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I'm running into some sort of event loop issue when making real time changes to browser.xul from a Firefox extension. Changes I am making to the browser.xul are not reflected in the browser window until my code finishes. This happens even when I use setTimeout.

I have an example that demonstrates the issue below. When I click on the "xultest runtest" button nothing happens for a few seconds and then the xultest-text is shown as XXXXXXXXXX. I never see the XX,XXX,XXXX... in between.

Can someone explain what is going on with the browser.xul event loop and how to work around it (thanks!)?

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<?xml-stylesheet href="css/overlay.css" type="text/css"?>
<overlay id="xultest-overlay" xmlns="http://www.mozilla.org/keymaster/gatekeeper/there.is.only.xul">
    <script type="text/javascript">
        <![CDATA[
        function xultestRunTest2() {
            for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                setTimeout(function() {
                        document.getElementById("xultest-text").value =
                            document.getElementById("xultest-text").value + "X" },
                    5000);
            }
        }
        ]]>
    </script>
    <toolbox id="navigator-toolbox">
        <toolbar id="xultest-toolbar" toolbarname="xultesttoolbar" class="chromeclass-toolbar" context="toolbar-context-menu" hidden="false" persist="hidden">
            <toolbarbutton oncommand="xultestRunTest2();" label="xultest runtest" />
            <label id="xultest-text" class="toolbarbutton-text" value="X"></label>
        </toolbar>
    </toolbox>
</overlay>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The way you're doing it, with a setTimeout inside a for loop, what you effectively do is create ten separate timeouts that will all fire approximately at the same time, 5 seconds after you click the button.

What you need to do is create each new timeout only after the previous one fires:

function xultestRunTest2(times) {
    if(times > 0){
        document.getElementById("xultest-text").value =
                        document.getElementById("xultest-text").value + "X";
        setTimeout(function(){ xultestRunTest2(times-1); }, 5000);
    }
}

...

<toolbarbutton oncommand="xultestRunTest2(10);" label="xultest runtest" />

or (this is my favorite method of the three):

function xultestRunTest2() {
    var times = 10;
    function do_cycle(){
        var el = document.getElementById("xultest-text");
        if(times > 0){
            el.value = el.value + "X";
            setTimeout(do_cycle, 5000);
            --times;
        }
    };
    do_cycle();
}

You could also use setInterval() instead:

function xultestRunTest2() {
    var times = 10,
        intervalId;
    intervalId = setInterval(function(){
        if(times > 0){
            document.getElementById("xultest-text").value =
                        document.getElementById("xultest-text").value + "X";
            --times;
        }
        else {
            clearInterval(intervalId);
            intervalId = null;
        }
    }, 5000);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Argh, in my attempt to narrow down my issue to a simple test case I wrote the bad code in the question. I'm going to go back to the drawing board in terms of creating a test case and will come back to the thread once I have it. I do really appreciate your effort on this. If I end up with a completely different test case I will look at maybe creating a new question and tweaking this question to give you the accept. Thanks!. –  studgeek May 24 '11 at 2:15
    
@studgeek Haha, no problem. Feel free to edit this question. –  Zecc May 25 '11 at 9:32
    
I still haven't narrowed down this down to something simple that has the problem. I'm now thinking it has to do with with how FF is threading XHR and iframe parsing. I am doing a lot of both. I wouldn't be surprised if the parsing is causing delays, but I wasn't expecting the skipping. Maybe Firefox batches up redraw events somehow? Anyway, still working on a good example. I'm going to try the firebug-paint-events plugin also to see if it gives any insights. –  studgeek Jun 1 '11 at 18:43

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