener{

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container,
            Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        View v = inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_start, container, false);

        Button b = (Button) v.findViewById(R.id.StartButton);
        b.setOnClickListener(this);
        return v;
    }

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        switch (v.getId()) {
        case R.id.StartButton:

            ...

            break;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
60  
This is a much better solution than the accepted answer. –  Nathan Osman Mar 16 '13 at 5:17
8  
In onCreateView, I loop through all the child items of the ViewGroup v and set the onclicklistener for all the Button instances that I find. It's much better than manually setting the listener for all buttons. –  A Person Mar 21 '13 at 15:24
9  
Voted. This makes the fragments reusable. Otherwise why using fragments? –  boreas May 29 '13 at 16:00
23  
Isn't this the same technique advocated by Programming Windows back in 1987? Not to worry. Google moves fast and is all about developer productivity. I'm sure it won't be long until event handling is as good as 1991-eara Visual Basic. –  Edward Brey Oct 18 '13 at 14:06
3  
witch import have you used for OnClickListener? Intellij suggests me android.view.View.OnClickListener and it doesn't work :/ (onClick never runs) –  Lucas Jota Nov 29 '13 at 13:26

The problem I think is that the view is still the activity, not the fragment. The fragments doesn't have any independent view of its own and is attached to the parent activities view. Thats why the event ends up in the Activity, not the fragment. Its unfortunate, but I think you will need some code to make this work.

What I've been doing during conversions is simply adding a click listener that calls the old event handler.

for instance:

final Button loginButton = (Button) view.findViewById(R.id.loginButton);
    loginButton.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener() {
        @Override
        public void onClick(final View v) {
            onLoginClicked(v);
        }
    });
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks - I used this with one slight modification in that I'm passing the fragment view (ie. the result of inflater.inflate(R.layout.my_fragment_xml_resource)) to onLoginClicked() so that it can access the fragments sub-views, such as an EditText, via view.findViewById() (If I simply pass through the activity view, calls to view.findViewById(R.id.myfragmentwidget_id) returns null). –  Michael Nelson Jan 1 '13 at 10:20

This is another way:

1.Create a BaseFragment like this:

public abstract class BaseFragment extends Fragment implements OnClickListener

2.Use

public class FragmentA extends BaseFragment 

instead of

public class FragmentA extends Fragment

3.In your activity:

public class MainActivity extends ActionBarActivity implements OnClickListener

and

BaseFragment fragment = new FragmentA;

public void onClick(View v){
    fragment.onClick(v);
}

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
1 year, 1 month and 1 day after your answer: Is there any reason other than not repeating implementation of OnClickListener on every Fragment class to create the abstract BaseFragment? –  Dimitrios K. Nov 24 at 22:09

I would rather go for the click handling in code than using the onClick attribute in xml when working with fragments. This becomes even easier when migrating your activities to fragments. You can just call the click handler(previously set to android:onClick in xml) directly from each case block.

findViewById(R.id.button_login).setOnClickListener(clickListener);
...

OnClickListener clickListener = new OnClickListener() {
    @Override
    public void onClick(final View v) {
        switch(v.getId()) {
           case R.id.button_login:
              // which is supposed to be called automatically
              // in your activity, which has now changed to a fragment.
              onLoginClick(v);   
              break;

           case R.id.button_logout:
              ...
        }
    }
}

When it comes to handling clicks in fragments, this looks simpler to me than android:onClick.

share|improve this answer

ButterKnife is probably the best solution for the clutter problem. It uses annotation processors to generate the so called "old method" boilerplate code.

But the onClick method can still be used, with a custom inflator.

How to use

@Override
public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup cnt, Bundle state) {
    inflater = FragmentInflatorFactory.inflatorFor(inflater, this);
    return inflater.inflate(R.layout.fragment_main, cnt, false);
}

