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I'm using the following function to calculate checksums on files:

public static void generateChecksums(String strInputFile, String strCSVFile) {
    ArrayList<String[]> outputList = new ArrayList<String[]>();
    try {
        MessageDigest m = MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
        File aFile = new File(strInputFile);
        InputStream is = new FileInputStream(aFile);

        System.out.println(Calendar.getInstance().getTime().toString() + 
                    " Processing Checksum: " + strInputFile);

        double dLength = aFile.length();
        try {
            is = new DigestInputStream(is, m);
            // read stream to EOF as normal...
            int nTmp;
            double dCount = 0;
            String returned_content="";
            while ((nTmp = is.read()) != -1) {
                dCount++;
                if (dCount % 600000000 == 0) {
                    System.out.println(". ");
                } else if (dCount % 20000000 == 0) {
                    System.out.print(". ");
                }
            }
            System.out.println();
        } finally {
            is.close();
        }
        byte[] digest = m.digest();
        m.reset();
        BigInteger bigInt = new BigInteger(1,digest);
        String hashtext = bigInt.toString(16);
        // Now we need to zero pad it if you actually / want the full 32 chars.
        while(hashtext.length() < 32 ){
            hashtext = "0" + hashtext;
        }
        String[] arrayTmp = new String[2];
        arrayTmp[0] = aFile.getName();
        arrayTmp[1] = hashtext;
        outputList.add(arrayTmp);
        System.out.println("Hash Code: " + hashtext);
        UtilityFunctions.createCSV(outputList, strCSVFile, true);
    } catch (NoSuchAlgorithmException nsae) {
        System.out.println(nsae.getMessage());
    } catch (FileNotFoundException fnfe) {
        System.out.println(fnfe.getMessage());
    } catch (IOException ioe) {
        System.out.println(ioe.getMessage());
    }
}

The problem is that the loop to read in the file is really slow:

while ((nTmp = is.read()) != -1) {
    dCount++;
    if (dCount % 600000000 == 0) {
        System.out.println(". ");
    } else if (dCount % 20000000 == 0) {
        System.out.print(". ");
    }
}

A 3 GB file that takes less than a minute to copy from one location to another, takes over an hour to calculate. Is there something I can do to speed this up or should I try to go in a different direction like using a shell command?

Update: Thanks to ratchet freak's suggestion I changed the code to this which is ridiculously faster (I would guess 2048X faster...):

byte[] buff = new byte[2048];
while ((nTmp = is.read(buff)) != -1) {
    dCount += 2048;
    if (dCount % 614400000 == 0) {
        System.out.println(". ");
    } else if (dCount % 20480000 == 0) {
        System.out.print(". ");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
The idea is to indicate the progress to standard out. This was my way of emulating the "hash" behavior of a command line ftp client. The dcount % 60000000 does a println vs. a print. –  opike May 22 '11 at 23:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

use a buffer

byte[] buff = new byte[2048];
while ((nTmp = is.read(buff)) != -1)
{
     dCount+=ntmp;
     //this logic won't work anymore though
     /*
     if (dCount % 600000000 == 0)
     {
         System.out.println(". ");
     }
     else if (dCount % 20000000 == 0)
     {
         System.out.print(". ");
     }
     */
}

edit: or if you don't need the values do

while(is.read(buff)!=-1)is.skip(600000000);

nvm apparently the implementers of DigestInputStream were stupid and didn't test everything properly before release

share|improve this answer
    
DigestInputStream doesn't override skip(), so skipped bytes would not be processed by the digester. –  McDowell May 22 '11 at 23:57
1  
Apparently you didn't read the Javadoc for DigestInputStream, where it doesn't say that skip updates the digest. Downvoted for stupid remark. –  EJP May 23 '11 at 5:42
    
dude it doesn't say anything about skip and they also don't check for nullpointer on the digest on construction leaving you to figure out why you get a NPE on a wrapped stream somewhere else –  ratchet freak May 23 '11 at 11:40
    
Exactly, so the behaviour of skip() is inherited, unlike the behaviour of all three read() methods, which are documented to update the digest. –  EJP May 25 '11 at 4:53

Have you tried removing the println's? I imagine all that string manipulation could be consuming most of the processing!

Edit: I didn't read it clearly, I now realise how infrequently they'd be output, I'd retract my answer but I guess it wasn't totally invaluable :-p (Sorry!)

share|improve this answer
2  
The println's only occur a small % of the time... if anything is affecting the performance its the conditional logic. –  opike May 22 '11 at 23:45
    
+1: For taking console output into consideration. It won't be the only performance enhancement in this situation but many programmers do not realize how much overhead there is when writing to console. It can slow down an application significantly. –  Paul Sasik May 22 '11 at 23:46
    
Downvoted because the "all that string manipulation" is only happening once every twenty million iterations. –  QuantumMechanic May 22 '11 at 23:53

The problem is that System.out.print is used too often. Every time it is called new String objects have to be created and it is expensive.

Use StringBuilder class instead or its thread safe analog StringBuffer.

StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

And every time you need to add something call this:

sb.append("text to be added");

Later, when you are ready to print it:

system.out.println(sb.toString());
share|improve this answer

Frankly there are several problems with your code that makes it slow:

  1. Like ratchet freak said, disk reads must be buffered because Java read()'s are probably translated to operating system IOs calls without automatically buffering, so one read() is 1 system call!!! The operating system will normally perform much better if you use an array as buffer or the BufferedInputStream. Better yet, you can use nio to map the file into memory and read it as fast as the OS can handle it.

  2. You may not believe it, but the dCount++; counter may have used a lot of cycles. I believe even for the latest Intel Core processor, it takes several clock cycles to complete a 64-bit floating point add. You will be much better of to use a long for this counter. If the sole purpose of this counter is to display progress, you can make use of the fact that Java integers overflow without causing an Error and just advance your progress display when a char type wraps to 0 (that's per 65536 reads).

  3. The following string padding is also inefficient. You should use a StringBuilder or a Formatter.

    while(hashtext.length() < 32 ){ hashtext = "0"+hashtext; }

  4. Try using a profiler to find further efficiency problems in your code

share|improve this answer

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