Implementation

public class FragmentInflatorFactory implements LayoutInflater.Factory {

    private static final int[] sWantedAttrs = { android.R.attr.onClick };

    private static final Method sOnCreateViewMethod;
    static {
        // We could duplicate its functionallity.. or just ignore its a protected method.
        try {
            Method method = LayoutInflater.class.getDeclaredMethod(
                    "onCreateView", String.class, AttributeSet.class);
            method.setAccessible(true);
            sOnCreateViewMethod = method;
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
            // Public API: Should not happen.
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

    private final LayoutInflater mInflator;
    private final Object mFragment;

    public FragmentInflatorFactory(LayoutInflater delegate, Object fragment) {
        if (delegate == null || fragment == null) {
            throw new NullPointerException();
        }
        mInflator = delegate;
        mFragment = fragment;
    }

    public static LayoutInflater inflatorFor(LayoutInflater original, Object fragment) {
        LayoutInflater inflator = original.cloneInContext(original.getContext());
        FragmentInflatorFactory factory = new FragmentInflatorFactory(inflator, fragment);
        inflator.setFactory(factory);
        return inflator;
    }

    @Override
    public View onCreateView(String name, Context context, AttributeSet attrs) {
        if ("fragment".equals(name)) {
            // Let the Activity ("private factory") handle it
            return null;
        }

        View view = null;

        if (name.indexOf('.') == -1) {
            try {
                view = (View) sOnCreateViewMethod.invoke(mInflator, name, attrs);
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                throw new AssertionError(e);
            } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                if (e.getCause() instanceof ClassNotFoundException) {
                    return null;
                }
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            }
        } else {
            try {
                view = mInflator.createView(name, null, attrs);
            } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
                return null;
            }
        }

        TypedArray a = context.obtainStyledAttributes(attrs, sWantedAttrs);
        String methodName = a.getString(0);
        a.recycle();

        if (methodName != null) {
            view.setOnClickListener(new FragmentClickListener(mFragment, methodName));
        }
        return view;
    }

    private static class FragmentClickListener implements OnClickListener {

        private final Object mFragment;
        private final String mMethodName;
        private Method mMethod;

        public FragmentClickListener(Object fragment, String methodName) {
            mFragment = fragment;
            mMethodName = methodName;
        }

        @Override
        public void onClick(View v) {
            if (mMethod == null) {
                Class<?> clazz = mFragment.getClass();
                try {
                    mMethod = clazz.getMethod(mMethodName, View.class);
                } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
                    throw new IllegalStateException(
                            "Cannot find public method " + mMethodName + "(View) on "
                                    + clazz + " for onClick");
                }
            }

            try {
                mMethod.invoke(mFragment, v);
            } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                throw new RuntimeException(e);
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                throw new AssertionError(e);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can define a callback as an attribute of your xml layout. The article below will show you how to do it for a custom widget.

http://kevindion.com/2011/01/custom-xml-attributes-for-android-widgets/

credit goes to Kevin Dion :)

I'm investigating whether i can add styleable attributes to the base Fragment class.

The basic idea is to have the same functionality that View implements when dealing with the onClick callback.

I will post an update after I figure out how to do it for the existing Fragment class.

share|improve this answer
    
This is awesome, but a little too much work. Hopefully Android will do this for us in the future. –  MageWind Sep 20 '13 at 13:39

Adding to Blundell's answer,
If you have more fragments, with plenty of onClicks:

Activity:

Fragment someFragment1 = (Fragment)getFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag("someFragment1 "); 
Fragment someFragment2 = (Fragment)getFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag("someFragment2 "); 
Fragment someFragment3 = (Fragment)getFragmentManager().findFragmentByTag("someFragment3 "); 

...onCreate etc instantiating your fragments

public void myClickMethod(View v){
  if (someFragment1.isVisible()) {
       someFragment1.myClickMethod(v);
  }else if(someFragment2.isVisible()){
       someFragment2.myClickMethod(v);
  }else if(someFragment3.isVisible()){
       someFragment3.myClickMethod(v); 
  }

} 

In Your Fragment:

  public void myClickMethod(View v){
     switch(v.getid()){
       // Just like you were doing
     }
  } 
share|improve this answer

This has been working for me:(Android studio)

 @Override
    public View onCreateView(LayoutInflater inflater, ViewGroup container, Bundle savedInstanceState) {

        View rootView = inflater.inflate(R.layout.update_credential, container, false);
        Button bt_login = (Button) rootView.findViewById(R.id.btnSend);

        bt_login.setOnClickListener(new View.OnClickListener() {
            @Override
            public void onClick(View view) {

                System.out.println("Hi its me");


            }// end onClick
        });

        return rootView;

    }// end onCreateView
share|improve this answer
    
This duplicates the @Brill Pappin's answer. –  naXa Dec 18 at 9:17

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